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Another iPhone Lock Screen Bypass Trick Emerges

By - Source: The Next Web | B 28 comments

That was quick.

Apple just this week released a fix for the highly publicized lock screen bypass that was discovered in mid-February. Unfortunately, it seems another trick that allows similar access to the device has already been discovered.

According to The Next Web, this vulnerability is present in iOS 6.1.3. This version was just released earlier this week and contained a number of bug fixes along with a fix for the lock screen bypass. The method for bypassing the lock screen in that instance was pretty complicated. This time, it's much, much easier.

Before, bypassing the lock screen involved a complicated series of taps, interrupted emergency calls, and attempting to the turn the phone off. This time, all you need is for voice dialing to be enabled and to pull out the SIM card mid-call. This brings up the dialer and from there you can access photos, call history, and more.

Apple hasn't commented on this new hole but we'll keep you posted. For now, you can protect your phone by switching off voice dial in the passcode lock section in the Settings menu.

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Top Comments
  • 25 Hide
    infamouswoodster , March 21, 2013 12:26 PM
    @House70

    It's not a "fart" it's perfume , You are just Smelling it wrong...
  • 23 Hide
    blurr91 , March 21, 2013 12:22 PM
    Yet another "undocumented feature."
  • 22 Hide
    leo2kp , March 21, 2013 12:06 PM
    Who needs viruses when they create back doors for you?
Other Comments
    Display all 28 comments.
  • 22 Hide
    leo2kp , March 21, 2013 12:06 PM
    Who needs viruses when they create back doors for you?
  • 23 Hide
    blurr91 , March 21, 2013 12:22 PM
    Yet another "undocumented feature."
  • 9 Hide
    house70 , March 21, 2013 12:22 PM
    I said it before, Apple's farts stink like everyone else's.
    Man, do I hate it when I'm right...
    Or, do I?....
  • 25 Hide
    infamouswoodster , March 21, 2013 12:26 PM
    @House70

    It's not a "fart" it's perfume , You are just Smelling it wrong...
  • 14 Hide
    Pinhedd , March 21, 2013 12:39 PM
    Holy shit, Windows 98 was more secure than that.
  • 18 Hide
    freggo , March 21, 2013 12:41 PM
    nebunok....enough with the bashing....first, someone needs to put their dirty little hands on my phone in order to exploit it....that's not going to happen any time soon.


    Famous last words... :-)
  • 12 Hide
    curnel_D , March 21, 2013 12:45 PM
    nebunok....enough with the bashing....first, someone needs to put their dirty little hands on my phone in order to exploit it....that's not going to happen any time soon.

    You don't understand the implications. For instance, if you were to ever be arrested, you can be absolutely certain that your phone will have had attempts to bypass your passcode and/or recovering your personal data from it. Same can be said for TSA checkpoint, or realistically any time that it's a pain in the ass for someone to call a judge up and ask for a quick warrant on the spot. (Which rarely happens)

    What happens when they find something on your phone? Well, you might think it nullifies that evidence, and you'd be correct. But what it doesn't do is remove their ability to detain you for probable cause (PC), which can last long enough for a more in-depth warrant. If they find anything suspicious on your phone, whether it's incriminating or not, you suddenly fall within PC in most states, just because your phone as a glaring security flaw.
  • 12 Hide
    jackbling , March 21, 2013 12:54 PM
    curnel_DYou don't understand the implications. For instance, if you were to ever be arrested, you can be absolutely certain that your phone will have had attempts to bypass your passcode and/or recovering your personal data from it. Same can be said for TSA checkpoint, or realistically any time that it's a pain in the ass for someone to call a judge up and ask for a quick warrant on the spot. (Which rarely happens)What happens when they find something on your phone? Well, you might think it nullifies that evidence, and you'd be correct. But what it doesn't do is remove their ability to detain you for probable cause (PC), which can last long enough for a more in-depth warrant. If they find anything suspicious on your phone, whether it's incriminating or not, you suddenly fall within PC in most states, just because your phone as a glaring security flaw.


    Another scary situation is as it pertains to enterprise, or PHI; a fully encrypted device should not have this easy a bypass.

    When touting security as a selling point, you cannot afford to lose customer confidence.
  • 0 Hide
    blazorthon , March 21, 2013 12:58 PM
    PinheddHoly shit, Windows 98 was more secure than that.


    Have you ever heard of Konboot?
  • 4 Hide
    blazorthon , March 21, 2013 1:00 PM
    Even the similar vulnerabilities found in the S3 are at least difficult to do and I think the same can be said for the previous such flaw in iOS that 6.1.3 fixed. This is just plain easy if you get physical access to the phone such as a police confiscation or a theft.
  • 2 Hide
    christarp , March 21, 2013 1:14 PM
    PinheddHoly shit, Windows 98 was more secure than that.

    No it wasn't. You can bypass the log in screen on windows 98 through a series of steps as well.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9Jeit6cVaQ
  • 6 Hide
    internetlad , March 21, 2013 1:16 PM
    Boss: Everybody, we're switching over to iOS products because of their improved security

    Employees: Hooray!

    Bob: WTF Bill stop looking at my contacts.
  • 0 Hide
    flyflinger , March 21, 2013 1:45 PM
    ....and it'll be just as bloated and slow as Windows when they get all these holes plugged up.
  • 3 Hide
    tokencode , March 21, 2013 1:49 PM
    christarpNo it wasn't. You can bypass the log in screen on windows 98 through a series of steps as well.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9Jeit6cVaQ




    Yea but hat was back in... 1998 Laptops were just starting to become popular.
  • 0 Hide
    timmahh , March 21, 2013 1:56 PM
    I just tried this; when I pop out the sim my phone says no sim card, OK, then I see done, and i'm back at the lock screen..
  • 0 Hide
    Pinhedd , March 21, 2013 2:05 PM
    christarpNo it wasn't. You can bypass the log in screen on windows 98 through a series of steps as well.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9Jeit6cVaQ


    Yes I know, that's why I mentioned it. It's a long set of steps by comparison.

    There's no excuse for being able to bypass a lock screen like that anymore.
  • 0 Hide
    JackFrost860 , March 21, 2013 2:52 PM
    community testing?
  • -2 Hide
    generalclean , March 21, 2013 2:56 PM
    And this is only if you have a sim card you have access to to pull out. Most people with Iphones don't have access to the sim card unless they have an unlocked Iphone which the majority of the people don't.

    All this bashing just cuz it's an Apple product. Grow up people and get off the Apple Hater bandwagon! Show me one Tech product out there that uses an OS that doesn't have problems, any problems. You can't cuz there is not one. They'll fix this exploit too. Just like Windows does and Android also, with time. That's the way it works.

  • 2 Hide
    krowbar , March 21, 2013 3:17 PM
    Wasn't the government going to go all apple phones for employees? Seems the don't care about security. Kinda strange...
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