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Windows 8 Upgrade Program May Now Require Windows 7 Key

Prior to the release of Windows 8, Microsoft announced an upgrade program for those who purchased new computers in the months leading up to the release of the new OS. These people would, of course, be buying Windows 7 machines, which would technically be out of date in less than a year. However, Microsoft recognized that it needed a program in place to ensure sales of Windows 7 machines wouldn't nose dive in the six months before Windows 8 was launched. Redmond came up with an upgrade program that would allow anyone that purchased a Windows 7 machine after June 2012 to upgrade to Windows 8 for just $15. However, this week it emerged that folks hoping to upgrade may need to have their Windows 7 product key on hand.

According to CNet, Microsoft is randomly asking some users to enter their Windows 7 product activation key to verify that their machine qualifies for the upgrade deal. Lance Whitney writes that he tried to upgrade three machines, all of which were bought after June 2 of this year. While one computer updated to Windows 8 without incident (all Whitney had to do was enter the name and manufacturer of his computer and the date he bought it), the other two returned a message of apology informing Whitney his computers were not eligible for the upgrade. A week later, he tried again, and was asked to enter his Windows 7 product key as additional verification. This time around, his computers were approved for the upgrade to Windows 8.

Microsoft says the process to determine which users need a Windows 7 activation key and which users don't is dynamic and based on a number of factors. Redmond said if you can't verify your purchase using the online system, you'll need to contact customer support and provide them with proof of purchase.

Have any of you had problems updating to Windows 8 via the upgrade program? Let us know in the comments below.

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  • erick81
    I don't have a problem with MS trying to protect themselves but entering the key doesn't invalidate it I hope.
    Reply
  • marcus-san
    Just what Microsoft needs - to make it more difficult to purchase/activate an OS no one wants . . . If you have a Windows 7 key, KEEP IT, Don't upgrade.
    Reply
  • Non-Euclidean
    I am happy with W7 for now, but I might as well buy the upgrade, given the cheap cost during the current promotion.
    Reply
  • Hellbound
    Windows 8 offers nothing to my desktop experience.. I will continue to use Windows 7.
    Reply
  • bustapr
    I really dont think this would be of much benefit to microsoft. if a win7 pirate were to get some sort of conscience and by the upgrade to win8, then thats an extra $15 to microsoft. But if they prevent the easy upgrade to these users this way, then they would say "F-OFF" and go look for a pirated copy. which is $15-$100 less to microsoft. it would also inconvenience the users who retardedly ripped off the product key stamp on the (OEM) pc, or lost their own copy of it, making them either, stick with win7 or look for a pirated copy of win8 (this shouldnt be too hard). thats how I see the common consumer nowadays. if they have lots of money or somehow cant find a pirated copy they buy it. overall I dont see microsoft profiting from this decision at all.
    Reply
  • A Bad Day
    I would suggest those who haven't tried Win8, go to Best Buy or some other brick-and-mortar store and test out the Win8 computers.

    I don't like Win8 myself and plan on waiting until Win 8 SP1 or Win9, but I feel that some people here hates Win8 simply because other hate it as well.
    Reply
  • ben850
    A Bad DayI would suggest those who haven't tried Win8, go to Best Buy or some other brick-and-mortar store and test out the Win8 computers.I don't like Win8 myself and plan on waiting until Win 8 SP1 or Win9, but I feel that some people here hates Win8 simply because other hate it as well.
    It's dumb of Microsoft to only show the Metro UI in it's Win8 advertisements. It's obviously turning away many people. This feature has been nonexistent to me though, and I continue my Windows 8 usage just like if it was XP, Vista, or 7.
    Reply
  • hoofhearted
    Does that mean I loose my ability to run Windows 7 with that key? Just that risk added make Windows 8 even more of a deterrent.
    Reply
  • Avus
    Just to be clear, for now, any Win XP/Vista/Win7 users can buy Windows 8 PRO upgrade for only around $40USD!! (OEM Win8 Pro is around $150) This $15 deal is suppose for those who bought a new computer that comes with Win7 "recently". But as far as I know, the $15 Win8 offer site doesn't actually check for proof of purchase, so it is fair for MS to do something about it. Honestly, even if you are not qualify for the $15 deal, $40 for Win8 Pro is still a hell of a deal. I highly recommend to take this deal if you are currently running WinXP or SPECIALLY Vista. (of course the system should at least has a dual core CPU and 4GB RAM) It is actually a very fast/smooth OS. (upgrade from Vista, it kind of give u a hardware upgrade feel. It is that good) Of course everyone hate Metro and the disappearance of the Start button, but there is mod for that. I would NOT keep using WinXP/Vista just because of these 2 reason.
    Reply
  • emperornicon
    MicroSuck software Corp. the good windows product line died after August 22, 2005 with release of a global disaster called vista. after the fact the medical field has not embraced vista, se7en and even eight. their reason: Mission crital : resource hungy: Power hungry. with vista, 7, or 8 their is still many patches that need to be released, the Operating systems are in thier infancy.
    Reply