Folding@Home Removed from PS3 with 4.30 Update

Stanford University's distributed computing project Folding@Home will no longer be supported as the Life with PlayStation application will no longer be offered with the latest update.

The PS3 supported protein folding simulations over the past five years as part of an effort to find cures for medical conditions such as Alzheimer's Disease, or Type II Diabetes. Back in 2007, when the program was introduced on PlayStation, the game console offered tremendous floating point processing power to drive Folding@Home simulations, but developments have given new GPUs the lead. Statistically, the PS3 is ranked well behind the performance capability of ATI and Nvidia graphics processors. At FAHcon 2012, scientists published some numbers showing just how far computing performance has come since the project's beginnings.

Given the long-standing partnership, the cutoff was rather quick and effective. Both Folding@Home and Sony restricted themselves to rather short statements with the usual thank you speech and a conclusion of achievements. Stanford's project leader Vijay Pande referred to "numerous successes in recent years" that could lead to drug development. Of course, the successes were not only due to Sony's participation and Pande was quick to remove references of Sony's support from the Folding@Home website.

The 4.30 system update also changes the way trophies are displayed in the XMB. The trophy level progress is now being displayed, along with trophies that have been earned when playing on the Vita.

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  • zakaron
    Not really surprised, this is just another casualty in scaling back the PS3 capabilities. For those keeping score, we lost:
    - PS2 backward compatibility (both hardware then software emulation)
    - Linux support / OtherOS
    - 2 USB ports
    - Card reader
    - and now Folding@Home

    I'm sure I probably missed some, but it's certainly not the same machine it was when it released in 2006. Granted, we did gain other functionality over the years, but still unfortunate to see features cut.
  • matt_b
    So specifically removing support for F@H accomplishes what?
  • Other Comments
  • matt_b
    So specifically removing support for F@H accomplishes what?
  • zakaron
    Not really surprised, this is just another casualty in scaling back the PS3 capabilities. For those keeping score, we lost:
    - PS2 backward compatibility (both hardware then software emulation)
    - Linux support / OtherOS
    - 2 USB ports
    - Card reader
    - and now Folding@Home

    I'm sure I probably missed some, but it's certainly not the same machine it was when it released in 2006. Granted, we did gain other functionality over the years, but still unfortunate to see features cut.
  • warmon6
    A bit late on the draw there Tom's as i heard about it over 24 hours ago.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/page-268010_28_6450.html#t2671318

    As for why it was removed, there a few idea's floating around but to us folders, it's clear that in not just a Sony only move. If anything, it's looks more like it was at standfords end.

    Hear's is what im guessing that's currently going on based on other resent events.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/page-268010_28_6450.html#t2671796


    Quote:
    Well it probably has to do with something about the recent news about the gpu's quick return bonus.


    In there it said some stuff about that before you had to make WU's that could only run on UNI, another with smp, and then the gpu. Now we already have WU's able to work on both UNI and SMP and here soon, GPU's will be able to run the same WU's as SMP/UNI and vice-versa.

    If i had to guess why the PS3 is being let go, it's due too:

    1. What was once the strong point of the PS3 of having (at the time) nearly the speed of the gpu and the flexibility of the cpu is now being eliminated by gpu's and multi cores/processor computers that can do the same work.

    2. the PS3 been a static area in terms of performance over the years. (cpu not getting faster in them and amount of users been flat-lining lately)

    3. PS3 probably need a special WU made for it so it cant take these "one WU for all clients" approach.


    Basicly to simply put, for what there able to get out of it and the amount of work needed to keep the PS3 going is not worth the rewards anymore.