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AMD Ryzen 3000 Series Matisse CPUs Listed With Specs

Russian price tracking website e-Katalog has listed what is purportedly AMD's complete upcoming Ryzen 3000-series processor lineup. It’s notable that E-Katalog doesn't sell products. Instead, it lists pricing for a range of items, like household and computer equipment, electronics, home, and office products, much like PCPartPicker.

While the specifications fall in line with the recent AdoredTV leak, these listings could be placeholders and should be taken with a grain of salt. However, if there is any truth to the listings, AMD could really shake up the processor market with the new Ryzen chips.


The Ryzen 3000-series processors, allegedly codenamed Matisse, are purportedly based around AMD's Zen 2 processor microarchitecture, which makes them the successors to the current Pinnacle Ridge processors. However, unlike Pinnacle Ridge which was produced with GlobalFoundries' 12nm node, Matisse chips would be manufactured by TSMC on the 7nm production process.

AMD Ryzen 3000 Series Specifications

According to rumors, the third-generation Ryzen processors will reportedly receive both core and frequency upgrades. AMD is expected to bump up the Ryzen 3 3000 models four cores up to six, the Ryzen 5 3000 chips from six to eight, and the Ryzen 7 3000 parts from eight to 12.

The introduction of Ryzen 9 3000 processors with up to 16 cores and 32 threads is perhaps the most surprising aspect of the recent leaks because it would effectively push the mainstream AM4 platform into Threadripper territory, much like Intel has encroached upon its own HEDT lineup with its mainstream Core i9-9900K.

ProcessorCores / ThreadsBase / Boost ClockTDPPriceDebut
Ryzen 3 33006 / 123.2 / 4.0GHz50W$99CES
Ryzen 3 3300X6 / 123.5 / 4.3GHz65W$129CES
Ryzen 5 36008 / 163.6 / 4.4GHz65W$178CES
Ryzen 5 3600X8 / 164.0 / 4.8GHz95W$229CES
Ryzen 7 370012 / 243.8 / 4.6GHz95W$299CES
Ryzen 7 3700X12 / 244.2 / 5.0GHz105W$329CES
Ryzen 9 3800X16 / 323.9 / 4.7GHz125W$449CES
Ryzen 9 3850X16 / 324.3 / 5.1GHz135W$499May 2019

According to the listings, the Ryzen 3 3300 runs at 3.2GHz with a 4GHz boost clock and 50W TDP (thermal design power), while the Ryzen 3 3300X variant boasts a 3.5GHz base clock and 4.3GHz boost clock with a slightly higher 65W TDP. They are expected to cost no more than $130, which is almost unthinkable for a hexa-core chip.

The Russian website lists the Ryzen 5 3600 at 3.6GHz with a boost clock that reaches 4.4GHz. As for the Ryzen 5 3600X, the chip reportedly has a 4GHz base clock and 4.8GHz boost clock. The non-X variant comes with 65W TDP and the X variant with a 95W TDP.

Going up the Ryzen 3000-series ladder, the Ryzen 7 3700 is listed with a 3.8GHz base clock, 4.6GHz boost clock, and 95W TDP. The higher-end Ryzen 7 3700X flaunts a 4.2GHz base clock, 5GHz boost clock, and 105W TDP.

Lastly, the Ryzen 3800X ticks at 3.9GHz with a 4.7GHz boost clock and is listed with a 125W TDP. On the other hand, the Ryzen 9 3850X is listed with a 4.3GHz base clock and a shockingly-high 5.1GHz boost clock with a 135W TDP rating. However, e-Katalog only listed the first, which could reinforce the rumor that AMD will release the Ryzen 9 3850X at a later date (May 2019).

AMD Ryzen 3000 Series Release Date

AMD could announce the Ryzen 3000-series processors at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) next week. We'll be there to cover the event and bring you the news as it happens.

  • Aspiring techie
    If this is somewhere close to the truth, then holy crap, Intel is screwed!
    Reply
  • WildCard999
    Those boost speeds, if true, are seriously impressive!
    Reply
  • irfbhatt
    That's impressive. AMD is in the lead now!
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    If this is true, this is going to be the biggest performance boost for games we've seen in a long time!
    Reply
  • rgcookjr
    Competition has forced significant advance by AMD in the last couple years. Intel has been able to cruise merrily along with status quo tic/toc updates. Anyone who thinks Intel won't respond to this is delusional.
    Reply
  • Aspiring techie
    21635594 said:
    Competition has forced significant advance by AMD in the last couple years. Intel has been able to cruise merrily along with status quo tic/toc updates. Anyone who thinks Intel won't respond to this is delusional.
    The issue is that Intel's response has been with the 8th and 9th gen processors. 14nm is currently maxed out for them. 10nm will come out at the end of the year, but 1st gen 10nm is likely to perform worse than 14nm. It will likely take one or maybe even two 10nm updates to bring it to par with curent 14nm+++. Even worse, the first architecture to come out on 10nm will be Cannon Lake, which will probably be only a little better than Skylake.

    In short, due to process and architecture constraints, Intel probably won't be able to seriously respond for at least 1 year, possibly 2.

    Now, when Jim Keller finishes his new architecture and Intel starts producing those CPU's, AMD will probably be screwed.
    Reply
  • Blackbird77
    Intel will respond for sure, but AMD gets my respect for pushing the market. Hope they do well more and more.
    Reply
  • Anarkie13
    While I usually am looking at and interested in the more top tier hardware, those 3 series are serious game changers. I sincerely hope this is true. I'll drop $130 on a 6/12 chip with almost no thought at all.
    Reply
  • tim.hotze
    I want to believe that this is true, but I'm skeptical: I don't see how you keep 16 cores fed with 2 channels of DDR4 memory, even if its overclocked (and DDR5 remains an "on-paper" product, and will likely start out in severs), and since you need dedicated pins for memory access (and they're sticking with AM4).

    That puts the entire leak into question, IMO, though it might make sense if they released Ryzen 9 as a niche product (somewhat akin to Intel's 8086k or something).
    Reply
  • pug_s
    Kind of excited about this. I might buy the ryzen 3 or 5 series if it approaches $100 mark and by then the price of ram would be cheap. I hope amd would release 8 core 16 thread version of raven ridge this coming year and I might buy that if the price is affordable.

    21635765 said:
    I want to believe that this is true, but I'm skeptical: I don't see how you keep 16 cores fed with 2 channels of DDR4 memory, even if its overclocked (and DDR5 remains an "on-paper" product, and will likely start out in severs), and since you need dedicated pins for memory access (and they're sticking with AM4).

    That puts the entire leak into question, IMO, though it might make sense if they released Ryzen 9 as a niche product (somewhat akin to Intel's 8086k or something).

    We will see. Right now AMD puts 4 cores per die. With the 7nm process, I think they can cram 8 cores per die.
    Reply