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Toshiba Says Goodbye To Netbooks in USA

By - Source: Liliputing | B 26 comments

Toshiba no longer plans to offer netbooks in North America.

Liliputing reports that Toshiba America has no plans to release new netbooks here in the States. An unnamed Toshiba executive confirmed that the company will instead focus on pumping out ultrabooks like the Portege Z830 series. Ultrabooks offer a thin and light form factor, but feature superior performance and a heftier price tag than netbooks.

At one time Toshiba was one of the more popular netbook manufacturers with enthusiasts. This was mostly due to its large, easy to use keyboards. Toshiba has manufactured netbooks for a number of years and may still sell the devices internationally. Case in point: The Toshiba NB510 revealed at CES 2012. This netbook features an Intel Atom N2600 Cedar Trail processor but won't be released here.

Toshiba is likely pulling out of the netbook race locally because sales just aren't there. Consumers are flocking to tablets and, as of late, ultrabooks. Currently rivals Acer, HP and Asus are still releasing the low-end portable systems, but Dell and Lenovo have officially pulled out of the local netbook market. Sony and Samsung still haven't launched a new model this year.

Overall, netbook shipments are down 34-percent from last year and now account for about 5-percent of global PC shipments. Looking ahead, they may soon be wiped off the face of the PC sector, replaced by low-end ultrabooks. Because Intel reportedly won't lower Ivy Bridge CPU prices, manufacturers are compromising by throwing in cheaper Sandy Bridge CPUs, swapping out SSD for HDDs, and using cheap batteries. This class will likely be a bit pricier than netbooks, but the tradeoff is better performance. For those looking for something in the netbook price range, these models will be far easier to tolerate budget-wise than the pricier high-end $800+ ultrabooks.

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  • 15 Hide
    cloakster , May 27, 2012 7:12 PM
    Lemme know when ultrabooks go down below $300, until then my netbook is doing just fine :) 
  • 10 Hide
    Grand_Admiral_K , May 27, 2012 8:50 PM
    You know, maybe I'm just crazy, but I have never regretted buying my little ASUS netbook. All I have ever done to it was put in a 2Gb stick of RAM in it and it did everything I ever needed it to do. Mostly, I just used it in school for listening to music, internet browsing, word processing, and some light gaming via a game boy emulator. I have been very happy with it, so I just don't understand all this hate that people have for netbooks.
Other Comments
  • 5 Hide
    esrever , May 27, 2012 6:27 PM
    Good riddance.
  • 15 Hide
    cloakster , May 27, 2012 7:12 PM
    Lemme know when ultrabooks go down below $300, until then my netbook is doing just fine :) 
  • 7 Hide
    NuclearShadow , May 27, 2012 7:23 PM
    One of the issues of net-books is that they tended to be so close in price to lower end laptops and the low end laptops had superior enough hardware to go with them instead. The only thing net-books really had going for them was battery life.
  • 2 Hide
    Tomtompiper , May 27, 2012 7:30 PM
    Squeezed out by Android.
  • 0 Hide
    wintermint , May 27, 2012 7:30 PM
    It's a good step, the netbook phrase is long gone. Reallocate your resources in improving your current products and driving ultrabook prices down to a more comfortable level for the common consumers.
  • 10 Hide
    Grand_Admiral_K , May 27, 2012 8:50 PM
    You know, maybe I'm just crazy, but I have never regretted buying my little ASUS netbook. All I have ever done to it was put in a 2Gb stick of RAM in it and it did everything I ever needed it to do. Mostly, I just used it in school for listening to music, internet browsing, word processing, and some light gaming via a game boy emulator. I have been very happy with it, so I just don't understand all this hate that people have for netbooks.
  • 9 Hide
    nukemaster , May 27, 2012 8:53 PM
    Grand_Admiral_KYou know, maybe I'm just crazy, but I have never regretted buying my little ASUS netbook. All I have ever done to it was put in a 2Gb stick of RAM in it and it did everything I ever needed it to do. Mostly, I just used it in school for listening to music, internet browsing, word processing, and some light gaming via a game boy emulator. I have been very happy with it, so I just don't understand all this hate that people have for netbooks.

    Many users expect too much. For a good percentage of all the people(I hate to say it, but with a good 80% of people just wanting a computer for facebook/ect), a netbook would work just fine.

    I never had a netbook because i want a bit more power, but can not fault anyone who gets one for its main purpose. web surfing and typing documents(general use) as well as very good battery life.
  • 4 Hide
    Anonymous , May 27, 2012 9:09 PM
    Yes but when is toshiba going to say hello to ever updating their customized Intel HD graphics drivers?
  • -2 Hide
    jhansonxi , May 27, 2012 9:37 PM
    esreverGood riddance.
    I have an old Toshiba M35X-S114 consumer laptop that has lasted years with very few problems (shorted power supply cord, loose hard drive connection). I have a Dell Inspiron 11Z (1110) netbook that failed completely after two years of relatively light usage, mostly for Skype sessions. I've heard many complaints about Toshiba in general but I never tried their netbooks. Are they really that bad? Maybe I'm just lucky with the laptop.
  • 2 Hide
    tntom , May 27, 2012 10:12 PM
    Quote:
    hansonxi I have an old Toshiba M35X-S114 consumer laptop that has lasted years with very few problems (shorted power supply cord, loose hard drive connection). I have a Dell Inspiron 11Z (1110) netbook that failed completely after two years of relatively light usage, mostly for Skype sessions. I've heard many complaints about Toshiba in general but I never tried their netbooks. Are they really that bad? Maybe I'm just lucky with the laptop.


    I have a Toshiba Mini NB500 Netbook I bought for my wife back in March. Other than the screen resolution being too low on netbooks it is perfect (I should invest in an external monitor for my wife). It has a premium build quality without the price. No flex at all to it's plastic chassis. It can take quite a few drops without any damage.

    My wife teaches online and the power goes out here alot. When it does she switches to a USB 3G modem and can teach for 6hrs without power (which has happened quite a few times). And that is with Flash based whiteboard teaching tools and several required internet services drawing power all at the same time over the entire shift.

    I loaded a fresh install of Win7 right after purchase so I don't have the video driver problem others have but the real problem is Intel never updates their drivers. The driver on Intel's website is over two years old and causes some desktop UI issues and some flash issues.
  • 3 Hide
    shafe88 , May 27, 2012 10:42 PM
    Intel probably paid Toshiba to not sell netbook's in the US just for people to buy their more expensive Ultra-books which will have a hard time competing with AMD's Ultra-thins.
  • 1 Hide
    boilthebunny , May 27, 2012 10:43 PM
    I remember when people here scoffed when analysts said the iPad would take sales away from netbooks.
    I guess analyst are smarter than techies when it comes to the consumer. Laptop sales maybe hurting too.
  • 0 Hide
    sonofliberty08 , May 27, 2012 10:44 PM
    Grand_Admiral_KYou know, maybe I'm just crazy, but I have never regretted buying my little ASUS netbook. All I have ever done to it was put in a 2Gb stick of RAM in it and it did everything I ever needed it to do. Mostly, I just used it in school for listening to music, internet browsing, word processing, and some light gaming via a game boy emulator. I have been very happy with it, so I just don't understand all this hate that people have for netbooks.

    all the hates r because it was intel atom inside, if it has amd fusion apu inside then it will be fine
  • 2 Hide
    mitch074 , May 27, 2012 11:15 PM
    There are netbooks and netbooks - I own both an MSI Wind U-100 (now 3 years old) and an Asus Eee 900 (two). The first one got an extra stick of RAM, and I swapped their HDD. Moreover, I installed Linux on both instead of XP Home (MSI) or Win7 Starter (Asus) - performance got much better with a bloat-less OS, and desktop compositing does help on managing the screen's real estate through some plugins.
    The Eee is now used as a small web browser and email client - its battery soon lost its capacity, so it's not mobile any more and prety much nothing more than a smart terminal.
    The MSI though, is still going strong with more than 2 hours of battery life (it's the original 3-cells version) in light browsing mode, its latest BIOS update and a few tweaks solved all its Linux compatibility problems, it's fast enough for mobile use and I can overclock it by 20% when on AC - enough to watch many MPEG-4 720p videos on Youtube. With a USB keyboard and mouse, a DVD burner and a HD screen plugged in, it's a solid office PC; on the move, with the smartphone plugged in as a 3G modem, it's the perfect mobile office. I have rather large hands, so typing for a long time can be a bit straining after a while, but for most uses the keyboard is more than good enough - at least compared to the tablets + Bluetooth keyboards I tried.
    I wouldn't say no to a better screen, a beefier processor, a small SSD (for battery and hibernate/resume speed) instead of the HDD and one more USB port, but I'd rather keep its current power level, form factor and price - things that an ultrabook. doesn't have.
  • 0 Hide
    velocityg4 , May 28, 2012 3:34 AM
    It'll be better when Toshiba stops selling computers all together. They have more bloatware and redundant utilities that poorly mimic built in Windows functions than any other laptop I have serviced.
  • 0 Hide
    livebriand , May 28, 2012 4:37 AM
    Darn it - there are times when netbooks are handy to have. I take my 11" thinkpad x120e to school with me sometimes and find that it's pretty handy at times - having two things onscreen at once, word processing, coding - all things that you can't really do with a tablet. Tablets just can't beat netbooks with productivity. The thing is, mine only cost about $450, but performance is easily enough for basic tasks - not like some of the atom ones that make you pull your hair out in frustration.
  • -2 Hide
    hp79 , May 28, 2012 5:34 AM
    cloaksterLemme know when ultrabooks go down below $300, until then my netbook is doing just fine

    You really want an Ultrabook with crappy Atom inside and 1" thick bulky plastic all around?
  • 0 Hide
    ProDigit10 , May 28, 2012 7:29 AM
    Toshiba is a largely unknown brand in the netbook world!
    The leaders have been Acer and Asus. Sony and HP actually sold outside of US borders. Toshiba didn't really.
  • 0 Hide
    damianrobertjones , May 28, 2012 8:58 AM
    ProDigit10Toshiba is a largely unknown brand in the netbook world!The leaders have been Acer and Asus. Sony and HP actually sold outside of US borders. Toshiba didn't really.


    Do you want a tablet with a protective cover and an external keyboard or one that sits inside a protective cover with the tablet that equals the size and weight of a netbook?

    Think about it
  • 0 Hide
    nforce4max , May 28, 2012 12:45 PM
    Toshiba= Liquid Crap

    They are built cheaply enough that even a three year old can break them down. Very poor cooling, horrible keyboard that is like typing on a loaf of bread, and worse they don't really run well either. Even their more expensive models are not that much better. Another crap brand.
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