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Asus Erases Bezels On Multi-Monitor Setups, Using Trickery

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LAS VEGAS, NV -- At huge tradeshows like CES, companies often pile up their booths or suites with every product they have available, present and near future, and there’s often little treasures floating around the expansive showrooms. Asus always has multiple rooms in a suite set up, and among the widgets great and small was a piece of flexible, clear polycarbonate-and-rubber that Asus was using to “erase” bezels on multi-monitor setups.

It’s actually called the “bezel-free kit,” and it performs its magic trick using no active electronics of any kind. It’s literally just an optical illusion that uses light refraction to obscure the black bezels on the edges of two side-by-side monitors (or more practically, three side-by-side-by-side monitors using two of these things). The top and bottom have thick black ends that snugly fit onto the top and bottom of a monitor. In between them is the aforementioned strip of clear material that overlaps the edge of each monitor by an inch or so. The clear piece is like a long triangle that nestles back into the monitors at a 130-degree angle.

As you can see, the effect is by no means perfect. In erasing the bezels, this technique leaves the edges of each display a bit fuzzy. The idea is that it smooths out the overall image that’s splashed across three monitors. That’s it. And that’s fine. It doesn’t claim to do any more than that.

Asus said that the Bezel-Free Kit is still just a proof of concept, but it’s “probably” going to come to market at some point. It should work with essentially any thin-bezel monitor.

What we found most intriguing is that we saw this exact same thing at MSI’s Computex booth this past summer, but not at CES. Instead, it was Asus showing off a prototype in Las Vegas.

  • derekullo
    ASUS: We covered up ugly bezels with ugly fuzzy bezels.
    Reply
  • nitrium
    I'd prefer an obvious bezel over a this "solution".
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    I'm actually a bit surprised that truly bezel-less gaming monitors aren't a thing yet. Perhaps it's something that will have to wait for OLED in order to be feasible. Of course, with curved ultra-wide monitors coming to market, especially ones like Samsung's 49" 144hz 32:9 display, I imagine fewer people will want to go with three separate screens.
    Reply
  • TexelTechnologies
    Those wide format displays arent tall enough, its like a thins ass wide visor. Silly.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    20655893 said:
    Those wide format displays arent tall enough, its like a thins ass wide visor. Silly.
    There's a simple solution to that, get a larger screen. Obviously, a 27" 21:9 screen will be shorter than a 27" 16:9, and will have less total screen area due to the narrower aspect ratio, but if you move up to a 34" ultrawide, it will have the same height while being wider. Likewise, a 49" 32:9 screen like that Samsung will have the same height as well, while being wider still. It's like placing two 27" 16:9 screens side by side, only with no bezels blocking your view, and with a smooth curve rather than uneven angles.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    20656092 said:
    with a smooth curve rather than uneven angles.
    Curved monitors will have distortion that's more difficult to compensate for, whereas images on angled monitors can be accurately projected, assuming the monitor aspects and angles are accurately specified. In practice, I don't know how many games actually support this.

    I was hoping some clever software hack would enable anamorphic rendering in the joining edges of the monitors, so the projected bit would seem (nearly) undistorted.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    20656746 said:
    Curved monitors will have distortion that's more difficult to compensate for, whereas images on angled monitors can be accurately projected, assuming the monitor aspects and angles are accurately specified. In practice, I don't know how many games actually support this.
    Yep, I considered that as well, but any distortion compared to a flat screen is going to be quite minor, especially since your focus should be mainly around the center of the display in most 3D games. And of course, unless you have your field of view adjusted perfectly to match your seating distance in every game, and you remain at that distance, your view of the screen's edges will be distorted even on flat displays.

    And again, we're comparing against triple-monitor setups, which as far as I know don't provide any universal way to compensate for the angles of the displays. Aside from a few hardcore racing sims, I don't know of any games that allow you to adjust for screen angles in a multi-monitor setup, so the geometry of the outer screens will appear quite distorted.

    Of course, as far as immersive viewing angles go, VR will probably beat multi-monitor setups before long, once the resolution of headsets increases and they get eye-tracking to allow for optimizations that can make those resolutions viable. It's probably at least a few years off before HMDs will be able to make use of resolutions like that though.
    Reply
  • Ilya__
    Looks like a sketchy solution
    Reply
  • WyomingKnott
    Does anyone have a solution that simply treats the bezels as vision-blockers? Instead of an image being split in two with the bezels being dead space, have part of the image actually occluded by the bezels and keep the overall image (can't think of the right word) un-deformed?
    Reply
  • DXsocko007
    I honestly would love this for my Dual monitor setup when gaming. I could have 32:9 1440p it would be awesome LOL i mean it would be fuzzy but id give it a shot if these things were $20
    Reply