EVGA GQ Series 750W PSU Review

EVGA teamed up with FSP once again to produce the new GQ line, which is one step below the highly popular G2 series. The four GQ PSUs feature 80 Plus Gold efficiency and semi-modular cabling, promising quiet operation.

EVGA cooperates closely with Super Flower, and it shows if you take a quick look at the company's high-end PSUs. However, EVGA is also working with other manufacturers, including FSP. Relying on just one manufacturer can be risky, especially if the company is as busy as Super Flower. On top of that, EVGA wanted  to build a budget-oriented, mid-range platform that would allow it to pounce on the corresponding chunk of the market.

None of EVGA's mainstream PSUs are made by Super Flower, and in the mid-range segment, only its B2 line-up comes from the prolific OEM. For its entry-level models, EVGA uses HEC platforms exclusively, while the B1, G1 and now the GQ lines come from FSP.

The GQ series consists of four models with capacities ranging from 650W to 1kW. All of the PSUs are 80 Plus Gold-certified, use only Japanese capacitors and employ semi-modular cabling where only the ATX connector, which you need no matter what, is fixed. These units also feature a high-quality Fluid Dynamic Bearing (FDB) fan and, thanks to a semi-passive mode, promise silent operation under light and medium loads.

In order to lower production costs, the GQ platform uses an Active Clamp Reset Forward (ACRF) topology that offers good efficiency without requiring the extra (and expensive) components needed in a full- or half-bridge design, such as LLC resonant converters. Although we've seen well-built ACRF topologies demonstrate impressive overall results, their load regulation and ripple suppression performance isn't as high as top-notch full/half bridge topologies. That's why ACRF is mostly used in budget-oriented PSUs and not in high-end units. Regardless, FSP has lots of experience building ACRF-based PSUs, and we are curious to see how the 750W GQ model fares against its competition in this category.

Specifications

Besides 80 Plus Gold efficiency, EVGA's 750 GQ features semi-modular cabling and has a 50 °C temperature rating for full power delivery. On top of that, it is Haswell-ready thanks to the DC-DC converters it uses to generate the minor rails. All of the important protection features are included, according to EVGA's specs. Cooling is handled by a FDB fan that isn't particularly quiet at high rotational speeds; EVGA probably should have used a slower-spinning model. Thankfully, a semi-passive mode saves the day under light and moderate loads. The PSU's dimensions are compact, measuring a little over 16cm deep. And the provided warranty is shorter than EVGA's G2 line-up at just five years.

Power Specifications

Rail3.3V5V12V5VSB-12V
Max. PowerAmps242462.430.5
Watts120748.8156
Total Max. Power (W)750

A single +12V rail can deliver the unit's full power on its own. The minor rails are quite strong as well with 120W max combined power.

The 5VSB rail is adequate for a 750W PSU, while the -12V rail is of no real importance. We wonder why PSU manufacturers still spend money implementing its circuit.

Cables And Connectors

Modular Cables
DescriptionCable CountConnector Count (Total)
ATX connector 20+4 pin (610mm)11
4+4 pin EPS12V (650mm)22
6+2 pin PCIe (650mm)22
6+2 pin PCIe (650mm+100mm)24
SATA (550mm+100mm+100mm)39
Four-pin Molex (550mm+100mm+100mm)13
FDD Adapter (+100mm)12

The 750 GQ has lots of cables and connectors, including a pair of EPS and six PCIe connectors. Although this is a mid-range PSU, its cable configuration easily meets the standards of high-end models in the same wattage range. You also get nine SATA connectors, which covers any combination of SSDs and hard drives we've seen. Only the number of four-pin Molex connectors looks low; we think there should be at least five of them. Lastly, the connectors mostly use 18-gauge wiring, which is what the ATX spec recommends.

Cable length is satisfactory overall. Our only complaint is the short distance between four-pin connectors. Usually, the devices powered by them are relatively far apart, so 10cm between each one will probably cause problems. Strangely, EVGA equips the 750 GQ with two FDD connectors instead of just one, and both are on the same lead. The company could have stuck with a single FDD connector and been fine. 

Power Distribution

Since this PSU features a single +12V rail, we do not have anything to say about its power distribution.

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  • 10tacle
    Huh. Johnny Guru gave two variants of this PSU series recommended ratings back in Nov. & Dec (650, 850). I saw a 650W on sale at NewEgg last December for $50(US) after rebate and almost recommended it to a friend, but I didn't as I hadn't seen a JohnnyGuru review on the GQ series yet (they gave it a 9.4). They also gave the 850W version a 9.2 rating back in November.

    Not sure what happened with this 750W example, but it sounds more like what one would expect with a Corsair CX750 example. Definitely not the same results that Johnny Guru got with two different GQ variants.
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  • Aris_Mp
    The lower capacity GQ models use a different platform from the higher capacity ones (850W and more).

    The design of the 650 and 750 GQ models doesn't allow for better performance, especially in ripple performance.
    1
  • dstarr3
    Eh, I'd stick with the G2 series. That's a lot more quality for only a small price premium. And really, the PSU is probably the worst place to cut costs in a system build.
    2
  • basroil
    Oh god, another PoS EVGA unit that shares a similar name to the spectacular G2... I can see a flood of "my graphics card has coil whine", "my computer constantly crashes", and "my headphones have static/popping (only when playing games)" posts in the forum soon...
    1
  • joz
    Quote:
    Eh, I'd stick with the G2 series. That's a lot more quality for only a small price premium. And really, the PSU is probably the worst place to cut costs in a system build.

    Agreed. G2 550 and 650's are great. And the P2 750+ if you need that sort of power are great too. But these...."craptacularripplefail," units EVGA is tossing out is really hurting their image. I understand market catering and such, but they need to rethink their strategy. They aren't going to win any price/perf races while Corsair can continue to throw their shitty cx units out the window to customers. And EVGA I hold to higher standards then Corsair, so its kind of a shame to see the performance of these lower quality power supplies.
    1
  • SR-71 Blackbird
    I would take the EVGA G2 , P2 , T2 over any other POWER SUPPLIES including Seasonic.
    0
  • jonnyguru
    Quote:

    Agreed. G2 550 and 650's are great. And the P2 750+ if you need that sort of power are great too. But these...."craptacularripplefail," units EVGA is tossing out is really hurting their image. I understand market catering and such, but they need to rethink their strategy. They aren't going to win any price/perf races while Corsair can continue to throw their shitty cx units out the window to customers. And EVGA I hold to higher standards then Corsair, so its kind of a shame to see the performance of these lower quality power supplies.


    Unfortunately, you can't be too profitable selling only niche higher end product. At some point, if you want the board of directors to let you continue putting out power supplies, you have to put something out that can do volume. The B2 Series, The GQ Series, etc. Don't like them? Don't buy them. Is it hurting their reputation? No. Not as long as higher end units like the G2, P2, etc. continue to be solid. But if they start to slip for whatever reason, then you can say their reputation is in jeoprady. Seriously. Hardly anybody judges the Corvette because of the Chevy Spark (well... maybe some Ford fanboys, but still).
    2
  • SR-71 Blackbird
    I like the GQ's and recommend them , also love the Corsair RMx series and recommend those too.
    -1
  • PureBlackFire
    Quote:
    Huh. Johnny Guru gave two variants of this PSU series recommended ratings back in Nov. & Dec (650, 850). I saw a 650W on sale at NewEgg last December for $50(US) after rebate and almost recommended it to a friend, but I didn't as I hadn't seen a JohnnyGuru review on the GQ series yet (they gave it a 9.4). They also gave the 850W version a 9.2 rating back in November.

    Not sure what happened with this 750W example, but it sounds more like what one would expect with a Corsair CX750 example. Definitely not the same results that Johnny Guru got with two different GQ variants.


    well, this is hardly the first time an FSP platform performed reasonably well at 650 watts and sucked at 750. sure it won't be the last either. as for the 850, like Aris said, based on a different (better) design.
    1
  • 10tacle
    Anonymous said:
    well, this is hardly the first time an FSP platform performed reasonably well at 650 watts and sucked at 750. sure it won't be the last either. as for the 850, like Aris said, based on a different (better) design.


    That's just not right. A certain series should be of the same quality across the series offerings. There's a reason people shop for different series for their needs (budget vs. quality, etc.). Hell it's complicated enough already just trying to keep up with each OEM series line offerings and their quality tiers. I mean we all know the general quality difference between Corsair's CX line and EVGA's G2 line.
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  • PureBlackFire
    Anonymous said:


    That's just not right. A certain series should be of the same quality across the series offerings. There's a reason people shop for different series for their needs (budget vs. quality, etc.). Hell it's complicated enough already just trying to keep up with each OEM series line offerings and their quality tiers. I mean we all know the general quality difference between Corsair's CX line and EVGA's G2 line.



    unfortunately engineering is more involved than that. even within those two series you named, there are nuanced differences in the series, even on the same platform. the Be Quiet Dark Pro 11 1200 doesn't perform so great among other high end 1200 watt units, but the 850 watt sits right among the top units at that capacity.
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  • 10tacle
    Anonymous said:
    unfortunately engineering is more involved than that. even within those two series you named, there are nuanced differences in the series, even on the same platform. the Be Quiet Dark Pro 11 1200 doesn't perform so great among other high end 1200 watt units, but the 850 watt sits right among the top units at that capacity.


    Yep, I can understand that between the component need differences of a 650W and 1050W in the same series line like Japanese vs. Chinese made capacitors for example. Just goes to show not only do we need to know the general product line, but we really need to drill down to the specific PSU in that product line for true quality measurement. A series lineage alone doesn't guarantee anything.

    I don't upgrade PSUs nearly as often as I do CPUs and GPUs combined, so reviews like this are nice to know in between years of not being in the PSU market.
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  • jonnyguru
    Quote:


    Yep, I can understand that between the component need differences of a 650W and 1050W in the same series line like Japanese vs. Chinese made capacitors for example.


    Well... Then you don't really understand because Japanese brand vs. Chinese brand capacitors aren't making the differences you're eluding too. It costs a lot of money to have multiple platforms within the same product line. It typically costs less in engineering costs and BOM cost to reuse the same platform for multiple wattages. Unfortunately, that almost always means that that platform works at its best at one wattage, but not necessarily one higher or one lower.
    0
  • turkey3_scratch
    Out of spec ripple is enough for me to say "no" to a unit. This just proves what I always say: you can't judge a particular power supply based on other models in the series. We did not see this stuff with the 650W and 850W models, too bad the 750W is an under-performer.
    2