Where to Buy Intel Core i9-13900K, i5-13600K and i7-13700K CPUs

Intel Raptor Lake for Sale
(Image credit: Shutterstock, Intel)

Intel's 13th Generation "Raptor Lake" CPUs bring new levels of performance to your desktop, taking both the gaming and application performance crowns and outperforming AMD's pricier Ryzen 7000 series while actually costing significantly less. And when you combine the exorbitant price of the motherboards and memory you need for AMD ($290 and up), Intel looks like an even better value for your money.

In our review of the Intel Core i9-13900K and Core i5-13600K, we noted that the former chip hit a full 155 fps on our 1440p gaming suite, the highest we've measured and miles ahead of any AMD Ryzen chips. What's surprising is that the Core i5-13600K and Core i7-13700K were only a few fps behind and beat every top-of-the-line AMD chip. We were also able to overclock the Core i5 and i9 models to a blistering 5.6 GHz, a record for us with watercooled systems. 

The first three Raptor Lake chips have just launched in the Intel Core i9-13900K, Core i7-13700K and Core i5-13600K. There are also KF versions (ex: 13900KF) that cost a few dollars less and omit the integrated graphics. Because these chips are brand new, not every store will have them in stock or even have them listed yet. To help you purchase, we've browsed the top online retailers in the U.S. to check their stock and pricing.

Intel Core i9-13900K: Where to Buy

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RetailerModelPriceAvailability
AmazonCore i9-13900KF$743In Stock
B&HCore i9-13900KF$629Pre Order
B&HCore i9-13900K$659Pre Order
NeweggCore i9-13900K$659Back Ordered
NeweggCore i9-13900KF$629Sold Out
Best BuyCore i9-13900K$689Sold Out
Best BuyCore i9-13900KF$659Sold Out
eBayCore i9-13900K$797In Stock (maybe)

Intel's top-of-the-line CPU, the Core i9-13900K / KF, sports 24 cores and 32 threads with a maximum boost clock of 5.8 GHz on its 8 performance cores. At press time, the Core i9-13900K and 13900KF were both selling for way above their $589 / $564 MSRPs and were not readily available at most of the major retailers. 

It's important to note the difference between "sold out," "back-ordered" and "pre-order."  Both back-ordered and pre-order products can be bought today, but won't ship until the merchant receives stock.

Intel Core i5-13600K: Where to Buy

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RetailerModelPriceAvailability
AmazonCore i5-13600KF$309In Stock
AmazonCore i5-13600K$339In Stock
NeweggCore i5-13600KF$309In Stock
NeweggCore i5-13600K$329In Stock
Best BuyCore i5-13600K$339In Stock
Best BuyCore i5-13600KF$309In Stock
B&HCore i5-13600K$329Pre Order
B&HCore i5-13600KF$309Pre Order

Like its immediate predecessor, the Core i5-12600K, the Core i5-13600K is the best value in Intel's stack. For an MSRP of $319 / $294 (for the K and KF models), the Core i5-13600K provides 14 cores (6P + 8E) and 20 threads, along with a boost clock of 5.1 GHz. We had no issue overclocking this chip to 5.6 GHz on all of its high-performance cores, and we've heard that even 5.7 GHz is common.

Fortunately, all the major retailers have both the KF and K varieties available. The best price is $309 for the KF, which you can grab at Amazon, Newegg, Best Buy, or B&H. However, you'll note that the $309 is still higher than the $294 KF MSRP, while the $329 price for the 13600K is $10 more than its MSRP.

Intel Core i7-13700K: Where to Buy

Swipe to scroll horizontally
RetailerModelPriceAvailability
AmazonCore i7-13700K$472In Stock
AmazonCore i7-13700KF$418In Stock
NeweggCore i7-13700K$449In Stock
NeweggCore i7-13700KF$429In Stock
Best BuyCore i7-13700K$489In Stock
Best BuyCore i7-13700KF$459In Stock
B&HCore i7-13700KF$429Pre Order
B&HCore i7-13700K$439Pre Order

If you want a few more threads than you get from the Core i5-13600K but can't afford the expensive and hard-to-get Core i9-13900K/F, the Core i7-13700K might be for you. This chip carries an MSRP of $409 / $384 for the K and KF versions while sporting 16 cores  (8P + 8E cores) and 24 threads. Its stock boost clock maxes out at 5.4 GHz.

While it's easy to find the Core i7-13700K in stock, it's a bit higher than the MSRP. The best deal is at Amazon, which has the Core i7-13700KF for just  $418 (opens in new tab).However, if you want the version with integrated graphics, your best bet is B&H, which has it on preorder for $439 (opens in new tab).

Which Raptor Lake Processor Should I Get?

Below we've got at able comparing the three CPUs. As you pay more, you get more cores, higher boost clocks and more cache. However, all of the Raptor Lake CPUs support DDR4 or DDR5 RAM and PCIe 5.0 SSDs.

Swipe to scroll horizontally
Row 0 - Cell 0 MSRPCores / Threads (P+E)P-Core Base / Boost Clock (GHz)E-Core Base / Boost Clock (GHz)Cache (L2/L3)TDP / PBP / MTPMemory
Core i9-13900K / KF$589 (K) - $564 (KF)24 / 32 (8+16)3.0 / 5.82.2 / 4.368MB (32+36)125W / 253WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-5600
Core i7-13700K / KF$409 (K) - $384 (KF)16 / 24 (8+8) 3.4 / 5.42.5 / 4.254MB (24+30)125W / 253WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-5600
Core i5-13600K / KF$319 (K) - $294 (KF)14 / 20 (6+8)3.5 / 5.12.6 / 3.944MB (20+24)125W / 181WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-5600

As  you can see in the chart below, all of the chips delivered AMD-beating frame rates at 1440p. We were also able to overclock them up to 5.5 or 5.6 GHz without breaking a sweat.

Intel Raptor Lake 1440p Gaming Results

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Ultimately, the CPU you choose should be based on your budget and how many threads you think you need. Because for gaming and lightly-threaded apps, you get almost as strong performance from the Core i5 chip as the Core i9.

Also, keep in mind that you'll need a motherboard for your Raptor Lake chip. The good news is that all of these CPUs use Intel's Socket 1170 to connect so they are fully compatible with its older and cheaper 600 series motherboards. See our list of the best motherboards to help you choose.

Avram Piltch is Tom's Hardware's editor-in-chief. When he's not playing with the latest gadgets at work or putting on VR helmets at trade shows, you'll find him rooting his phone, taking apart his PC or coding plugins. With his technical knowledge and passion for testing, Avram developed many real-world benchmarks, including our laptop battery test.
  • tommo1982
    Going 13th gen i5 Intel with B660 DDR5 motherboard is as expensive as AM5. Why buy a DDR4 when you're buying the latest CPU. Actually Ryzen 5 7600X is slightly cheaper than i5-13600KF.
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    They look inflated in price from what I was expecting (not the 1K tray price, BTW).

    Can you guys do a mini price-check on both Ryzen 7K and 13K parts, please?

    I think there will be an interesting price bout between them and we'll need to keep an eye out XD

    Regards,
    Reply
  • DavidLejdar
    According to a previous article on here*, a DDR4 rig will see lower multi-core perfomance than in the mentioned benchmarks with DDR5.

    Not saying that such means that it isn't great performance. And it may still be a great option for many who may want to upgrade their Alder Lake rig, or who are looking for an affordable solid build, as it sure is cheaper to go for a DDR4 motherboard and the RAM (and in such case one could also consider Ryzen 7 5800X3D on AM4, if primarily interested in gaming).

    But if looking for top performance, it is with DDR5 now - and the lowest price is pretty much the same for Intel and AMD motherboards.

    As for the availability, I suppose I am quite lucky that there is a company a stroll away, which ships computers and components far and wide, and also has a store-front at their warehouse, where they have all the new Intel and also Ryzen CPUs.

    *
    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/ddr5-boosts-raptor-lake-cpu-multi-core-performance-by-20-percent-in-new-benchmarks
    Reply
  • ikernelpro4
    DavidLejdar said:
    According to a previous article on here*, a DDR4 rig will see lower multi-core perfomance than in the mentioned benchmarks with DDR5.

    Not saying that such means that it isn't great performance. And it may still be a great option for many who may want to upgrade their Alder Lake rig, or who are looking for an affordable solid build, as it sure is cheaper to go for a DDR4 motherboard and the RAM (and in such case one could also consider Ryzen 7 5800X3D on AM4, if primarily interested in gaming).

    But if looking for top performance, it is with DDR5 now - and the lowest price is pretty much the same for Intel and AMD motherboards.

    As for the availability, I suppose I am quite lucky that there is a company a stroll away, which ships computers and components far and wide, and also has a store-front at their warehouse, where they have all the new Intel and also Ryzen CPUs.

    *
    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/ddr5-boosts-raptor-lake-cpu-multi-core-performance-by-20-percent-in-new-benchmarks
    Who cares about that though. I mean at least you can use DDR4, whereas AMD completely miscalculated the market.

    Nobody, that purchased DDR4 recently will throw their kits away just because of the CPU, that's mentally crazy.
    I purchased DDR4 premium RAM, there's no reason to look at DDR5 for at least half a decade after upgrading the R5 1600.
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    DavidLejdar said:
    According to a previous article on here*, a DDR4 rig will see lower multi-core performance than in the mentioned benchmarks with DDR5.

    Not sure that is born out in testing.

    In the recent Gigabyte Aorus Master Z790 review the charts showed the MSI Tomahawk DDR4 Z790 board leading in many of the tests and only a few edge cases where the DDR5 made a large difference.

    Gigabyte Z790 Aorus Master Review: USB Party in a Box - Benchmarks and Final Analysis
    I think DDR4 is still the value choice.

    i5 13400, DDR4 and a B660 board could be a very sweet spot for bang-for-buck buyers.

    If I had an AM4 board I'd purchase a Ryzen 7 5800X3D and sit happy a few more years.
    Reply
  • rtoaht
    tommo1982 said:
    Going 13th gen i5 Intel with B660 DDR5 motherboard is as expensive as AM5.

    That’s just not true. AM5 is still more expensive. Also, 13th gen supports DDR4 too.

    tommo1982 said:
    Why buy a DDR4 when you're buying the latest CPU.
    Because many people already have DDR4. Also the performance difference between DDR4 and DDR5 is much less than the price difference between the platforms (motherboard + memory).

    tommo1982 said:
    Actually Ryzen 5 7600X is slightly cheaper than i5-13600KF.

    It is not. CPU price is similar while platform cost is cheaper for 13600kF. But even then this comparison is irrelevant since 13600kf handily beats the even more expensive 7700x. That’s why both 7600x and 7700x are DOA. People getting a 14 core 13600kF won’t need to worry about upgrading at least in the next 4 years.
    Reply
  • ikernelpro4
    Co BIY said:

    If I had an AM4 board I'd purchase a Ryzen 7 5800X3D and sit happy a few more years.
    Avoid thr 5800X3D. Get the 5900X and profit from the much higher base and turbo clock speed as well as most importantly the higher core & thread count.

    x3D 8C/16T slower and more expensive.
    5900X 12C/24T(!) as well as faster and cheaper

    You have a dGPU, why do you need an APU/iGPU anyway.
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    ikernelpro4 said:
    Avoid thr 5800X3D. Get the 5900X and profit from the much higher base and turbo clock speed as well as most importantly the higher core & thread count.

    x3D 8C/16T slower and more expensive.
    5900X 12C/24T(!) as well as faster and cheaper

    Point taken. My AMD plan would also assume you have an older lesser chip otherwise even the upgrade isn't advisable.
    Reply
  • ikernelpro4
    Co BIY said:
    Point taken. My AMD plan would also assume you have an older lesser chip otherwise even the upgrade isn't advisable.
    Also not all AM4 boards are alike.

    You can't just place a 5800X3D or 5900X into B350 Pc mate (as far as I know).

    MSI's board website is utter <sadly no vulgar since a power-trip mod sent me a warning for the word sh-t, yea really pathetic>.

    ASRock seems very solid, they seem to provide updates for older board compatibility.
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    My local Microcenter appears to have plenty of stock of the i7 13700K (at $399) and i5 13600K (at $299).

    13900K out of stock but listed at $569.

    I know that's not helpful to a lot of people but indicates to me that there is no need to overpay for these chips even this short after release.
    Reply