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Dual Raspberry Pi Device is a Cyberdeck for Network Security

Raspberry Pi
(Image credit: Michael Torino)

We love Raspberry Pi cyberdecks, including all of the fun ways the community has contained our favorite SBC over the years and this project from Michael Torino joins our list of favorites. Torino began developing the Portable Threat & Security Device (PTSD for short) to keep busy during the early lockdowns of 2020. This project quickly snowballed into a quality network security rig capable of supporting a small facility on its own.

According to Torino, the idea was to create an all-in-one device that could handle most network security and support needs without lugging additional "accessory cases" frequently found on the ground in military deployment. His solution was to install two Raspberry Pi 4s inside of a single Pelican V100 Pistol Case which measures in at just 12.7" x 12.6" x 5.5".

The best Raspberry Pi projects use more than one Pi (because we can't get enough) and this project is no exception. One of the Pis is running Ubuntu while the other is running an instance of Kali. Torino can swap between them with a KVM switch as they share a 1280 x 800 IPS LCD touchscreen.

We asked Torino if he had a chance to use the device out and about for testing, he said "I've been using it in my garage so far. It has been taken apart and put back together many times and seems to be holding up well."

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Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Michael Torino)
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Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Michael Torino)
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Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Michael Torino)

There are a few upgrades in the works that should be field testing more plausible. Power is an issue, making mobility (a critical component to the portability of the project) a bit of a strain until a more powerful battery is implemented that can support both Pis and the touchscreen.

If you're going to make an all-in-one rig, why not go all out? Torino plans to include a Pi Cam as well as additional features like a software-defined radio or possibly a Wi-Fi Pineapple, which is good for testing network penetration. Follow Michael Torino on YouTube for more updates on this cool project.