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Mass Effect Legendary Edition System Requirements: The Break Your GPU Needs

Illusive Man in Mass Effect Legendary Edition
(Image credit: EA)

Mass Effect's Legendary Edition remaster just got its release date set for May 14th, and the community is hard at work pulling every detail out of EA that the studio will let out into the wild. Among those uncovered details are the trilogy's system requirements, and suffice it to say, it's the much-needed break our systems need.

EA published the following system requirements:

Mass Effect Legendary Edition Minimum PC Requirements:

  • Operating System: 64-bit Windows 10 
  • CPU: Intel Core i5 3570 or AMD FX-8350
  • Memory: 8 GB System Memory 
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 760, AMD Radeon 7970 / R9280X 
  • GPU Memory: 2 GB Video Memory 
  • Storage: At least 120 GB of free space
  • Operating System: 64-bit Windows 10
  • CPU: Intel Core i7-7700 or AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
  • Memory: 16 GB System Memory
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 1070, AMD Radeon Vega 56. 
  • GPU Memory: 4 GB Video Memory
  • Storage: At least 120 GB of free space

These requirements aren't steep, which is much appreciated in a day and age where games are becoming increasingly taxing on our systems -- in a time when it's nearly impossible to get your hands on a powerful graphics card for any reasonable amount of money.

Although nobody gets away with less than 120GB of free space, a good experience can be had with modest graphics cards and old CPUs. Better hardware will, of course, help you make the most out of the unlocked framerate, though. EA is upping the textures to be 4K ready, and 21:9 support is also being added for fans of ultrawide displays.

Of course, none of this is all too surprising. The studio decided that Mass Effect Legendary Edition was best remastered on the Unreal Engine 3 the original games were built on. Using UE4  would have required a full remake instead of a polishing up become far too big a task. As a result, it's Mass Effect 1 that will benefit most from the remastering process.

Meanwhile, although the intention was for all DLC to be included with the Legendary Edition trilogy, Mass Effect 1's Pinnacle Station DLC won't make the cut. The reason here is simple: the original source code wasn't backed up properly and is now corrupted, and remaking the DLC isn't within the scope of work EA was able to put into the project. 

Niels Broekhuijsen
Niels Broekhuijsen is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He covers hardware news on all components and peripherals.
  • digitalgriffin
    Meanwhile, although the intention was for all DLC to be included with the Legendary Edition trilogy, Mass Effect 1's Pinnacle Station DLC won't make the cut. The reason here is simple: the original source code wasn't backed up properly and is now corrupted, and remaking the DLC isn't within the scope of work EA was able to put into the project.

    Someone in IT should be fired over that. (Seriously)

    3-2-1 (3 backup copies. 2 local, 1 remote storage) Heck, I even I run 3 backups of everything at my own house.

    Oh BTW: Nice upgrade. I might actually want to purchase the game again.
    Reply
  • d0x360
    Why would anyone have thought you would need to be running high end hardware to run this at high frame rates? Its nothing more than a texture upres and some lighting changes and some minor model improvements (higher poly faces).

    Fans already did this stuff (except the faces) with customer textures and they added ssao and other effects with reshade.

    Dont get me wrong, this looks like a great package and I'll be buying it day 1 provided it's not full of bugs... Its just not what I had hoped for.

    I'd prefer a halo 1/2 anniversary style remaster. Especially since we are 2 console generations away from the original games.

    Shame they lost the source for a DLC but it's not a huge deal.
    Reply
  • VforV
    CPU: Intel Core i7-7700 or AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
    Am I the only one having issues with this unbalanced requirement? 😕

    Those 2 CPUs are not equal at all... Ryzen 3700x is much better than i7 7700, clearly.
    They could not find a lower core/performance AMD CPU to match it with i7 7700? Like a Ryzen 2500x/2600x?
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    digitalgriffin said:
    Someone in IT should be fired over that. (Seriously)

    3-2-1 (3 backup copies. 2 local, 1 remote storage) Heck, I even I run 3 backups of everything at my own house.

    Oh BTW: Nice upgrade. I might actually want to purchase the game again.
    This is EA we're talking about. I imagine they just threw it on some DVDs and called it a day.
    Reply
  • emike09
    Sad, give me ray tracing and DLSS!!!
    Reply
  • Chung Leong
    emike09 said:
    Sad, give me ray tracing and DLSS!!!

    I want a better ending.
    Reply
  • Gillerer
    VforV said:
    Am I the only one having issues with this unbalanced requirement? 😕

    Those 2 CPUs are not equal at all... Ryzen 3700x is much better than i7 7700, clearly.
    They could not find a lower core/performance AMD CPU to match it with i7 7700? Like a Ryzen 2500x/2600x?

    It's not an imbalanced requirement if the game relies primarily on one or a couple of main threads. (And that's what all old games used to be. And Unreal Engine 3. Updating textures, lighting etc. doesn't necessarily change the programming - at least enough to spread the load enough to matter.)

    The point of the requirements isn't to give equivalent CPU power between AMD and Intel (that's what CPU performance reviews, comparisons and roundups are for). The game publisher is just indicating the lowest product that will provide acceptable performance in this title.

    Downgrading the 3000 series Ryzen (with good single-thread performance) to any previous generation AMD CPU (with lackluster IPC and higher latencies) would make the single- and few-threaded performance much worse than any Skylake-based Intel Core i7 (4+ cores and 8+ threads).
    Reply
  • VforV
    Gillerer said:
    The point of the requirements isn't to give equivalent CPU power between AMD and Intel (that's what CPU performance reviews, comparisons and roundups are for). The game publisher is just indicating the lowest product that will provide acceptable performance in this title.

    Downgrading the 3000 series Ryzen
    (with good single-thread performance) to any previous generation AMD CPU (with lackluster IPC and higher latencies) would make the single- and few-threaded performance much worse than any Skylake-based Intel Core i7 (4+ cores and 8+ threads).
    Ok then, Ryzen 2000s are below that, but I really don't believe that "the lowest product that will provide acceptable performance" for the recommended specs is only the Ryzen 3700x...
    Ryzen 3300x is a 4c/8t, just like the i7 7700 and has the same single core performance as 3700x (sometimes even better).

    I have a Ryzen 3600 and at stock it matches the i7 7700 single core performance and my 3600 OC-ed to 4.4Ghz on all cores matches the i7 7700k OC at 5Ghz in single core (and destroys it in multi core) and as a side note, it also matches the Intel i9 9900KS single core stock. Would be the same for a Ryzen 3300x stock vs stock and OC vs OC (but equal in multi core), for this game.

    So I call that recommendation BS, it should have been: i7 7700 and Ryzen 3300x.
    Reply
  • kerberos_20
    VforV said:
    Am I the only one having issues with this unbalanced requirement? 😕

    Those 2 CPUs are not equal at all... Ryzen 3700x is much better than i7 7700, clearly.
    They could not find a lower core/performance AMD CPU to match it with i7 7700? Like a Ryzen 2500x/2600x?
    its probably single core performance issue here
    Reply
  • VforV
    kerberos_20 said:
    its probably single core performance issue here
    There is no issue for a Ryzen 3300x, which is equal to a 3700x, in single core performace.
    This is an issue with the statement that you need a 3700x for recommended specs, when in fact a 3300x would suffice, being equal to a i7 7700. Like I said above...
    Reply