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Intel Debuts New Atom System-on-Chip Processor

Intel is pushing the Atom into more spaces that just netbooks. One of the new products introduced at IDF is a new Atom-based System-on-Chip that Intel hopes to make it into in-vehicle infotainment systems for cars, smart grid devices and IP media phones.

At an IDF keynote, Intel launched “Tunnel Creek,” a new Atom E600 SoC processor. One particular processor detailed is codenamed “Stellarton,” which consists of the Atom E600 processor paired with an Altera FPGA on a multi-chip package that provides additional flexibility for customers who want to incorporate proprietary I/O or acceleration.

Intel also introduced the Atom processor CE4200, formerly codenamed “Groveland,” which is designed to integrate the Internet experience with TV.

The SoC includes 3-D support, H.264 high-definition encoding capability for usage models such as “sync-and-go” between networked consumer electronics and portable devices, and multiple input stream support to enable the design of cost-effective home gateway appliances. The SoC also features smart power management capabilities that automatically help to turn off parts of the chip when not in use.

Other things announced at this keynote were the launch of the Intel AppUp store and a surprising demo of the Dell convertible tablet transformer.

Marcus Yam
Marcus Yam served as Tom's Hardware News Director during 2008-2014. He entered tech media in the late 90s and fondly remembers the days when an overclocked Celeron 300A and Voodoo2 SLI comprised a gaming rig with the ultimate street cred.
  • nxym
    yea more atoms.
    Reply
  • eyefinity
    But can it play....3d deathchase?
    Reply
  • hellwig
    So, I see the clockspeed isn't getting any faster, and I haven't heard of any architectural changes to the Atom core, so.... are these any faster than the Atoms of 2 years ago? I guess they're going after the tablet market, where they feel their old Atom can compete with ARM.
    Reply
  • dman3k
    Yawn... I believe nVidia's Tegra 3 has better graphics and lesser power consumption.
    Reply
  • knownballer
    This has been bugging me for some time now: what's the difference between a soc and amd's apu? They they say the apu is a fully intergrated gpu but it still looks like a soc to me. Am I missing something? Tom's can you guys do an article on the differences between amd's upcoming apu, the cell processor and soc architectures like arm.
    Reply
  • konjiki7
    So your asking whats the difference System on a chip vs an APU cpu and gpu combo?

    Reply
  • lamorpa
    So your asking whats the difference Systemonachip vs an APU and combo?
    Reply
  • cyrusfox
    knownballerThis has been bugging me for some time now: what's the difference between a soc and amd's apu? They they say the apu is a fully intergrated gpu but it still looks like a soc to me. Am I missing something? Tom's can you guys do an article on the differences between amd's upcoming apu, the cell processor and soc architectures like arm.
    Agreed, I second this, I would really like to know the fundamental difference.
    Reply
  • SoC is somewhat nebulous. It just means it's a highly integrated chip with 3-4 or more of CPU, GPU, 3D acceleration, video decode/encode, IO (USB, PCI, and/or other), RAM, ROM, etc... I think to really be considered a SoC you would want at least CPU, GPU, ROM, and IO.
    Reply
  • erm come on peeps, system on a chip is what it sounds like, it more or less a complete system on a chip with the memory/external storage/bus connector/CPU/display functions integrated into a single package for instance with a SoC you can wire connection from the chip directly to a USB port without the need for a controller board inbetween

    an APU is just another way to addressee an integrated CPU and GPU, it allows you to ask the APU to do something and let the chip decide whether to offload to GPGPU or CPU
    Reply