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Tom's Hardware's AMA With Qualcomm, In Its Entirety

Asynchronous Multi-Processing And Tablet Use Cases

Q. Would you be able to share with us the process on how the Snapdragon SoCs are selected by OEMs for their smartphones and tablets? Is it a competitive process where the best chip wins?  I caught the DTS theatre demo at CES this year. It was certainly impressive, but I don't see myself using my tablet as the centre of my entertainment system. What else has to change about the industry before a high-end SoC is viewed as a viable replacement for a home theatre setup?

A. We can’t comment on the OEM selection process, as that is determined by each OEM.  The theater demo shows not only the capabilities of the theater use-case but also the experience you can get from your mobile device and taking that theater-quality audio with you wherever you go on your device.

Q. My understanding is that Qualcomm quad-core processors can operate on any number of cores. If that's correct and they can operate on a single core to save power when that core is sufficient for the current does that mean your quad-core processors actually require less power, at minimum than your dual core processors? Asked another way, does your dual-core S4 Plus in the GS3 for Razr HD actually have a higher minimum power usage than your S4 Pro, Snapdragon 600, or Snapdragon 800? I'm wondering because that means a newer phone with your quad-core processor has the potential to get better battery life with the same size battery. Of course that doesn't take into consideration other factors but we'll assume the same screen and other things which I realize is unlikely.

A. Qualcomm Snapdragon processors leverage our Asynchronous Multi-Processing (aSMP) design. Select a task and one the four cores will snap into action. Each core can throttle up and down depending on the task. The result is increased battery efficiency and a whole lot of performance. Check out this video explaining how aSMP works (http://www.qualcomm.com/media/videos/asynchronous-snapdragon-processors-improve-battery-life)

  • ojas
    You know, i really didn't like this AMA. They were simply regurgitating marketing speak.

    I asked them about binary translation for x86 (something like what Intel does with ARM for Android), they didn't even answer, or acknowledge that i had asked.

    Even all they answers they DID give, weren't very interesting.

    Quite unlike Asus and CM. I think it's simply because Qualcomm isn't an enthusiast company, they go into phones and tablets. Only PC manufacturers and vendors are transparent about what they do.

    Mobile is just a closed down system. :(

    Long live the PC!
    Reply
  • aramisathei
    Seems like they delegated this to marketing instead of letting R&D have their 15 minutes.
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1
    11192830 said:
    You know, i really didn't like this AMA. They were simply regurgitating marketing speak.

    I asked them about binary transition for x86 (something like what Intel does with ARM for Android), they didn't even answer, or acknowledge that i had asked.

    Even all they answers they DID give, weren't very interesting.

    Quite unlike Asus and CM. I think it's simply because Qualcomm isn't an enthusiast company, they go into phones and tablets. Only PC manufacturers and vendors are transparent about what they do.

    Mobile is just a closed down system. :(

    Long live the PC!

    +1
    They are giving the similar answers to every question. I expected better.
    Reply
  • irish_adam
    Yeah that has to be the most boring AMA, the whole thing just sounds like a bot throwing out generalised answers to every question. I mean they couldnt even be bothered to answer half the questions and just linked to other material, we could have just used google for that
    Reply
  • m32
    I enjoy the first three pages. Thanks Toms and Qualcomm!
    Reply
  • adgjlsfhk
    Q. Do you see yourselves entering into competitive x86-64 space in the future?

    A. Qualcomm modems support the latest communication technologies, including the latest advancements in LTE. With the introduction of Qualcomm Snapdragon 800, Qualcomm is shipping its 3rd generation LTE modem and was first to launch LTE Advanced with Carrier Aggregation (CA), a key feature that effectively doubles data rates for typical LTE users up to a peak data rate of 150 Mbps. Technologies like CA and other LTE-A features such at heterogeneous networks will help bring the LTE experience to the next level.

    I believe the question was about whether Qualcomm is going to produce x86-64 processors, not whether they are advancing LTE.
    Reply
  • Cataclysm_ZA
    11196679 said:
    I believe the question was about whether Qualcomm is going to produce x86-64 processors, not whether they are advancing LTE.

    They definitely had someone copy-pasta those answers. Way to fail, Qualcomm!
    Reply
  • anything4this
    Tom's, can you please ask for R&D to speak next time? We want more technical info, not marketing crap. I like the idea of AMA's on here though, fun stuff!
    Reply