Skip to main content

Tom's Guide: How To Root the Samsung Galaxy S4

The Galaxy S4 has an extremely impressive spec sheet, which means developers and enthusiasts were particularly keen to gain root access to the device. This task has already been achieved and instructions are available on how to do it yourself, should you feel so inclined. There are many benefits to rooting your device. Should you decide to do it, the Tom's Guide team has put together a little 'How To' to show you the way.

Right off the bat, Samsung's newest smartphone has been put through the wringer by Android developers and enthusiasts. In no time at all, they made it possible to root the device for superuser access using the handy CF-Autoroot program by the excellent Chainfire. We'll show you how in this visual tutorial! Warning: Rooting gives you much more control and options for your device, but it does entail a bit of risk. Mistakes in the process can render your phone inoperable, and (at the very least) rooting your phone quite possibly voids the warranty. Consider this fair warning, but if you're adventurous enough to give it a shot, or already a trained hand at rooting other devices, then read on!How To: Rooting the Galaxy S4

Follow Tom's Guide on Twitter!

  • Apanzee
    Lol, we do root guides now?
    Reply
  • derekullo
    Next Week: Gaining Access to Intel Servers and Not Getting Caught
    Reply
  • _Cosmin_
    Derekullo: That`s most EASY: to have instant access to ANY computer just go work for US NSA/CIA/FBI or some other agency!
    Reply
  • razor512
    Why cant the smartphone companies just pre root the phones at the factory and save everyone the trouble?
    Reply
  • Apanzee
    11007392 said:
    Why cant the smartphone companies just pre root the phones at the factory and save everyone the trouble?

    In the world of Linux (and UNIX) ‘root’ is the supreme user level which has the rights to perform any task. It is similar to the Administrator user on a Windows PC. By default, only the Linux kernel and a small number of core utilities run as this superuser. But by ‘rooting’ your device (which means the root user level is available to all apps) then many of the security mechanisms are made null and void. This is because an app with root permission can modify any other part of the Android OS including the operating system itself, the kernel, and other apps.

    Therefor, by giving root to the average user right out of the box - it opens the unaware to security threats. Root is for power users only. 90% of people would never see any benefit, and possibly even some hindrance to day to day activities should the device be compromised.
    Reply