Samsung: Consumers Know Which Device They're Using

After five days of duking it out in court, Samsung brought out the big guns and booted up three devices for the jury.

Hoping to show them just how easy it is to differentiate between their products and Apple's, Samsung brought up exactly how many steps it takes before consumers can even see so many of the design aspects Apple claims Samsung copied.

One of the major points brought up by Apple in opening statements was that Samsung's devices are so similar to theirs that consumers could end up mistaking a Samsung device for an Apple one.

To defend themselves, Samsung first booted up the Droid Charge, showing that consumers had to turn the device on, unlock it, and then hit a software button in order to pull up a list of applications. This meant users would first see a large Samsung splash title screen, an animated video with the iconic robotic "DROID" sound and then have to go through two more steps before seeing all of the phone's application icons.

This was significant because Apple spent a majority of the day having expert witness Susan Kare testify regarding how the similarities between iconography and home-screen layout infringed on Apple's design patents. After booting up the Droid, the company booted up an iPhone showing how Apple's product starts up with a distinct Apple logo before going into the home screen.

Samsung's counsel Charles Verhoeven continued this defense with Apple's next expert, Russell Winer, who pointed out similarities between the Galaxy Tab 10.1 and the iPad. With Apple using the Samsung-led Best Buy study for their argument, Samsung snapped back by turning on the Galaxy Tab to show how easy it is to differentiate between the two.

Like the Droid Charge earlier, the Galaxy Tab booted up with a Samsung splash screen, this time also clearly showing the name of the device. For more information about what went on in the courtroom, check out the source article from Cnet.

 

Contact Us for News Tips, Corrections and Feedback

Create a new thread in the US News comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
34 comments
    Your comment
    Top Comments
  • icemunk
    Apple: "We think our customers are too stupid to tell the difference"
    31
  • Vorador2
    Also, the big Samsung logo on the front of most Samsung devices. Apple and their experts seems to be consistently missing it.
    29
  • nbelote
    Can't distinguish?

    So consumers are illiterate (can't read the words "Galaxy Tab" or "iPad" printed directly on the tablet) and stupid (don't look at the box of the product they are buying)? Yup, describes me to a "T."
    24
  • Other Comments
  • Vorador2
    Also, the big Samsung logo on the front of most Samsung devices. Apple and their experts seems to be consistently missing it.
    29
  • nbelote
    Can't distinguish?

    So consumers are illiterate (can't read the words "Galaxy Tab" or "iPad" printed directly on the tablet) and stupid (don't look at the box of the product they are buying)? Yup, describes me to a "T."
    24
  • raytseng
    I think this whole line of questioning is more along the lines of how many kids on christmas day are disappointing their parents got them a Playstation instead of an xbox (or viceversa). Or got an xbox instead of an xbox360. or a ps2 instead of a ps3.

    Should PS3s now have stickers on them saying "NOT AN XBOX, not a PS2" and XBOXs have stickers saying "NOT A PS3"

    The person who really wanted the thing, usually knows or figures it out.
    They just are uninformed buyers, but weren't misled.

    Unless they are truly misrepresenting the product like a Sorny or Panasorniac, or a Roolex.

    If I were on the jury I'd say that is a BS argument and actually hold it against Apple's lawyers for trying to pull BS.
    19