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Buyer Beware! Reports Of Fake Ryzen CPUs Popping Up On Retail Sites

There are a number of reports of fake Ryzen processors being sold by third party sellers on retail sites such as Amazon and eBay.

Although this is the first time we have seen fake Ryzen processor for sale, the scam isn’t new. In the past, we have seen counterfeit Core i7 processors sold by reputable retailers, as well as fake AMD A-Series A8-7600 processors making the rounds on Amazon.

In this case, it seems the crooks behind the caper used low-cost Celeron processors for the scam. The process works something like this: The scammer buys a handful of legitimate high-dollar AMD Ryzen 7 1800X processors, scans the CPU heatspreader, and then prints a sticker and applies it to the face of the fake CPU (in this case an old Celeron processor). The scammer returns the counterfeit processor to the box, reseals it, and then sells it on eBay / Amazon. This type of scam works because the counterfeit processor looks authentic from the outside of the package.

Sometimes, the fake product is actually meant to scam the retailer. As some of you are aware, retailers often place returned merchandise back in active inventory and resell it. It could also end up on Amazon’s Warehouse Deals site, after which the fake product ends up in the hands of a retail customer.

It's unfortunate that these things happen, but there are a few things you can do to prevent falling victim to this type of scam. Avoid third-party sellers on sites like Amazon, Newegg, Wal-Mart, and others. Pay for purchases with a credit card or services like PayPal that offer hassle-free refunds. Make sure you check the AMD website for tips on recognizing a fake processor or check the serial number on Intel’s website to verify the processor you purchased is legitimate.

  • kenjitamura
    Going to echo the sentiment of not purchasing from third party sellers on Amazon if they don't have extensive (3000+) positive feedback. I bought a monitor from a retailer with a few hundred positive reviews and never received it. Passes the shipping window and I leave them a message. No reply to the message and go back to their ratings page and find that as of a few days earlier it had received dozens of 1 star ratings about not getting the items.

    Also filed an a to z claim with Amazon for a refund and still have yet to see it in my bank account, been well over a week.
    Reply
  • papality
    If that review wasn't autoplay, I might even watch it.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    Yeah, caveat emptor on eBay and third-party Amazon. If the price look too good to be true, that's because it is.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    Orrrr.... is it Intel trying to steal AMD thunder...

    I know, I am a genius...
    Reply
  • redgarl
    19951181 said:
    Going to echo the sentiment of not purchasing from third party sellers on Amazon if they don't have extensive (3000+) positive feedback. I bought a monitor from a retailer with a few hundred positive reviews and never received it. Passes the shipping window and I leave them a message. No reply to the message and go back to their ratings page and find that as of a few days earlier it had received dozens of 1 star ratings about not getting the items.

    Also filed an a to z claim with Amazon for a refund and still have yet to see it in my bank account, been well over a week.

    Call them directly, Amazon don't waste time with scammers. They will refund you on the go. Happened to me in the past. They have the best customer service out there... since they don't pay taxes to governments >XD
    Reply
  • velocityg4
    On a side note. I really hate that Newegg and Walmart have third party sellers. If I wanted to deal with a third party I'd go to Amazon or eBay. If I go to Newegg or Walmart. It is because I want to deal with them.

    Of course the only reason I look at the Walmart website is to see if they carry something at my local store.
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    "Avoid third-party sellers on sites like Amazon, Newegg"

    Same thing with software, especially Windows OS.
    Reply
  • bgunner
    As if purchasing a vehicle or even trying to get one repaired isn't enough to scare the general public now we have, and have had for quite a while, other items, or should I say sellers, that we must do research on. It is bad enough we need to do so much homework on the right components for our needs but now it is as vital that we do homework on who has the product. And here I thought the homework ended when we graduated from school/collage.

    As for the third party sellers, I recently purchased a new mouse because mine was starting to act up. I went on Newegg and the one I wanted was only sold by some Chinese company that I have never heard of so I just bit the bullet and ordered the same mouse from Best Buy and it turned out cheaper by $25. For around 4-5 years now Newegg has leaned more and more on the third party sellers and this has most recently forced me to rethink on where I should purchase my hardware from. At least Best Buy is local and I trust them more than an anonymous Chinese vender.
    Reply
  • DookieDraws
    Recently while browsing Amazon, I have noticed a lot of sellers asking you to contact them BEFORE buying the item. These sellers are usually new to Amazon as well. That should be a dead giveaway right there. Still, it's ashame this kind of crap goes on, but we all know it will never stop. They'll find other ways to scam us.
    Reply
  • The Paladin
    more of these things happen the more I am happy I have a fry's electronics and a micro center store in my area.
    though eBay with PayPal doesn't mess around with scammers. so eBay is never out of touch either, but like crossing the street you need to look left and right for hidden car that may just try to run you down....
    Reply