Adobe Strikes Back With 'We Heart Apple' Ad

The war between Adobe and Apple was starting to calm down. Though it's unlikely either side was ready to make up, it had been a few days since we'd heard anything from either side. However, that was probably more because Adobe was busy loading the canons with a new ad campaign and not because it was tired of the extremely public feud.

Yesterday, Adobe launched a new, passive aggressive ad campaign that takes a shot at Apple while remaining nice as pie. "Who us? We're just concerned about the users here, ma'am."

Along with these, Adobe's co-founders, Chuck Geschke and John Warnock, published an open letter detailing the company's thoughts on open markets. It's all pretty predictable stuff about not blocking innovation by fragmenting the Web into closed systems.

"Freedom of choice on the web has unleashed an explosion of content and transformed how we work, learn, communicate, and, ultimately, express ourselves," the letter reads. "We believe that consumers should be able to freely access their favorite content and applications, regardless of what computer they have, what browser they like, or what device suits their needs. No company — no matter how big or how creative — should dictate what you can create, how you create it, or what you can experience on the web."

Towards the end of the letter, Geschke and Warnock mention Apple specifically:

"We believe that Apple, by taking the opposite approach, has taken a step that could undermine this next chapter of the web — the chapter in which mobile devices outnumber computers, any individualcan be a publisher, and content is accessed anywhere and at any time."

Full letter is pasted below for those interested in reading the full, unabridged version.

The genius of the Internet is its almost infinite openness to innovation. New hardware. New software. New applications. New ideas. They all get their chance.

As the founders of Adobe, we believe open markets are in the best interest of developers, content owners, and consumers. Freedom of choice on the web has unleashed an explosion of content and transformed how we work, learn, communicate, and, ultimately, express ourselves.

If the web fragments into closed systems, if companies put content and applications behind walls, some indeed may thrive — but their success will come at the expense of the very creativity and innovation that has made the Internet a revolutionary force.

We believe that consumers should be able to freely access their favorite content and applications, regardless of what computer they have, what browser they like, or what device suits their needs. No company — no matter how big or how creative — should dictate what you can create, how you create it, or what you can experience on the web.

When markets are open, anyone with a great idea has a chance to drive innovation and find new customers. Adobe's business philosophy is based on a premise that, in an open market, the best products will win in the end — and the best way to compete is to create the best technology and innovate faster than your competitors.

That, certainly, was what we learned as we launched PostScript® and PDF, two early and powerful software solutions that work across platforms. We openly published the specifications for both, thus inviting both use and competition. In the early days, PostScript attracted 72 clone makers, but we held onto our market leadership by out-innovating the pack. More recently, we've done the same thing with Adobe® Flash® technology. We publish the specifications for Flash — meaning anyone can make their own Flash player. Yet, Adobe Flash technology remains the market leader because of the constant creativity and technical innovation of our employees.

We believe that Apple, by taking the opposite approach, has taken a step that could undermine this next chapter of the web — the chapter in which mobile devices outnumber computers, any individual can be a publisher, and content is accessed anywhere and at any time.

In the end, we believe the question is really this: Who controls the World Wide Web? And we believe the answer is: nobody — and everybody, but certainly not a single company.

Chuck Geschke, John Warnock
Cofounders
Chairmen, Adobe Board of Directors

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  • rf88he102
    Adobe is just acting childish. I hate not having flash on my iPhone, but I think thats not the way they are going to get to apple. Apple also has a point by saying that they want the user to have the best experience out of their products. If an iPhone app or safari running flash crash, Adobe is not going to be the one blamed, Apple is. I think more than half of the people out there don't know what objective C language is, and how their apps are written.
    They need to improve themselves and not just go where the money is at. If the android market was bigger than the app store, I bet they wouldn't be so concerned about their products running on the iPhone.
  • fitzergerald
    Agree with the second part of the ad but "we *heart* apple is (G) - (A) - (Y)
  • Miharu
    Feel like Adobe doesn't want to be see as the bad guy in that problem.
    But this disappoint me a bit... Someone should really oppose to Apple business "way". Adobe could change his rule like Apple do with lastest OS. He could completely stop support on Mac OS and trade of PC cd-key and do a trade-up program for trade Mac to PC (or give them Windows 7 key). If you have 40% business in Apple OS, this should be easy change it for 100% PC business. At the end, Apple doesn't have create anything... they think they're gods but Mac hardware is a PC, iPod/iPad is someone else technology (HTC perhaps). If you use their SDK, you give them your source code. :pt1cable:

    No freedom on Apple SDK so they should stop right there.