Skip to main content

HP CEO Meg Whitman Received $15.4M in 2012

The executive received a base pay of $1 and option awards with a value of $6,414,249 and stock awards valued at $7,040,076, which made up the lion's share of Whitman's compensation.

Whitman's pay was heavily criticized by shareholders especially because of the fact that HP's sales dropped from $127 billion in 2011 to $120 billion in 2012 and the circumstance that the company had to report a loss of $12.7 billion, down from a profit of $7.1 billion in the year before.

One investment firm, GMI/The Corporate Library, rated HP with "Very High Concern" in its executive pay, which HP dismissed stating that "2012 executive pay was far below the vote at the vast majority of companies." Harvard management professor Jay Lorsch criticized Whitman's activities outside of HP, saying that despite her near $16 million pay, she also chose to remain on the board of Procter & Gamble board, which "has the highest number [of] overburdened CEOs of any company in the Standard & Poor's 500."

"This is probably not the kind of board you want for a company that's about to face a crisis," Lorsch said.

Contact Us for News Tips, Corrections and Feedback

  • cinergy
    Soon she'll lose that amount of money when she drives HP down the drain.
    Reply
  • Uberragen21
    Meg Whitman is a dumb &%#$. All CEOs and board members decide each other's pay, not the actual owners of the company (share holders). Wouldn't it be nice if we could all decide that, despite poor performance at our mundane jobs, we deserve a nice 500% bonus above our base salary.
    Shit, count me in!
    Reply
  • Hey HP, i will work for $1 with $500,000 in stock options and i will give you a much better chance returning to profitability, if you hire me.
    Reply
  • rantoc
    cinergySoon she'll lose that amount of money when she drives HP down the drain.
    She wont lose a dime, paid to take responsibility while in the end takes none when it goes bad. Its like any other company really, the higher up the less real risk to loose in the end as their future is already secured.
    Reply
  • martel80
    Provided both the stock and the options have a 2-year vesting period, she may be left with much less after the 2 years.
    Reply
  • virtualban
    That old saying, "every nation has the government it deserves", while not quite true for people and their nationality, is extremely accurate for shareholders and the CEO of their company.
    You are not shackled to HP. Drop it, go find somewhere else to invest to.
    Reply
  • abbadon_34
    Funny how she was so popular as a highly paid female CEO until she ran for California Governor as a Republican ...
    Reply
  • merikafyeah
    Well good for her. Elsewhere, in the Republic of Debt- excuse me- the United States of China, everyone seems to have gotten exceptionally good at bending over, and quite unabashedly at that.
    Reply
  • greghome
    rantocShe wont lose a dime, paid to take responsibility while in the end takes none when it goes bad. Its like any other company really, the higher up the less real risk to loose in the end as their future is already secured.Welcome to modern Capitalism....
    Reply
  • house70
    Shut up, Meg.
    Reply