Google Now Rolling Out Android 4.2.1

Ed Caggiani of Talk Android reports that his Nexus 10 tablet was just upgraded OTA to Android 4.2.1, indicating that Google is now rolling out the latest patch to all Nexus devices. The update is reportedly rather small, a mere 1.1 MB in size, and patches the People app bug that nuked the month of December, preventing Jelly Bean 4.2 users from adding birthdays for contacts born during that festive month.

So far there's no indication as to what the upgrade brings to Android other than the People app fix, but additional reports indicate that the patch may address Bluetooth performance issues that arrived with Android 4.2. Additional stability and battery life improvements are also a possibility with this new patch.

While many Android partners may disagree, Google made a smart move by launching its Nexus program. The company can quickly launch updates on the fly without wireless carriers getting in the way. The People app bug is a perfect example: the fix was released in just weeks whereas a simple patch distributed through wireless networks would require evaluation, testing and possible additional bloatware – if it's even distributed at all.

Despite bringing several problems to the Android platform, the 4.2 update definitely improved performance and stability. It also added Gesture Typing, allowing users to glide their finger across the keyboard to type just like Swype and SwiftKey. The update also brought multiple user accounts, new Google Now cards, a Photo Sphere mode in the Camera app, and more.

"Android 4.2 allows devices to enable wireless display," Google states. "You can share movies, YouTube videos, and anything that’s on your screen on an HDTV. Just connect a wireless display adapter to any HDMI-enabled TV to mirror what’s on your screen quickly and easily."

This latest update, v4.2.1, is reportedly now being rolled out to the Nexus 4 smartphone, and the Nexus 7 and 10 tablets. Stay tuned for an actual change log from Google.

 

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  • ikaz
    its really not so much Google but the phone providers since its "open source" they can add whatever they want to it (mostly bloatware) to do things like prevent tethring, hotspot etc so they can charge your more.
  • Other Comments
  • wemakeourfuture
    What percentage of Android devices can get this version on day 1? Day 30? Day 90?

    At least with iOS you know if your product is supported on day 1 you can update.

    Google needs to sort out its fragmentation to provide updates to devices in a timely manner. Plus with longer term support. The small percentage of people who value updates will be more easily swayed for Android devices. Plus it will keep the existing Android customers more content by getting new features and fixes quicker.
  • reprotected
    wemakeourfutureWhat percentage of Android devices can get this version on day 1? Day 30? Day 90?At least with iOS you know if your product is supported on day 1 you can update.Google needs to sort out its fragmentation to provide updates to devices in a timely manner. Plus with longer term support. The small percentage of people who value updates will be more easily swayed for Android devices. Plus it will keep the existing Android customers more content by getting new features and fixes quicker.

    It's also annoying for Canadians who has a variant of the GSII who can't update their phone via going to settings and updating, rather I have to Odin or Kies update. I have to wait longer for the update, and syncing is extremely difficult. There still is no iTunes for Android for easier data saving, and although some may dislike the idea and would just ask me to root and use Titanium, rooting would require me to reinstall my OS, and making no difference between rooting and updating.
  • Anonymous
    Android fragmentation is no longer an issue in my mind.

    With Apple, you can _assume_ that your phone is not going to be supported properly after two generations.

    With Google, you can _assume_ that you phone is not going to be supported properly after two generations.

    The end.