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Apple Rejects Steam Link App For iOS Devices

Valve said that its Steam Link app, which allows PC gamers to stream content to their mobile products, won't come to iOS devices. Steam Link was supposed to be available for that platform, but Apple is said to have revoked its approval of the app shortly after Valve revealed it.

Steam Link is the latest of Valve's efforts to make Steam games accessible outside the usual PC setup. Remember the Steam Machine program? Steam Link achieves the same goal of letting PC gamers play something on their television sets (and in this case on-the-go) without having to invest in a full living room system. Instead, people could use the Android devices, Apple products, and wireless controllers they already own.

Yet it seems that Apple takes issue with something about Steam Link. Here's what Valve said in its email to the press:

On Monday, May 7th, Apple approved the Steam Link app for release. On Weds, May 9th, Valve released news of the app. The following morning, Apple revoked its approval citing business conflicts with app guidelines that had allegedly not been realized by the original review team. Valve appealed, explaining the Steam Link app simply functions as a LAN-based remote desktop similar to numerous remote desktop applications already available on the App Store. Ultimately, that appeal was denied leaving the Steam Link app for iOS blocked from release. The team here spent many hours on this project and the approval process, so we're clearly disappointed. But we hope Apple will reconsider in the future.

It's clear that Valve was blindsided by Apple's decision--the lead image for this article, which shows an iPhone running Steam Link with a third-party controller attached, is still live on the Steam Link web page. We doubt the company wants to use a device for which Steam Link isn't and might never be available to promote the service. Valve's continued use of the image is a bittersweet reminder of what could have been.

A beta version of the Steam Link app remains available for Android devices. The app is free to use, and while you can purchase a Steam Controller to use in conjunction with the service, you don't have to. Here's to hoping Apple product owners get the same options in the future.

  • Zaporro
    Serves well these apple fanboys, because nobody else with right mind would buy their overpriced crapPhones
    Reply
  • gggplaya
    Apple wants their cut, that's what it's all about. The same reason why Amazon Prime and Vudu app took forever to get on the apple tv.
    Reply
  • rantoc
    So i made the right choice to ditch apple products, this just confirms what a walled garden they try to be. Even Mac users on steam will love this...
    Reply
  • husker
    "Serves well these apple fanboys, because nobody else with right mind would buy their overpriced crapPhones"

    Um...who hurt you?
    Reply
  • hellwig
    20998791 said:
    Apple wants their cut, that's what it's all about. The same reason why Amazon Prime and Vudu app took forever to get on the apple tv.

    Exactly. Steam would essentially give the app away, and you would purchase games separately through Steam's own service. I'm sure Apple rejected, citing some clause in their app store regulations saying that all purchases have to go through Apple. So unless you could buy Steam games through the Apple app store, you can't play those same steam games on an Apple iPhone.

    If Apple made TVs, you'd only be able to watch iTunes videos with it.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Here's to hoping Apple product owners get the same options in the future.
    Here's to hoping Valve sues the crap out of Apple and breaks open their walled garden, forever.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    20999408 said:
    Um...who hurt you?
    I'm not going to defend the slander on apple fanboys, but I do hold Apple principally responsible for turning computers from glorious machines you build, upgrade, control, own, and manage, to disposable, locked-down content delivery appliances.

    I think we could all see this pitched battle coming, a million miles away. Valve might be our last, best chance to break the hegemony Apple, Amazon, Google, and Microsoft are trying to impose on users and developers, alike.
    Reply
  • bgunner
    20999408 said:
    Um...who hurt you?

    Apple hurt me! I foolishly used iTunes for many of my child's movies and I can not play them on my T.V. without either hooking up a Laptop or Desktop to it OR buying a different Apple device in order to play them on the T.V.. So Apple hurts those that do not "Buy" into there ecosystem. I was highly disturbed to find I could not stream any of my iTunes movies on my smart T.V. without paying more money, this is not to mention iTunes is the only Apple product that is in my home because well, they don't play well with others and on top of that they charge outrageous prices for there products. Apple is not for me and this hurts the consumers and not apple because they get there money then don't care.
    Reply
  • Lostinlodos
    iTunes’ tos is quite accurate in what you can use for viewing. Or did you just expect Apple to be different than anyone else?
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21000573 said:
    iTunes’ tos is quite accurate in what you can use for viewing. Or did you just expect Apple to be different than anyone else?
    Depends. Are you looking at it from Apple's perspective, or from the perspective that it's a platform for hundreds of millions of users and just how much control one corporation should have over that?

    Should users of their devices really have no choice but to accept the services and their terms which Apple offers or do without? You can say that people who aren't okay with that shouldn't buy Apple products, but not everyone who buys an iDevice knows they're selling their soul.
    Reply