Microsoft Launches Skype Qik For Video Sharing

On Tuesday, the Skype blog was updated with news (opens in new tab) that Microsoft has launched Skype Qik (opens in new tab), a new social app that makes sending short videos extremely easy. The app is free and available now on the Apple App Store, Google Play and the Windows Phone Store.

So what's the point of this new service when Skype is capable of video calls? Skype Qik allows the user to be creative, spontaneous and have fun sending short videos to friends and family. As the blog states, capturing and sharing video is effortless.

After installing the app, users are encouraged to shoot their first forty-second video. After that, users pick the recipients and then send the video on its way. If the recipient doesn't have Skype Qik, then they are provided with a text message inviting that contact to join.

Once the message is sent, the main interface displays a red virtual button to activate the camera, as well as panels showing the stored messages (see below). These videos are deleted in two weeks, indicating that the videos may be stored locally on devices instead of in a central location, which is a good thing.

Don't have time to reply with a full video? Skype Qik also allows users to take five-second "Flicks" clips in a GIF format. The app already has a few installed, but users can create their own and keep them stored indefinitely on their device. Users can store up to 12 Qik Flicks GIF images.

"This is just our first release," the blog said. "We're excited to see how you'll use Qik and we'll be working on new features inspired by your feedback."

Skype acquired video-streaming service Qik (opens in new tab) back in 2011 for $150 million. Formerly located in Redwood City, California, Qik was known for providing a two-way video conferencing app for mobile devices, and for providing means for customers to share their videos with each other through email, SMS, social websites, on the Qik website and more.

Does the new Skype Qik seem a little scary? After all, these videos, which again are stored for two weeks, show where the user has been. Of course, so do photographs, but this service provides 40-second windows into the lives of its users… and possibly others not wanting to be captured in video.

The good news here is that once the user deletes a video stored on the mobile device, it's erased on all other devices too. Then again, Microsoft has this to say about video deletion: "It may be possible for recipients to capture and save videos elsewhere before they are deleted from Qik."

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  • MumblinBerk
    How private / secure is Qik going to be?
    Reply
  • alextheblue
    How private / secure is Qik going to be?

    It's as about as secure as the people you send it to... That being the case, I don't recommend you film yourself naked and send it to people.

    Unless you're actually a really hot chick and you send it to me. :P
    Reply
  • Jennifer Josh
    There is way more cooler app called "Vidback" check it out...

    Skype Qik will never go MainStream ! it's 100% like GLIDE app which has been around for more than a year... Glide was already on #25 TOP Overall but didn't make it to the mainstream,

    on the other hand there is a new app called Vidback that has interesting concept for Context based interaction, check it out and tell me what you think

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOeYXqa2MFE

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/vidback/id789150905?mt=8

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.vidback.app
    Reply