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Benchmark Results: I/O Performance

Three Generations Of 1.8" Hard Drives Benchmarked
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I/O performance is just about irrelevant for this type of hard drive. We mainly added it for the sake of comparison, as we test all hard drives on the same rig.

None of the drives is particularly fast at answering multiple I/O requests at the same time. Instead, the 1.8” drives were designed to be small, low on power, and efficient in delivering data in controlled environments, such as an Apple iPod classic.

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  • 17 Hide
    gsacks , March 28, 2010 3:25 PM
    babachooWhy would they continue to spend money on this technology when in 6-9 months you'll be able to get a 1TB SSD for $199? These 1.8" drives can't even compete with regular sized analog HDD's, much less SSD's. You wouldn't spend money to find a way to upgrade a Commodore 64 at this point in time, so why would they spend money on such obsolete technology like 1.8" drives?


    Put down the bottle. Terabyte SSDs in that price range are a lot more than 6 months away. And what the heck is an analog HDD? You should educate yourself before you post.
Other Comments
  • 17 Hide
    gsacks , March 28, 2010 3:25 PM
    babachooWhy would they continue to spend money on this technology when in 6-9 months you'll be able to get a 1TB SSD for $199? These 1.8" drives can't even compete with regular sized analog HDD's, much less SSD's. You wouldn't spend money to find a way to upgrade a Commodore 64 at this point in time, so why would they spend money on such obsolete technology like 1.8" drives?


    Put down the bottle. Terabyte SSDs in that price range are a lot more than 6 months away. And what the heck is an analog HDD? You should educate yourself before you post.
  • 9 Hide
    bobfrys , March 28, 2010 3:41 PM
    babachooWhy would they continue to spend money on this technology when in 6-9 months you'll be able to get a 1TB SSD for $199? These 1.8" drives can't even compete with regular sized analog HDD's, much less SSD's. You wouldn't spend money to find a way to upgrade a Commodore 64 at this point in time, so why would they spend money on such obsolete technology like 1.8" drives?

    Of course they cannot compete with 3.5 inch drives. That idea is just stupid. You are not going to put a 1.8 HDD in a desktop computer, that would be stupid. You spend money on a 1.8" drive becouse your laptop cannot FIT a 3.5 inch drive. There just isn't enough space. Plus, I cannot see 200 dollar SSD's in 6-9 months, maybe two years. Right now you are only getting 80 gigs for 250$. Just think before you post next time. And read the introduction. It explains what I just said about the laptop thing.
  • 0 Hide
    JohnnyLucky , March 28, 2010 4:26 PM
    When I saw the headline I wondered who still used the 1.8" drives and what they were still used for. Now I know. It appears their use is temporary.
  • -7 Hide
    jam1324 , March 28, 2010 6:27 PM
    Analog as anything with mechanical moving parts and digital being solid state type devices is what he would be refering to.
  • 9 Hide
    Anonymous , March 28, 2010 9:45 PM
    If that's what he meant by "analog," he's a silly man. Analog implies a continuous range of data values, whereas mechanical disk drives are, of course, digital.
  • 2 Hide
    dwave , March 28, 2010 10:57 PM
    Hey Jam, the drive may use a mechanical system, HOWEVER, the data is still stored digitally.
  • 2 Hide
    rbarone69 , March 29, 2010 2:09 PM
    Mechanical is not a synonym for analog


    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mechanical
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/analog

  • 0 Hide
    lamorpa , March 29, 2010 7:02 PM
    The data is stored as an analog charge. When read, a threshold is applied to decide on a high or low state. Sounds analog to me.
  • 1 Hide
    endif , March 29, 2010 8:22 PM
    http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/question7.htm

    A hard drive stores data by reversing the polarity of the surface of a hard disk. Since you can only have a North or South you only have a 1 or a 0. Because there is only two values and no range it is stored digital. This is also the reason as to why music will always sound best analog. There is a range that will always be cut out in digital.
  • -2 Hide
    Anonymous , March 29, 2010 10:48 PM
    @lamorpa:

    No, the data isn't stored as an analog charge. The data is stored as a magnetic polarity. While of course there will be some amount of variation in the level of polarization (because no device is perfect), this variation is ignored, and the data is interpreted as a 1 or 0. Thus, it's digital. By your definition, ANY digital device is in fact analog because of imperfection in the digital signals, but you'll have a hard time getting people to agree with you that all computers are analog.
  • -2 Hide
    Anonymous , March 29, 2010 10:51 PM
    @endif:

    The "analog music is better" trope is a myth. It would certainly be true if humans had an infinite range of frequency sensitivity, but we don't. We can only hear sounds up to about 20khz, and CD-quality audio is recorded at sufficiently high digital frequency to contain *all* the audio information up to 20khz.
  • -2 Hide
    endif , March 30, 2010 1:04 PM
    @Anon

    Shhhh..... it sounds better to dogs then!
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , March 31, 2010 3:41 PM
    I read the article just because I liked the picture of the bare 1.8" drive in the guy's hand......It was compelling though. Even more compelling was babchoo's comment....jeez...
  • 0 Hide
    ironic_sobriquet , March 31, 2010 5:10 PM
    gsacksTerabyte SSDs in that price range are a lot more than 6 months away.

    true, but the price does seem to be dropping extremely fast... probably by next year we'll see 512gb flash drives at consumer prices... though a terabyte drive is feasible NOW, I don't think we'll see them at consumer prices till Q4 2011~Q1 2012
    And what the heck is an analog HDD? You should educate yourself before you post.

    HAHA! he means punch tape!
  • 0 Hide
    number13 , March 31, 2010 6:33 PM
    Ijust bought a 1.8" 120G USB2 HDD, military grade, from Geeks and for portable storage it works great for me
  • 0 Hide
    HalfHuman , April 1, 2010 7:19 AM
    nice little gizmos. it's more linked to art than usability. :) 
    i beleive that hdds are to fragile and limited in terms of speed. they almost reached the end of the road almost. ssds are advancing so fast that i believe in less than 2 years the meachanical hdds will be almost obsolete... excepting probably the storage usage.
    if you ask me ssds will also reach the end of the road quite fast. i say that because we are already at 34nm technology for nand and you can't go much lower than 25nm and this will not give us the 1tb capacity. the life expectancy of nand goes down quite fast as you shrink them. ssds are nice but they will be followed up quite fast by something better.
    ps: just oredered a new Dell Precision desktop and can't to pair that p with a ssd. :) 
  • 0 Hide
    HalfHuman , April 1, 2010 7:20 AM
    this tiny hdds are an easy target for ssd. 3,5" and 2,5" are a bit more tougher target bu they will be replaced.
  • 0 Hide
    ashburner , April 2, 2010 5:49 PM
    I have the Toshiba MK2529GSG (250 gb) as the data drive in my HP Envy 15. It does a great job and it is silent, as far as I can notice. The primary drive is also 1.8" being an Intel X-18 G2 of 160GB.
  • 0 Hide
    ntrceptr , April 6, 2010 7:14 PM
    I'd love to see 2 of these 250GB drives put into an external enclosure (like our single drive external USBs) with a RAID 0 setup that is transparent to the end user. I dont know my USB specs but even if these required a second USB just for more power, I'd like to see how it performs. Toms hasn't done anything completely custom in a while...hint hint.
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