Crucial is selling 64GB LPCAMM2 Micron memory modules for $330

Crucial LPCAMM2
(Image credit: Crucial)

With the new low-profile CAMM2 memory standard now being adopted by laptop makers, Crucial has begun selling 32GB and 64GB LPCAMM2 modules for $179.99 and $329.99 respectively. These modules come with speedy LPDDR5X 7500MHz ICs and are designed to be replacements or memory upgrades for systems that support Micron's LPCAMM2 memory.

LPCAMM2 is one of only a couple of brand-new memory modules utilizing the all-new CAMM2 JEDEC memory standard. CAMM2 is a new form factor for DDR5 that is 64% smaller than DDR5 SO-DIMM memory. CAMM2 is so small thanks to its bandwidth capabilities, which allows just one module to fill the entire 128-bit memory bus of a CPU's memory controller. This allows just one module to achieve the same bandwidth as two DDR5 SO-DIMM modules operating in dual-channel mode.

CAMM2 can be utilized with either standard DDR5 ICs or faster LPDDR5X ICs. Micron has opted to go with the latter with its LPCAMM2 modules, which feature a 7500 MT/s rating that provides 1.3x more bandwidth compared to standard DDR5 (operating at JEDEC speeds). LPDDR5X also enables Micron's LPCAMM2 modules to have 43-58% lower active power consumption and up to a whopping 80% lower standby power.

At the moment, Micron's new memory is only supported on the Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Gen 7, the first and currently only computing device on the market right now that uses CAMM2-style memory. As a result, Crucial's new modules will only be beneficial for ThinkPad P1 Gen 7 users who want to upgrade to 64GB of memory. 

However, CAMM2's immense size, performance, and power efficiency improvements are impossible to ignore. We fully expect other device manufacturers and even desktop motherboard makers to begin adopting the standard shortly.

Both the 32GB and 64GB versions of the modules sport 16GB LPDDR5X dies operating at 1.05v at 7500 MHz. Crucial is only selling each capacity in single module formats since there is no need for dual-channel kits with CAMM2 memory.

$179.99 and $329.99 might be really expensive for what is effectively high-clocked DDR5 memory, but that is the price you pay for bleeding-edge technology. Once CAMM2 goes mainstream, we can expect pricing to start dropping, similar to how DDR5 memory prices dropped after the Ryzen 7000 series launch made DDR5 popular in the desktop space.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • Notton
    It's kind of pricey when DDR5 5600 SODIMM costs $230 for 2x32GB, and $110 for 2x16GB, but I think it's well worth the premium.
    Reply
  • neojack
    it's actually not so expensive, given that it's the actual bleeding edge of the technology.

    i paid much much more for the kit of ram in my signature back in the days of the 2700x
    Reply
  • Jagar123
    Notton said:
    It's kind of pricey when DDR5 5600 SODIMM costs $230 for 2x32GB, and $110 for 2x16GB, but I think it's well worth the premium.
    Yeah this is a lot less greedy than I thought I'd see. Maybe they learned this time around?
    Reply
  • 8086
    I really hope to see CAMM2 in a dual channel format for desktops in the future. Come on AMD, make it happen!
    Reply
  • usertests
    8086 said:
    I really hope to see CAMM2 in a dual channel format for desktops in the future. Come on AMD, make it happen!
    I don't think we know for sure if CAMM will be helpful at all for desktop/SFF in terms of space savings, achievable speeds, signal integrity, etc., but it shouldn't take long to figure it out.

    You can get dual-channel in one module, and may be able to stack two CAMMs. If Intel or AMD make future consumer desktop platforms quad-channel for faster APUs that would be interesting.
    Reply
  • gamer1227
    $180 for 32 GB is great considering brands like Apple abd Microsoft charge $200+ for 8 GB and it is close to soldered RAM in performace and size. Finally ultrabooks can be 80% insufferable instead of 100%.

    Looks like a lpcamm module takes the same area as 1 SODIMM slot, so it have better density than SODDIM at 64GB per slot.

    It could be useful in SFF desktops, you can put the ram slot closer to the CPU, since it is very thin it would not interfere with the cooler.
    Reply