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Intel Quietly Launches the Celeron 1019Y ULV Processor

By - Source: CPU World | B 17 comments

The Celeron 1019Y is the fifth ULV Ivy Bridge processor with a TDP of under 13 W.

Intel has quietly taken the wraps off its newest ULV microprocessor, the Ivy Bridge-based Celeron 1019Y. Like all mobile Celerons, the 1019Y is a dual-core processor clocked at 1 GHz, a 2 MB L3 cache and features an integrated 350 MHz GPU with a maximum turbo frequency of 800 MHz.

Though the CPU supports Virtualization and other basic technologies, it lacks more advanced features such as Hyper-Threading and Turbo Boost. The chip has a 10 W TDP and can even operate within a 7 W envelop with reduced performance.

The Celeron 1019Y is currently on sale for $153.

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  • -4 Hide
    spentshells , April 10, 2013 12:34 PM
    BIT MINING
  • 2 Hide
    bigpinkdragon286 , April 10, 2013 12:42 PM
    How does this compare to the original C-50 from AMD which has been available for years and came in at 9 W?
  • 8 Hide
    dalethepcman , April 10, 2013 12:55 PM
    Uhh... $153 for a 1ghz dual core celeron seems ridiculous when an ivy bridge pentium 2020 costs $65 and if you downclocked it to 1ghz would probably be in the 15w range and give double the performance.
  • 3 Hide
    spentshells , April 10, 2013 12:56 PM
    Quote:
    How does this compare to the original C-50 from AMD which has been available for years and came in at 9 W?


    Well it has an intergrated gpu so IM not sure they compare so well.

    Picture ivy bridge dual core vs athlon2 x2

    Not a pretty picture.
  • 2 Hide
    artk2219 , April 10, 2013 1:45 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    How does this compare to the original C-50 from AMD which has been available for years and came in at 9 W?


    Well it has an intergrated gpu so IM not sure they compare so well.

    Picture ivy bridge dual core vs athlon2 x2

    Not a pretty picture.



    Not even an athlon II dual core, its really like an ivy bridge dual core vs an original Turion x2, the C50 gets absolutely destroyed.

  • 1 Hide
    spentshells , April 10, 2013 1:49 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Quote:
    How does this compare to the original C-50 from AMD which has been available for years and came in at 9 W?


    Well it has an intergrated gpu so IM not sure they compare so well.

    Picture ivy bridge dual core vs athlon2 x2


    Not a pretty picture.



    Not even an athlon II dual core, its really like an ivy bridge dual core vs an original Turion x2, the C50 gets absolutely destroyed.



    I was being generous, i've seen POS systems using that cpu, once out of the os the thing had issues playing back higher res video not even at 1080P.
  • -1 Hide
    griptwister , April 10, 2013 2:02 PM
    But can it run Crysis?
  • 0 Hide
    blibba , April 10, 2013 2:02 PM
    Quote:
    Uhh... $153 for a 1ghz dual core celeron seems ridiculous when an ivy bridge pentium 2020 costs $65 and if you downclocked it to 1ghz would probably be in the 15w range and give double the performance.


    1) You can't under or over clock either chip
    2) Performance would be identical
    3) They're not for the same socket
  • 0 Hide
    artk2219 , April 10, 2013 2:12 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Quote:
    How does this compare to the original C-50 from AMD which has been available for years and came in at 9 W?


    Well it has an intergrated gpu so IM not sure they compare so well.

    Picture ivy bridge dual core vs athlon2 x2


    Not a pretty picture.



    Not even an athlon II dual core, its really like an ivy bridge dual core vs an original Turion x2, the C50 gets absolutely destroyed.



    I was being generous, i've seen POS systems using that cpu, once out of the os the thing had issues playing back higher res video not even at 1080P.



    I haven't seen problems that severe unless they loaded the poor thing down with so much bloatware that it was super impeding performance. But you're right, they aren't going to win any speed races. What really gets me about the celeron is that price, 153 bucks for pretty much an underclocked and undervolted standard Celeron. I'd be very curious to see how many of these chips they actually sell, those margins have to be awesome on their end.
  • 2 Hide
    dalethepcman , April 10, 2013 3:18 PM
    Quote:

    1) You can't under or over clock either chip
    2) Performance would be identical
    3) They're not for the same socket


    1.) /facepalm. Are you really that naive? (look up "Speed Step")
    2.) 2020 has 1MB more cache and 30% faster gpu clocks, See #1
    3.) Who knew a BGA cpu wouldn't fit into an LGA socket, See #1
  • 0 Hide
    Blandge , April 10, 2013 4:13 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:

    1) You can't under or over clock either chip
    2) Performance would be identical
    3) They're not for the same socket


    1.) /facepalm. Are you really that naive? (look up "Speed Step")
    2.) 2020 has 1MB more cache and 30% faster gpu clocks, See #1
    3.) Who knew a BGA cpu wouldn't fit into an LGA socket, See #1


    You seriously think 1MB of L3 cache and 30% GPU frequency is going to double performance?
  • -1 Hide
    sonofliberty08 , April 10, 2013 8:41 PM
    Quote:
    How does this compare to the original C-50 from AMD which has been available for years and came in at 9 W?


    the C-50 have better graphic performance
  • 1 Hide
    cookoy , April 10, 2013 9:39 PM
    pretty expensive for a brand people would rather stay away from
  • 0 Hide
    ojas , April 11, 2013 4:58 AM
    Quote:
    Uhh... $153 for a 1ghz dual core celeron seems ridiculous when an ivy bridge pentium 2020 costs $65 and if you downclocked it to 1ghz would probably be in the 15w range and give double the performance.

    Not the same market segment, i presume. And it's BGA, so it's for OEMs. Plus this chip will have a normal power consumption of around 7w (the SDP).

    Or were you just trollin'?
  • 0 Hide
    dalethepcman , April 11, 2013 12:53 PM
    Ojas - I was just making a statement that this chip has a cost of $153, which is insane compared to the same architecture chip, using the same silicon costing $65. As for market segment, this type of release is not going to help Intel enter ARM's low power low cost market, so I would say this is for an imaginary market.

    Blange - no I don't, that was an exaggeration, but the performance would be far from Identical
  • 0 Hide
    ojas , April 30, 2013 7:26 AM
    Quote:
    Ojas - I was just making a statement that this chip has a cost of $153, which is insane compared to the same architecture chip, using the same silicon costing $65. As for market segment, this type of release is not going to help Intel enter ARM's low power low cost market, so I would say this is for an imaginary market.

    Blange - no I don't, that was an exaggeration, but the performance would be far from Identical


    Not the *same* silicon. This stuff is binned to run at lower voltages. Same reason why chips that can achieve very high clocks are expensive.
  • 0 Hide
    dalethepcman , April 30, 2013 1:41 PM
    Quote:
    Not the *same* silicon. This stuff is binned to run at lower voltages. Same reason why chips that can achieve very high clocks are expensive.


    Did you know that binning is the process of testing products from the same batch, separating them based on their success/failure rate, disabling failed parts and labeling the products accordingly?

    So yes, this is the same silicon, made in the same factory, using the same process and die, and on the same production line as any other 22nm CPU.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Product_binning