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A-DATA Using ''DNA Authentication'' to ID RAM

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 19 comments

A-DATA is forced to use an invisible numbering system on all of its DRAM modules.

A-DATA Technology said today that it now must use what it calls a DNA authentication technology in all of its standard DRAM modules thanks to problematic counterfeiting and fraud, a "serious and growing problem" in the DRAM industry, according to the company. A-DATA said that the authentication technology--while not using real DNA--will embed an invisible sequence of a unique DNA into the product label, not the actual DRAM module.

"As a leading manufacturer of DRAM module in the industry, A-DATA is committed to offer the highest quality of DRAM module and solution to the consumers," said Gibson Chen, Vice President and Head of Product Management Division. "Thus, we adopted the DNA authentication technology to protect our intellectual property and our consumers’ interests."

So what does DNA authentication mean to the consumer? This guarantees a true A-DATA product, and not a fake DRAM module stamped with A-DATA's logo. To verify the chip's authenticity, consumers and retailers can simply use a black light pen that will light up the DNA's fluorescent coding. The label itself also utilizes "special designed significant cuts" that keeps counterfeiters from removing it easily.

While this implementation of authentication is interesting, it will only be a matter of time before counterfeiters figure out a way around the new system.

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Top Comments
  • 18 Hide
    apache_lives , October 23, 2009 12:26 AM
    who would bother counterfitting semi-generic ram brands like A-DATA?
Other Comments
  • 7 Hide
    liquid0h , October 23, 2009 12:00 AM
    You know when the new U.S $20's came out they were forged in a week. I wonder how long it will take for this?
  • 0 Hide
    stumpystumped , October 23, 2009 12:05 AM
    producing counterfeit notes costs significantly less than the note values. highly doubt counterfeiting RAM would be as profitable.
  • Display all 19 comments.
  • 18 Hide
    apache_lives , October 23, 2009 12:26 AM
    who would bother counterfitting semi-generic ram brands like A-DATA?
  • 5 Hide
    Supertrek32 , October 23, 2009 12:54 AM
    You'd think re-branding would be a much greater concern than counterfeiting...
  • 0 Hide
    ptroen , October 23, 2009 12:58 AM
    Sounds like a oligopoly practice to keep the ram prices from falling.
  • 2 Hide
    tester24 , October 23, 2009 1:49 AM
    Is A-Data memory even good?
  • 0 Hide
    tester24 , October 23, 2009 1:50 AM
    err I meant to say is it even worth copying?
  • 0 Hide
    cybrcatter , October 23, 2009 2:07 AM
    ptroenSounds like a oligopoly practice to keep the ram prices from falling.

    How is protecting brand identity an ologopolisitc practice?
    Besides, of all the PC component markets, ram is one of the most competitive. PC technology in general(hardware, not software) are very price competitive, even amongst duopolies such as AMD/Intel or AMD/Nvidia.
    I can get a GPU today for $100 that would have cost me more than three times that two years ago.


  • 3 Hide
    acecombat , October 23, 2009 2:31 AM
    TomsTo verify the chip's authenticity, consumers and retailers can simply use a black light pen that will light up the DNA's fluorescent coding.


    Ohh blacklight ink, that's only been around for years, that's gonna be hard to duplicate. /sarcasm
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , October 23, 2009 2:32 AM
    It's not like you have a blue light in the store (or at online shops) to test it out..
    Most RAM I've purchased worked perfectly fine!
    I guess the issue lies more with the faster than DDR2 800 Mhz modules, which often are overclocked ones...
  • 0 Hide
    vladtepes , October 23, 2009 5:21 AM
    A-Data WHO???
  • 0 Hide
    archange , October 23, 2009 5:59 AM
    Well, publicity never hurt anyone...
  • 1 Hide
    anamaniac , October 23, 2009 7:37 AM
    Honestly, I don't care as long as it works.

    ProDigit80It's not like you have a blue light in the store (or at online shops) to test it out..Most RAM I've purchased worked perfectly fine!I guess the issue lies more with the faster than DDR2 800 Mhz modules, which often are overclocked ones...

    I keep two blacklights... $10 for both of them... makes for cool case lighting.

    tester24Is A-Data memory even good?

    Yeah, they make decent products.
  • 0 Hide
    ssalim , October 23, 2009 3:06 PM
    Yea, also put lojack on my $1 pen.
    Very useful.
  • 0 Hide
    nachowarrior , October 23, 2009 4:28 PM
    ssalimYea, also put lojack on my $1 pen.Very useful.

    if you're trying to sell a million of those pens... it might be :-p
  • 1 Hide
    cookoy , October 23, 2009 6:51 PM
    the authentication technology will be embedded on the product label and not the DRAM module and this will guarantee the chip's authenticity?
  • -1 Hide
    virtualban , October 23, 2009 8:07 PM
    They can track down single mothers sharing files over the internet, and prove their guilt despite the computer being formatted, and can't track down physical dram counterfeiters? They [government] have protected consumers far enough, stop protecting them anymore if this is the kind of protection they provide.
  • 0 Hide
    caskachan , October 26, 2009 10:33 AM
    1-buy ram
    2-test
    3-works?
    4-profit

    i dont care if its adata kingston or super talent.. if it works and it cheap im gettign what i pay for
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , October 26, 2009 12:47 PM
    "To verify the chip's authenticity, consumers and retailers can simply use a black light pen that will light up the DNA's fluorescent coding."


    They HAVE heard of something called fluorescent ink, right? As in the stuff you can buy in a stationery shop for $1.50 a bottle?