AMD Reports Quarterly Earnings for Q2 2011

AMD today announced revenue of $1.57 billion for the second quarter of 2011, a two percent sequential decrease and a five percent decrease year-over-year. Net income was $61 million while earnings per share (EPS) and operating income were $0.08 and $105 million, respectively. This is compared with a net income of $43 million or $0.06 per share for the same period in 2010 and $510 million or $0.68 per share for Q1 2011. AMD posted a non-GAAP net income of $70 million, and non-GAAP EPS and operating income were $0.09 and $114 million respectively.

AMD also talked about what it wants for the upcoming quarter, revealing that it expects to see revenue increase 10 percent, plus or minus two percent, sequentially for the third quarter of 2011. Bloomberg reports that the average analyst is predicting eight percent revenue growth for AMD in the next quarter.

"In the first half of 2011, AMD brought to market the most competitive client offerings in our history, reinforcing our position as a design and innovation powerhouse," Thomas Seifert, CFO and Interim CEO, said via statement yesterday "Today's computing experience is increasingly being defined by the ability to deliver brilliant multimedia and video content with all day battery life. Fusion APUs are ideal to meet this need, positioning AMD to gain unit market share in the mobile computing space."

AMD is still actively looking for a new Chief Executive Officer and Harry Wolin, senior vice president and general counsel at AMD, yesterday said that while finding a CEO is still top priority, the company is taking time to search for the best candidate as opposed to finding someone to fill the spot ASAP.

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  • deanjo
    GeekApprovedDesktop is dying fast.


    Not even close.
  • runswindows95
    Actually, the Llanos are perfect for real world use. The majority of PC's owners mostly use their systems to browse the web, email, word processing, tasks that really don't need a high end CPU. They do not play the newest games at the highest settings or convert video files 24/7. It's a decent CPU with the best integrated GPU on the market right now. Considering you can now buy a $400 to 500 computer (desktop or laptop) that can double as a light gaming system or a great HTPC, I say AMD is going in the right direction. Personally, for my next laptop I'm looking at the Llano's for all I do is word processing, watch online videos, and play mp3's. You can't get more real world usage than that.
  • Anonymous
    jescott418: This isn't 1995, back when everyone could use a faster computer. Here's how it breaks down:

    50% of users could get by fine with an e350 and not notice the "slow CPU"
    90% of users could get by fine with Llano and not notice the "slow CPU" or "slow GPU"
    5% of users actually need a powerful discrete GPU to do their uber-gaming
    5% of users need epic amounts of CPU power for intensive rendering tasks


    It's the same Intel fanboys who claim that Sandy Bridge supposedly beating Phenom II by 10-20% in real life is actually noticeable, are the same ones who claim Llano's GPU beating SB by 100-200% isn't noticeable.

    The bottom line: Llano is capable of doing things SB is not, SB is not capable of doing anything Llano isn't. Yet the paid Introlls like Anand state that Llano has "too much GPU", and SB is "balanced".
  • Other Comments
  • Anonymous
    AMD still going the wrong direction. I just sold a AMD Fusion based small Notebook with a E350 APU. Sure it had good graphic performance but what it gained in graphics it lost in CPU performance. Its like getting a bionic leg and still missing the other leg? Not many are being fooled by AMD's remaining its lineup to Fusion. Its sounds catchy but says nothing about how that helps the user? I don't see that AMD is really advancing and basically has just gone to combining chips (graphics and CPU) into one which has lowed the power consumption. But really has not helped either do better against Intel in real world use.
  • geekapproved
    The future is low power cpu/gpu and AMD trumps Intel by far in GPU. Expect cpu/gpu/arm on some upcoming AMD chips. This is the right direction. The right direction is not taking on Intel high end cpu's, but take it to them in the emerging markets, smartphones, pda's, tablets, etc.
    Desktop is dying fast.
  • runswindows95
    Actually, the Llanos are perfect for real world use. The majority of PC's owners mostly use their systems to browse the web, email, word processing, tasks that really don't need a high end CPU. They do not play the newest games at the highest settings or convert video files 24/7. It's a decent CPU with the best integrated GPU on the market right now. Considering you can now buy a $400 to 500 computer (desktop or laptop) that can double as a light gaming system or a great HTPC, I say AMD is going in the right direction. Personally, for my next laptop I'm looking at the Llano's for all I do is word processing, watch online videos, and play mp3's. You can't get more real world usage than that.