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5TB External HDDs Arriving in Three Months?

By - Source: The Register | B 53 comments

Seagate may introduce a 5TB external hard drive using five 1TB platters in January 2012.

Is Seagate shipping 5 TB hard drives three months from now? That's a hint the company dropped in a recent interview at GITEX 2011, a technology event held in Dubai. Seagate later followed up after the event by saying that an eventual 5 TB drive isn't any real revelation, nor is the timeframe in which the product may arrive.

"Now we have 1 TB per disk," said a Seagate Middle East salesperson by the name of Christian six minutes into the interview. "If you just do a simple calculation ... now a drive can have five disks ... so suddenly you make the disk 5 TB ... within three months you will see it."

Seagate first introduced a GoFlex Desk external hard drive featuring 1 TB platters and an areal density of 625 Gigabits per square inch back in May, revealing a special 3-platter, 3 TB Barracuda XT hard drive crammed inside (which typically uses 5 platters for 3 TB). According to the company, that's enough capacity to store up to 120 high-definition movies, 1,500 video games, thousands of photos or "virtually countless hours of digital music."

Then in September the company added a 4 TB version to its GoFlex Desk line of external drives, but instead of using 1 TB platters, it featured a 5-platter (800 GB each) 7200RPM design. Seagate will reportedly introduce an internal 4 TB hard drive in November which will also use the 5-platter (800 GB each) 7200RPM design.

That said, it's safe to assume that Seagate's 5 TB storage monster will arrive in the form of a GoFlex Desk external drive first, and will likely be revealed during CES 2012 in January. Of course, that's just guesswork based on Seagate's current pattern.

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Top Comments
  • 21 Hide
    Anonymous , October 13, 2011 5:28 PM
    To be more exact (using 150KB/s uncompressed CD sound, and 1TB=1000GB, 1GB=1000MB) that's 1.06 years of music playing 24-7. But because it's Seagate, the drive will fail before you get to that point.
  • 16 Hide
    igot1forya , October 13, 2011 5:58 PM
    Quote "According to the company, that's enough capacity to store up to 120 high-definition movies, 1,500 video games, thousands of photos or "virtually countless hours of digital music.""

    When will the industry realize that these values are meaningless.
  • 15 Hide
    mobrocket , October 13, 2011 5:28 PM
    Porn and movie pirates rejoice
Other Comments
    Display all 53 comments.
  • -7 Hide
    HansVonOhain , October 13, 2011 5:04 PM
    5 Months would be in March.
  • 12 Hide
    oxxfatelostxxo , October 13, 2011 5:16 PM
    Im confused why they would come out with external before internal?
  • 15 Hide
    mobrocket , October 13, 2011 5:28 PM
    Porn and movie pirates rejoice
  • 21 Hide
    Anonymous , October 13, 2011 5:28 PM
    To be more exact (using 150KB/s uncompressed CD sound, and 1TB=1000GB, 1GB=1000MB) that's 1.06 years of music playing 24-7. But because it's Seagate, the drive will fail before you get to that point.
  • -9 Hide
    jcb82 , October 13, 2011 5:29 PM
    These companies CONSUMER businesses are in jeopardy once cloud computing becomes mainstream. I'm sure they'd be looking to form stronger ties with corporations that provide cloud services as of now.
  • 3 Hide
    Trialsking , October 13, 2011 5:31 PM
    HansVonOhain5 Months would be in March.

    Did they edit it, because I see 3 months but 5 TB?!?!?
  • 4 Hide
    dalmvern , October 13, 2011 5:37 PM
    jcb82These companies CONSUMER businesses are in jeopardy once cloud computing becomes mainstream. I'm sure they'd be looking to form stronger ties with corporations that provide cloud services as of now.


    Cloud computing has serious limitations though, first of which is your internet connection. I work with large databases and fiber is not available in my area, so there is no way I would be able to work from home using the cloud.
  • 6 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , October 13, 2011 5:45 PM
    Wow, I don't have enough pr0n to fill that drive! :D 

    HansVonOhain5 Months would be in March.


    Thanks for stating the obvious.

    Seagatehasbeenhjunksincethe80sTo be more exact (using 150KB/s uncompressed CD sound, and 1TB=1000GB, 1GB=1000MB) that's 1.06 years of music playing 24-7. But because it's Seagate, the drive will fail before you get to that point.


    Nonsense; Seagate is a great brand and has been very reliable for me. There're some Seagates that came out when SATA first appeared, and they still run fine on the PCs I repair...

    Anyway, I've got a WD 1.36 TB external drive and it still has 880GB free. What I want now is more affordable SSDs; very few people have enough data to even fill 2TB (unless they download every movie they see and hear about, like some do).
  • 2 Hide
    drwho1 , October 13, 2011 5:51 PM
    This is what I'm waiting for!
    Of course the first year the price will be prohibitive, but soon after that a 5TB internal drive will be around $150-$180 US.

    I will a few of this when they hit that point.
    I currently have most of my movies on hard drives and I have simply ran out of space. I want 8 of this 5TB drives in a NAS!

  • 3 Hide
    jcb82 , October 13, 2011 5:57 PM
    Seagatehasbeenhjunksincethe80sTo be more exact (using 150KB/s uncompressed CD sound, and 1TB=1000GB, 1GB=1000MB) that's 1.06 years of music playing 24-7. But because it's Seagate, the drive will fail before you get to that point.


    Yippee.. lets get technical! Assuming typical CD-quality music, then you're dealing with PCM 16 bit 44.1khz quality sound, which has an uncompressed bit rate of 1411.1kilobits/second. Convert that to kiloBYTES is 176.4KB/s. Also, 1024 KB = 1 MB, and 1024 MB = 1 GB not multiples of 1000!! So convert to real storage numbers 5*1000/1024 = 4.8828125. 4.8828125*1024*1024*1024/176.4 = 29721542 seconds of music or 344 days of music.
  • 16 Hide
    igot1forya , October 13, 2011 5:58 PM
    Quote "According to the company, that's enough capacity to store up to 120 high-definition movies, 1,500 video games, thousands of photos or "virtually countless hours of digital music.""

    When will the industry realize that these values are meaningless.
  • 10 Hide
    Branden , October 13, 2011 6:13 PM
    i hate it when harddrive manufacturers make claims about how many thousands of songs or pictures or hours of video their new goliath harddrives can hold, it's meaningless.
    are these songs 128kbps mp3 or flac? are these pictures 1 or 14 megapixels? are these videos youtube or blu-ray quality?
    but that 1500 video games claim up there takes the cake, are those 15mb or 15gb games?
    morons.
  • -3 Hide
    molo9000 , October 13, 2011 6:18 PM
    5TB drives? Those would be sweet for my NAS...
    No problem with seagate unreliability when using RAID 5 :D 
  • -1 Hide
    rebel1280 , October 13, 2011 6:24 PM
    dalmvernCloud computing has serious limitations though, first of which is your internet connection. I work with large databases and fiber is not available in my area, so there is no way I would be able to work from home using the cloud.

    And you dont think that people hosting your info on the cloud would love to get their hands on this, a server with 12 1TB drives could go from being able to store 12TB to 60TB with same power output.
  • -2 Hide
    rebel1280 , October 13, 2011 6:26 PM
    sorry did not mean to qoute you dlamvern, meant to quote jcb82 and even then, i misread his post anyways so...yeah read on nothing to read here lol
  • 0 Hide
    soccerdocks , October 13, 2011 6:49 PM
    It cannot hold countless hours of music. At least not music thats worth listening to. I exclusively use lossless audio because 128 and 256 kbs mp3s sound like crap. Most lossless audio files are around 30 megs. That means I can store 165,000 songs on that drive. Thats alot, but no where near limitless.
  • -1 Hide
    jdog2076 , October 13, 2011 7:02 PM
    soccerdocksIt cannot hold countless hours of music. At least not music thats worth listening to. I exclusively use lossless audio because 128 and 256 kbs mp3s sound like crap. Most lossless audio files are around 30 megs. That means I can store 165,000 songs on that drive. Thats alot, but no where near limitless.

    256 kbps MP3s sound like crap? I'm sorry, but there are *very* few people that can hear the difference between 256 kbps MP3s and the original uncompressed audio. Even if you are one of those lucky few, actually hearing the difference requires listening through an extremely accurate sound system (i.e. studio monitors).
  • 3 Hide
    thearm , October 13, 2011 7:21 PM
    soccerdocksIt cannot hold countless hours of music. At least not music thats worth listening to. I exclusively use lossless audio because 128 and 256 kbs mp3s sound like crap. Most lossless audio files are around 30 megs. That means I can store 165,000 songs on that drive. Thats alot, but no where near limitless.


    I think you're awesome because of your super high standards.
  • 3 Hide
    Benihana , October 13, 2011 7:43 PM
    This is great news! It means that a 5TB Western Digital drive should be in the works!
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