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Intel Has a 48-Core Chip for Smartphones and Tablets

Intel apparently has the chip running in its labs in Barcelona, Spain and is reportedly capable of running different apps on different cores. Today, Intel's smartphone processor works with a single core and even the ARM rivals run with a measly four cores. 48 cores, of course, could open completely opportunities what a smartphone could accomplish.

A scientist from Intel's labs told Computerworld that such a processor could, "for instance, be encrypting an email while also working on other power-intensive apps at the same time." Or, in a dynamic environment, some cores could be running at higher clock speeds to provide high performance, while other cores could be performing basic tasks a much lower clock speeds and open the door to much more granular power saving techniques. The number of cores may not be so much of a problem than the fabric that is connecting the cores as well as the software that is managing such a chip.

Intel's CTO Justin Rattner was more optimistic about the introduction date of such a processor than the researcher himself, who predicted a 10-year time frame. Rattner told Computerworld that it could be "much sooner". According to the executive, techniques such as "speech recognition and augmented reality will push the need for more computational power."

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  • rohitbaran
    Too much power consumption I guess. If not, then good job Intel.
    Reply
  • fuzzion
    Did Tom just take a random pic of a mobo inside a PC casing ?? Or am I expected to carry that 48 core 10pound gorilla in my pocket?
    Reply
  • gilgamex
    This might be a planned idea for a smaller node in the future, and building the prototype based on that, potentially 14nm.
    Reply
  • ushyperion
    48 cores for a phone, can't wait to see what they have for the pc in the future.
    Reply
  • mavroxur
    fuzzionDid Tom just take a random pic of a mobo inside a PC casing ?? Or am I expected to carry that 48 core 10pound gorilla in my pocket?

    More than likely they're emulating the new design in a FPGA of some sort for debugging / testing, hence the giant heatsink / fan and boatloads of support hardware.
    Reply
  • officeguy
    Cell phones has come a long way. From just taking and receiving calls and now a 48 core in a cell phone being tested. Not only that i can talk to friends on my cell, I can also have a meaningful conversation on the phone itself. It will be my new best friend.
    Reply
  • dechy
    I guess all that proding & poking ARM has been doing towards Intel might have just woken up a sleeping giant.
    Reply
  • abraham_mammogram
    As I understood it, high core count processors are inherently ineffective, due to the issue of data transfer between all of the cores taking a considerable amount of time. Would this problem be reduced if separate core "clusters" were working on different computational tasks, acting as independent units within the processor, as mentioned in the article? If so, would it not be easier to just include multi-processor smart phones, rather than one single 48 core phone?
    Reply
  • CaedenV
    fuzzionDid Tom just take a random pic of a mobo inside a PC casing ?? Or am I expected to carry that 48 core 10pound gorilla in my pocket?... that could make for some akward moments in the office.
    Reply
  • memadmax
    Guys, the picture is obviously showing a testing rig.
    The processor itself is either underneath the small fan on the bottom(which may or may not be a south/northbridge chip) or it is sitting on a module that is on the bottom right hand corner of the picture.
    More than likely its on that module.
    Reply