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Cooler Master Launches New 120mm Fans That Promise To Reduce Unwanted Vibrations

Cooler Master Mobius 120P ARGB
(Image credit: Cooler Master)

Cooler Master has launched a new lineup of performance optimized fans called Mobius featuring both non-RGB and ARGB flavors in a 120 mm form factor. Cooler Master has employed a new architecture it is calling Ring Blade Design, that connects all the fan blades together. This reportedly improves airflow, while eliminating unwanted vibrations at the same time.

The company says the fans are available today, but didn't make pricing immediately available. 

Cooler Master is releasing two 120 mm variants right now, in both a standard and an ARGB version, called the Mobius 120 and the 120P ARGB. The Mobius 120 will feature a fully blacked out look with a black shroud and even dark fan. The RGB variant will feature ARGB lighting with frosted fan blades to increase the lighting dispersion. 

Despite the lighting differences, the ARGB model is a higher performing on paper compared to the Mobius 120, as well. The ARGB model features a maximum speed of 2400 RPM and a maximum noise level of 30 dBA, with a CFM rating of 75.2. The non-ARGB model on the other hand features a lower fan speed of 2050RPM and a maximum air flow rating of 63.1 CFM. But thanks to the lower fan speed, the noise level is significantly reduced to 22.6 dBA.

Both fans are rated for up to 200,000 hours of use, and require 4-pin PWM output to function. The ARGB variant will require an additional 3-pin ARGB header to be present as well for lighting functionality.

The Mobius series of fans are reportedly very stable under load in a number of different orientations. The fans use a new Ring Blade Design that connects all the fan blades together at the tips with a ring, which can reduce unwanted air turbulence that can vibrate the spinning blades.

For even more stability, Cooler Master has employed the use of dynamic loop bearings as well, which keeps the bearings better lubricated compared to more traditional methods. This in turn, improves the reliability of the bearings and improves fan stability. Cooler Master has also added a magnetic ring to the bearing shaft to prevent the fan from tilting in unorthodox orientations (such as 45 degree angles).

All these factors combined have allowed Cooler Master to tune the Mobius fans to a 6dBA noise level or lower, without compromising performance. These fans are designed to function both as chassis fans and static pressure fans for CPU coolers, hard drive cooling and radiators.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • tennis2
    Love the product photo. Not showing anything except RGB.

    2000rpm is plenty fast for a 120mm fan. Somewhere around the 1500rpm range is where fans start to become audibly noticeable in most environments. If you need more airflow than that, time to re-evaluate your cooling.

    I do wish more companies would release 30mm thick fans like the Phanteks T30.
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    tennis2 said:
    Love the product photo. Not showing anything except RGB.

    2000rpm is plenty fast for a 120mm fan. Somewhere around the 1500rpm range is where fans start to become audibly noticeable in most environments. If you need more airflow than that, time to re-evaluate your cooling.

    I do wish more companies would release 30mm thick fans like the Phanteks T30.
    Why bother showing you the single thing that makes these fans stand out (blade attachment ring)?
    Look at the pretty lights! Thats all anyone cares about these days. /s
    Reply
  • BillyBuerger
    I feel like I've seen fans like this before. Can't recall where. Looks like SPCR needs to verify their claims... Oh wait... Damn.

    Fan noise is subjective. My 120mm fans are at 500rpm right now which is mostly inaudible unless I get real close. 700rpm is definitely noticeable and louder than I would like to deal with under normal conditions. 1500rpm would be freakin' annoying.
    Reply
  • tennis2
    BillyBuerger said:
    I feel like I've seen fans like this before. Can't recall where.
    Fairly common to see them on GPUs. Asus comes to mind.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    tennis2 said:
    Love the product photo. Not showing anything except RGB.

    2000rpm is plenty fast for a 120mm fan. Somewhere around the 1500rpm range is where fans start to become audibly noticeable in most environments. If you need more airflow than that, time to re-evaluate your cooling.

    I do wish more companies would release 30mm thick fans like the Phanteks T30.
    I wish some would make thicker fans as well. But then some radiators wouldn't fit in cases.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    tennis2 said:
    Fairly common to see them on GPUs. Asus comes to mind.

    Yes. This profile blades tend to flex and deform easily, reducing their effectiveness. This helps reduce that flex. It also reduces wing tip losses between the fan edge and the housing gap. (In the form of reverse vortices).

    But CM's weakness has been in poor foil design and rifle bearings. I mean they arent the worse. I own like 12. But they aren't Corsair in terms of noise or noctua in overall performance.
    Reply
  • Darkbreeze
    How neat. They finally claim to do what Noctua has been doing for years and years. Except, they are still about 8-10db louder than any of the premium Noctua line. CM is a marketing gimmick specialist and a mediocre manufacturer and that's about it.
    Reply