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Cyberpunk 2077 Developer: Don't Ask PlayStation for Refunds

Cyberpunk Header Image
(Image credit: CD Projekt Red)

 It looks like getting a refund for the PlayStation 4 version of Cyberpunk 2077 has just gotten harder. Originally, CD Projekt Red had referred frustrating owners of the title to reach out to either Sony PlayStation or Microsoft Xbox for a refund if they didn’t want to wait for the company to fix the outstanding issues. Now it would seem that isn’t the case.

In a new update from CD Projekt Red, they are now telling the game owners that they should reach out to Xbox. but that is no longer the case for PlayStation 4 owners. The original messaging made it seem like the company was getting special treatment, which turned out not to be the case.

Since then, both PlayStation and Xbox have likely received a high number of requests for refunds, which has likely frustrated both companies. However, Microsoft has a “better” refund policy and has been known to be lenient when it comes to refunds. PlayStation has been known to stick to their guns, and don’t easily refund anything. 

According to PlayStation's refund policy, it will only offer a refund if a game hasn't already been downloaded, and if it has been, then it has to be proven to be faulty. In this instance, the rampant bugs and performance issues don't equate to being faulty, at least not in PlayStation's eyes.

PlayStation refund policy

(Image credit: PlayStation)

Numerous refund hopefuls that have been turned away by PlayStation have turned to CDPR, which prompted the company to release the following message, which was first reported by Kotaku:

CD Projekt Red don't contact Sony

(Image credit: CD Projekt Red)

Xbox One owners are free to keep contacting Xbox, while PlayStation 4 owners appear to be stuck between a rock and a hard place. Sure, you can still reach out to PlayStation, but you may not like what you hear when you do. It doesn't seem like the door is completely shut, as CDPR did at least say that they'll provide another update regarding the matter before 2020 ends.

If you're someone who owns a PlayStation 4 version of Cyberpunk 2077 and is looking for a refund, your best bet, for now, is to reach out to CDPR at the email address helpmerefund@cdprojektred.com. But do it quick as this email address was supposedly only going to be available until December 21st, 2020, which is next Monday.

  • Bill Wendel
    Who gets away with releasing a game that is broken at launch? I've heard of games that needed some bug fixes here and there and maybe patches for performance but to fix a game for a console that is broken at launch is complete Bravo Sierra. One of the benefits of console programming is that the hardware is set. Programmers don't have to worry about a multitude of hardware configurations.

    If I paid a bunch of money for a game that was pretty much unplayable I'd want my money back as well. Or file complaint with BBB and and whatever consumer protection service my state has to offer. Then I'd never buy a game from that company again.
    Reply
  • PapaCrazy
    Bill Wendel said:
    Who gets away with releasing a game that is broken at launch? I've heard of games that needed some bug fixes here and there and maybe patches for performance but to fix a game for a console that is broken at launch is complete Bravo Sierra. One of the benefits of console programming is that the hardware is set. Programmers don't have to worry about a multitude of hardware configurations.

    If I paid a bunch of money for a game that was pretty much unplayable I'd want my money back as well. Or file complaint with BBB and and whatever consumer protection service my state has to offer. Then I'd never buy a game from that company again.

    It's a sign of where the gaming industry went. First time I encountered this was playing Skyrim on PS3. You can Google it. Memory would get filled up and the game began to stutter. People were livid. I got lucky because Frys allowed me to exchange the physical copy from PS3 version to PC. Now that everything is digital distribution that would never work.

    It's a sad state that gaming is in. Fired up RDR2 on PC last week and found out that something called "naturalist update" ruined what was already an extremely buggy game. Like many others, I can't even run it anymore without a CTD.

    These kind of <Mod Edit>-show releases are happening more and more. Really makes me question spending money on games/hardware.
    Reply
  • woot
    Dont the developers usually test their games on all the applicable platforms to find bugs? how does this go through unnoticed?

    Maybe they just decided to rush the release so they dont get any more death threats for delaying the game...
    Reply
  • Ameen Jarrar
    Ahhh, welp, it was nice to have a decent game company in the industry while it lasted. I had a feeling that someday CD Projekt/CD Projekt RED would do something to anger people. And I'm sad that my worried thought was right.
    Reply
  • MorganPike
    Ameen Jarrar said:
    Ahhh, welp, it was nice to have a decent game company in the industry while it lasted. I had a feeling that someday CD Projekt/CD Projekt RED would do something to anger people. And I'm sad that my worried thought was right.

    Money trumps artistic vision. Once a company reaches a certain size the 'suits' take over and the creators take a back seat. I agree with you, this sucks but it certainly is no surprise.
    Reply
  • MorganPike
    woot said:
    Dont the developers usually test their games on all the applicable platforms to find bugs? how does this go through unnoticed?

    Maybe they just decided to rush the release so they dont get any more death threats for delaying the game...

    CDPR certainly deserves a lot of blame here. But also, aren't MS and Sony supposed to test products before they're released on their respective platforms in an effort to protect their customers? I know MS has a fairly involved approval process and I'm confident Sony does as well, but not as confident as I was a couple weeks ago, LOL . So all I'm saying is, there's plenty of blame to go around.
    Reply
  • MorganPike
    PapaCrazy said:
    It's a sad state that gaming is in. Fired up RDR2 on PC last week and found out that something called "naturalist update" ruined what was already an extremely buggy game. Like many others, I can't even run it anymore without a CTD.

    Well that's disturbing news. I've been wanting to get back to that game.
    Reply
  • Jim90
    MorganPike said:
    CDPR certainly deserves a lot of blame here. But also, aren't MS and Sony supposed to test products before they're released on their respective platforms in an effort to protect their customers? I know MS has a fairly involved approval process and I'm confident Sony does as well, but not as confident as I was a couple weeks ago, LOL . So all I'm saying is, there's plenty of blame to go around.

    I totally agree that console manufacturers should take more responsibility in protecting their customers from poor quality software. I wonder, though, just how much their legal team has been able to offload back to the developer (or to the consumer!). Wouldn't it be great for a class action to test just how much Sony can be legally held accountable! Seems reasonable that they should be. Seems like a great opportunity with Cyberpunk 2077.
    It wasn't that many years ago, where physical media was the only distribution method, and where QA was required - by obvious default - to be taken much, much more seriously. Yes, there were still bugs (naturally), but QA and testing was way above current extremely poor levels. The internet brought pros and cons. This aspect sits firmly in the con section.
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    This is why we need government intervention to force game companies to do refunds. Private industry continues to fail at addressing faulty or just plain bad games. Too many game companies get away with dumping unfinished crap onto the market without a financial penalty that refunds could provide.

    Personally, I have zero trust of any gaming company anymore. I've been stuck with games that were broken messes, had horrific monetization schemes patched in after launch, or that had their feature roadmaps completely thrown out. That's in addition to a few just plain bad games. Broad refund solutions are needed.
    Reply
  • MorganPike
    bigdragon said:
    This is why we need government intervention to force game companies to do refunds. Private industry continues to fail at addressing faulty or just plain bad games. Too many game companies get away with dumping unfinished crap onto the market without a financial penalty that refunds could provide.

    Personally, I have zero trust of any gaming company anymore. I've been stuck with games that were broken messes, had horrific monetization schemes patched in after launch, or that had their feature roadmaps completely thrown out. That's in addition to a few just plain bad games. Broad refund solutions are needed.

    They're games. If you don't trust the companies then don't buy their products. Have a little personal responsibility. Government intervention is the last thing we need. Dang. Listen to yourself.
    Reply