Skip to main content

Cyberpunk 2077: Biggest Game Launch in History, Stock Price Continues to Drop Anyway

CD Project Red
(Image credit: CD Project Red)

Cyberpunk 2077 has been a massive hit in the gaming industry, reaching a record-setting 8 million pre-orders before launch and breaking the world record for the most concurrent players on Steam for a single-player game. But even with all that in mind, CD Projekt Red's stocks have fallen by 29% (at the time of writing) since December 10.

Despite the apparently resounding success in the sales department, it appears the company has disappointed its stockholders. Even after the record-setting launch yesterday, CD Projekt Red's stock prices fell by 7.3% (from PLN 390.6 to around PLN 362). That follows a pre-launch slide that began on December 10. 

The continuing stock pricing erosion may seem very bizarre considering the amazing success the game has produced both before and after launch. Apparently, the price drop stems from Cyberpunk 2077's day one bugs and glitches that have been a focus of launch reviews and also shared across social media platforms by frustrated (or amused) players. 

It is truly annoying to have day one glitches that hinder gameplay, but it is almost impossible to avoid on launch day. Other hugely successful AAA titles, like The Witcher 3, have also had game-breaking launch-day bugs that were patched later. It's simply how game launches go, and it can't really be avoided unless the entire gaming community beta tests the game. It's worth noting that not everyone has experienced these game-breaking bugs – many people are enjoying Night City without encountering serious issues. 

It's just the way it goes when you have a game that can run on a variety of operating systems, PC components, and consoles – incompatibilities and errata are unavoidable. However, the severity and persistence of some of Cyberpunk 2077's bugs obviously have the investment community concerned. Given the game's success, we can expect the company's stock prices to improve once Cyberpunk 2077 stabilizes and more rounds of patches come out that improve game stability and add more features.   

  • Awev
    You had me laughing at the end, we should expect day one bug fixes, and a broken game/piece of software? Ok, not everyone has the same system, yet when it is broken on closed systems such as PS# or XBox Whatevery you can't really tell me to expect something broken. The only thing that changes with that is the tv/monitor, and maybe gamepad, and even then, enough is set in stone that you should only issue updates to add content, not repair something. And you can still do a better job with the PC community - no need for anything to be launched broken.
    Reply
  • Rogavactive
    Awev said:
    You had me laughing at the end, we should expect day one bug fixes, and a broken game/piece of software? Ok, not everyone has the same system, yet when it is broken on closed systems such as PS# or XBox Whatevery you can't really tell me to expect something broken. The only thing that changes with that is the tv/monitor, and maybe gamepad, and even then, enough is set in stone that you should only issue updates to add content, not repair something. And you can still do a better job with the PC community - no need for anything to be launched broken.
    Well, games for different consoles are written on different engines. languages and interface on which it communicates with devices are not the same. It is not writing a game on Unity. They have their own engine - "RED"
    Reply
  • helper800
    Awev said:
    You had me laughing at the end, we should expect day one bug fixes, and a broken game/piece of software? Ok, not everyone has the same system, yet when it is broken on closed systems such as PS# or XBox Whatevery you can't really tell me to expect something broken. The only thing that changes with that is the tv/monitor, and maybe gamepad, and even then, enough is set in stone that you should only issue updates to add content, not repair something. And you can still do a better job with the PC community - no need for anything to be launched broken.
    You have me laughing because your perspective is entirely consumer biased with no consideration to the monumental task that is releasing a AAA game to market that is this large. There has been no major game release ever without any bugs at all. I suspect that CDPR wasn't expecting to release the game on 7+ year old console hardware until it was too late in the production cycle for a smooth running release product.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    helper800 said:
    I suspect that CDPR wasn't expecting to release the game on 7+ year old console hardware until it was too late in the production cycle for a smooth running release product.
    This game was announced in 2012, and a teaser trailer for it was released in early 2013, before that console hardware even launched.

    I guess people are also a little less accepting of the issues due to how long the game was in production, especially since it was delayed an extra 10 months this year. It's probably not all that unreasonable to expect 10 months to be enough time to fix most glaring issues, but even on PC, it sounds like there are a lot of rough edges.

    On the positive side, CD Projekt has a history of fixing up and significantly improving their games post launch, which is more than can be said for some other developers of open world titles, like Bethesda, who have a tendency to release broken games and leave it up to modders to fix their mess as best as they can in the years that follow.

    Those buying games at launch really need to learn that its typically better for them to wait though. Apparently Cyberpunk had 8 million pre-orders across all platforms by the time it came out, which works out to hundreds of millions of dollars in sales, and there will undoubtedly be a lot of people experiencing a poor first impression of it. Why pay a launch-price premium to beta test a game, when you will likely be able to experience it in a more polished form sometime next year, and probably at half the price?
    Reply
  • Fiorezy
    cryoburner said:
    This game was announced in 2012, and a teaser trailer for it was released in early 2013, before that console hardware even launched.

    I guess people are also a little less accepting of the issues due to how long the game was in production, especially since it was delayed an extra 10 months this year. It's probably not all that unreasonable to expect 10 months to be enough time to fix most glaring issues, but even on PC, it sounds like there are a lot of rough edges.

    On the positive side, CD Projekt has a history of fixing up and significantly improving their games post launch, which is more than can be said for some other developers of open world titles, like Bethesda, who have a tendency to release broken games and leave it up to modders to fix their mess as best as they can in the years that follow.

    Those buying games at launch really need to learn that its typically better for them to wait though. Apparently Cyberpunk had 8 million pre-orders across all platforms by the time it came out, which works out to hundreds of millions of dollars in sales, and there will undoubtedly be a lot of people experiencing a poor first impression of it. Why pay a launch-price premium to beta test a game, when you will likely be able to experience it in a more polished form sometime next year, and probably at half the price?
    Please stop making excuses and blaming the customers, CDPR and only CDPR takes the blame for this mess, they knew since the start that their game is still not ready, yet they kept announcing a launch date then delay it over and over again, they could've just made one announcement before all of this happens that the game is not ready and the launch will be delayed for another year or so instead of teasing us and making everyone angry with their delays. Every delay was at the excuse of refining and fixing the bugs, and we as customers were expecting that we will still encounter some acceptable glitches and bugs, but we never expected this mess! Unplayable on base consoles and mid-range rigs? Missing most basic features ie. customizing the character after starting the game, and that questionable NPC behavior along with the police system, even GTA 3 from 2001 did better.
    Reply
  • Awev
    helper800 said:
    You have me laughing because your perspective is entirely consumer biased with no consideration to the monumental task that is releasing a AAA game to market that is this large. There has been no major game release ever without any bugs at all. I suspect that CDPR wasn't expecting to release the game on 7+ year old console hardware until it was too late in the production cycle for a smooth running release product.
    If you buy a car you expect to be able to drive it, not have to wait for the engineers to figure out how to get the spark plugs firing in the right order, or find the proper sized engine. Almost like announcing a horn that will work on a Model T, while the Model A is still in production, and it still will not work properly on a Chrysler K car. And yes, I am a consumer, and I want what I pay for, so if I am paying full retail price then I expect something new and shiny that works, not used, old, rusted, and ready to discarded.

    If you have to release the product early, with less content, yet in working order, then do it. Then you can offer DLCs, expansion paks, free upgrades - not just updates - to early adapters, or any other number of things. Just don't go jerking my chain, selling me a yacht and only giving me a row boat.

    I am just wondering, do you work for a military contractor, where major cost overruns are the normal, with pushed back deadlines, and things just getting cancelled after costing the tax payer billions of dollars because the manufacture fails to deliver? Or do you work on the forth coming game Star Citizen? You know the one, people crowd funded it, they have an alpha version to play (test), and yet it seems as if it will never be finished/published, because the goals and expectations keep getting pushed back and higher? I don't have unlimited time and money to throw at a game that fails to deliver what they promised, nor when, so yes, I am a consumer, and take that point of view. And I will hold the company responsible for their actions, or lack thereof.
    Reply
  • helper800
    Awev said:
    If you buy a car you expect to be able to drive it, not have to wait for the engineers to figure out how to get the spark plugs firing in the right order, or find the proper sized engine. Almost like announcing a horn that will work on a Model T, while the Model A is still in production, and it still will not work properly on a Chrysler K car. And yes, I am a consumer, and I want what I pay for, so if I am paying full retail price then I expect something new and shiny that works, not used, old, rusted, and ready to discarded.

    If you have to release the product early, with less content, yet in working order, then do it. Then you can offer DLCs, expansion paks, free upgrades - not just updates - to early adapters, or any other number of things. Just don't go jerking my chain, selling me a yacht and only giving me a row boat.

    I am just wondering, do you work for a military contractor, where major cost overruns are the normal, with pushed back deadlines, and things just getting cancelled after costing the tax payer billions of dollars because the manufacture fails to deliver? Or do you work on the forth coming game Star Citizen? You know the one, people crowd funded it, they have an alpha version to play (test), and yet it seems as if it will never be finished/published, because the goals and expectations keep getting pushed back and higher? I don't have unlimited time and money to throw at a game that fails to deliver what they promised, nor when, so yes, I am a consumer, and take that point of view. And I will hold the company responsible for their actions, or lack thereof.
    My point is that there is no product on earth except maybe in the medical industries that takes more work to complete to a level competence as a modern day AAA game. I can almost guarantee over a few million man hours went into this game to the state that it is in. The only ones at fault are CDPR's PR team being too good at their job and launching astronomical expectations for a game thus setting it up to miss the mark no matter how good it was. Although as others have stated that the game was in production 7+ years ago they do not understand that when making a game optimizations and bug fixes are the last possible thing that is done in a production cycle. Those 10 months of delay were probably the entirety of that very process. To expect a company to optimize its game for 7+ hardware deployments with many of those pieces of hardware having multiple versions of different performance metrics is insanity.
    Reply
  • Awev
    @helper800 So, are you saying that CDPR should get a free pass because their marketing team is better at their job than their coding team? Just imagine if Boeing took the same stance, and launched the 737 Max needing a day zero bug fix, and a lot of updates following it, just to get off the ground. So, you want me to consider this another No Man's Sky, and wait a couple years till they fix most of the problems? :rolleyes:

    It still does not matter when the testing and quality assurance is done, it is part of the project. If I waited until the house is built before checking on measurements I could end up with a house that needs to be tore down because it is sitting to close to a property line, is out of square, and out of level, in addition to a number of things not being properly installed - such as plumbing and electrical just to name two. So, are you hinting at the idea that the testing was just an afterthought for CDPR?

    I play a couple games that have been around for a good number of years. No, I did not start playing them when they first came out, as I never heard about them until two years ago or so. They started off with DirectX 9 being a requirement, and it was a popular standard when they launched the games. They have continued to update the game, adding new features, improving the physics, etc. Now they are at the point where they require DirectX 11, and have left some of their customers behind. They stay in business by providing good games, updating the tech behind them, and providing down load content (DLCs) and such. So the older versions still work on the older hardware, and you can tell Steam not to update the game any more, and it works on new hardware as well, and even better than before. If the games did not live up to the hype to begin with I would not be talking about them now, they could of ended up in the waste bin/recycling bin of the desktops.

    People do make tires that work with a three cylinder diesel, an in-line 4 and 6 cylinder gas engines, along with V6 and V8 engines. The wheel might need to be adapted, say a four bolt pattern for the smaller cars with smaller engines, and maybe a five bolt pattern for the larger gas engines, yet the wheel works with all of them.

    If you don't find the time to do it right the first time when are you going to find the time to redo it? Sorry, but no free pass from me.

    And here is something for the fun of it The 12 Bugs of Christmas According to day 12 it is not a bug, it is a new feature. :p
    Reply