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Microsoft Now Selling Surface 3, Provides Surface, Surface 2 Trade-In Program

Back in March, Microsoft introduced the Surface 3 tablet, the company's "thinnest and lightest" Surface tablet to date. The big deal with this device is that it isn't based on Windows RT and an ARM-based chip, but rather the full-blown version of Windows 8.1 and Intel's Atom processor.

Customers can now purchase this tablet and its accessories through the online Microsoft Store, Microsoft's brick-and-mortar stores, and select retailers such as Best Buy and Costco.

In addition to the Surface 3's availability, Microsoft also announced the launch of a trade-in program. For a limited time only, customers with the Surface RT or Surface 2 can bring their tablet into a Microsoft Store and receive up to $150 towards the purchase of a Surface 3. You can also perform the trade-in online by heading here.

Without reading too much into it, this trade-in deal makes it seem as though Microsoft is tacitly acknowledging that earlier Windows RT Surface devices need to be replaced. Windows RT was a colossal failure for Redmond, and although Surface devices themselves proved to be high-enough quality, Microsoft has clearly moved on from Windows RT/ARM. So much so, in fact, that it wants to get older Surface devices off the streets and put the hot new Surface 3 into as many willing hands as possible.

Here's how it works: First, customers select the tablet they currently own: the Surface RT (2012), the Surface 2 (2013) or the Surface 2 with 4G (2013). Next, customers must appraise their device. Is it working? Is the customer trading in accessories? Click the "working" choice, and customers will see a pop-up explaining what qualifies as "working." For example, the screen must not have cracks or dead pixels, and the cursor must respond normally to touch.  

Once consumers answer all the questions, they click the calculate button. As an experiment, we chose "working," selected the power adapter and touch cover keyboard and selected 64 GB for the capacity. This produced a $100 redemption code that could be applied to the Surface 3 purchase. Of course, it's up to Microsoft to determine the exact condition and the final value, which they will do when the tablet is in their hands. Once the tablet has been evaluated, the company will send a promo code by email. Simply use this code when purchasing the Surface 3.

To celebrate the launch of the Surface 3, Microsoft is also offering a 10 percent discount to students who are looking to purchase the Surface 3 or other Microsoft products.

Microsoft is selling the Surface 3 in two configurations: 64 GB of internal storage with 2 GB of RAM and 128 GB of storage with 4 GB of RAM. Both models include a 10.8-inch ClearType display with a 1920 x 1280 resolution and support for the Surface Pen. Backing this screen is an Intel quad-core Atom x7-Z8700 (Cherry Trail) processor (1.6 GHz, 2.4 GHz burst) and a battery promising up to 10 hours on a single charge. Other hardware details include an 8MP camera on the back, a 3.5MP camera on the front and Wireless AC connectivity.

To purchase the Surface 3, head here. The Wi-Fi-based model with 64 GB of storage and 2 GB of RAM costs $499. For $100 more, customers can purchase the 128 GB / 4 GB RAM / Wi-Fi model. There's also two 4G LTE models that are listed as "coming soon."

The Surface 3 Type Cover costs an additional $129.99.

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  • bmwman91
    Sign me up! Looks like I found a good use for my Surface RT. It has actually served me well over the years. Since MS makes a Remote Desktop application for the Surface RT, it actually proved to be mega useful for me when I was traveling since I could just RD into my home machine and use "real" Windows while carrying a nice, light machine around.
    Reply
  • razor512
    It seems like an overly high trade in requirement since the unless you have many (like 8+) dead pixels, they will not RMA the device. Thus their trade in requirement are more stringent than their quality guarantees for their devices.
    Reply
  • bmwman91
    15807648 said:
    It seems like an overly high trade in requirement since the unless you have many (like 8+) dead pixels, they will not RMA the device. Thus their trade in requirement are more stringent than their quality guarantees for their devices.

    Perhaps so. Since mine is in perfect condition, and I would really like to be able to run x86 software, it seems like a pretty good deal. As far as dead pixels, I don't think that I have ever had one on a laptop (granted, I have never once bought a consumer-grade machine: they have all been Thinkpads and Elitebooks). The last screen I ran into with a dead pixel was a brand new 24" monitor back in 2007. Anyway, I am not saying that they don't exist, but QC for LCD screens has improved dramatically in the last decade and I almost never have to deal with warranty repairs for screens. The last time I needed to warranty a screen, it was a 2008 Thinkpad with an IPS/Flexview display which apparently had a known issue where dust could get between the pixels and screen filter causing black areas.
    Reply
  • RedJaron
    I highly recommend the 4GB RAM version. I've got a 2GB Win 8.1 tablet and running out of RAM is a regular problem when I've got more than a few browser tabs open.
    Reply
  • rexter
    I highly recommend the 4GB RAM version. I've got a 2GB Win 8.1 tablet and running out of RAM is a regular problem when I've got more than a few browser tabs open.
    I agree that more RAM is good specially when browsing with multiple tabs.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    Indeed. It is a little weird that there still is 2 gig option. Why not 4 or 8 gig. The ssd size is quite good actually.
    Reply
  • ubercake
    I select any combo of Surface RT and either keyboard or no keyboard or both keyboards and still get $100.
    Reply
  • RedJaron
    15810481 said:
    Indeed. It is a Littellin weird that there still is 2gig option. Why not 4 or 8 gig. The ssd size is quite good actually.
    I don't think it's weird. 2GB is fine for people that use it casually. Those who want to push the device more ( such as many folks on these forums, ) will be better served with 4GB, which is why I recommended it. Throwing in 8GB is overkill. It's a 32-bit OS anyway. Using a 64-bit OS eats up more storage space. And don't forget the CPU's limitation. If you're doing work that needs 8GB RAM, that's generally not a task a 2W CPU can keep up with. You'd need a laptop, ultrabook, or SP3 for that kind of horsepower.

    Sure, it'd be nice to have a 4GB/64GB version, but that would mean very few people would want the 4GB/128GB version. Same reason you won't find an i3/128GB version of the SP3: it'd cannibalize sales of the i5 versions.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    32bit version? Why? It maybe eats a little bit more memory, but still...
    Reply
  • ubercake
    I love my Surface RT which I literally inherited, but I would not have bought it with my own cash. I really think MS needs to offer pricing on the Surface 3 at around $300 to compete with like products with like configurations.

    It's really hard to take the Surface 3 seriously when there are things like the Asus T100 (comes with a keyboard/dock) for so much less money at around $350. When you consider what it really costs to even buy the low-end Surface 3 when you throw the $120 keyboard in the mix, you're talking about a $620+ entry point for a tablet. That's not good. Even with this discount, you're still looking at a near $500 device (with the keyboard) with only a 1-year warranty. If MS is going for a premium market, they need to offer a 3-year warrant and treat their customers like they're dealing with a premium product. If they won't back their product for more than a year, they need to drop the price down between $300-$400 with the keyboard.

    Pricing on the Pro models is a different story, but the Surface 3 is the new entry point into their products. They need to compete price-wise or get out of that particular low-end market the Surface 3 sits in.
    Reply