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Fujitsu Develops Optical Tech Unlocking 1.2 Tbps per Wavelength

Fujitsu's self-contained networking
(Image credit: Fujitsu)

Fujitsu today announced it cracked Tbps+ speeds on fiber networking communication, unlocking the ability to transfer the equivalent to six 25GB Blu-ray discs in a single second. 

The company announced its most recent photonics technology (which is expected to have market availability by early 2023) unlocks up to 1.2 Tbps per wavelength, while enabling four times longer signal reach before the signal begins to decohere. With the roll-out of 5G tech and the development of even faster communication protocols, there'll be a greater and greater need to efficiently and rapidly shuffle data around — something photonics is particularly keen at.

Fujitsu claims breakthroughs across the board; not only are the signal reach and bandwidth per wavelength figures unheard of, but the company also managed to cut power consumption down to an industry-leading 120mW per transmission capacity (Gbps). 

The approach is an integrated one, and isn't limited to materials breakthroughs. Fujitsu designed its new optical networking solution in parallel with the world's first liquid-cooling solution for optical networking. A state-of-the-art digital signal processing LSI (DSP) is also deployed in the self-contained solution, which even pairs a low-level machine learning capability that aims to optimize power consumption and traffic. 

This last point is crucial as, according to Fujitsu, an optical networking system is rarely optimized to its implementation environment, and can't easily adapt to changing circumstances (such as signal or equipment degradation). The company says implementation of its machine learning system makes it possible to automatically capture and analyze the status of optical network components such as optical fibers and optical transmission systems with a high degree of accuracy, allowing for on-the-fly adjustments according to operating conditions.

All the innovations have led to a system that isn't limited to breaking records in the amount of data it can transmit. Fujitsu's networking solution also occupies a third of the space of a conventional air-cooled optical networking solution and has a greater operational capacity due to the improved cooling system. 

According to the company, all these improvements have led to a severely cut-down CO2 footprint for their networking solution (the company quotes a 70% reduction across manufacturing, logistics, and operation), which is definitely more than a simple checkmark on the "environmental sustainability" book.

Francisco Pires
Freelance News Writer

Francisco Pires is a freelance news writer for Tom's Hardware with a soft side for quantum computing.

  • InvalidError
    120mW per Gbps... so 144W for 1.2Tbps. That is going to be one toasty optical transceiver and DSP. Not surprised they are using liquid cooling there.
    Reply
  • gernstsmit
    Why use tbps to measure speed? Neither it or blu-rays per second has any real world meaning. Say 153.6 GB/s and suddenly everyone can comprehend the speed. Idiots.
    Reply
  • jp7189
    gernstsmit said:
    Why use tbps to measure speed? Neither it or blu-rays per second has any real world meaning. Say 153.6 GB/s and suddenly everyone can comprehend the speed. Idiots.
    ... because every network engineer since the dawn of time has standardized on bits per second as the measurement to compare layer 1 speeds.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    jp7189 said:
    ... because every network engineer since the dawn of time has standardized on bits per second as the measurement to compare layer 1 speeds.
    Bauds were also a thing to separate symbol rate from bits per symbol in L1 protocols encoding more than one bit per transition. Still in use in technical documents when digging down to individual OFDM sub-carriers in modern-day analog protocols, useless in user-facing literature when modern OFDM-centric protocols have variable baud rates and bits per symbol depending on SNR, channel properties across a given sub-carrier's frequency band and regulatory limits across any given sub-band.
    Reply
  • Kamen Rider Blade
    gernstsmit said:
    Why use tbps to measure speed? Neither it or blu-rays per second has any real world meaning. Say 153.6 GB/s and suddenly everyone can comprehend the speed. Idiots.
    Do they not teach you the metric system?

    Do you not comprehend how the Metric System scales units?

    You should be easily be able to tell the difference between <Metric Prefix>bps (bit per second) and <Metric Prefix>Bps (Byte per second).
    Reply
  • TJ Hooker
    gernstsmit said:
    Why use tbps to measure speed? Neither it or blu-rays per second has any real world meaning. Say 153.6 GB/s and suddenly everyone can comprehend the speed. Idiots.
    Is your issue with using bits instead of bytes, or using Tera prefix instead of Giga? Neither complaint makes any sense, just curious. Contrary to your claim, "Tbps" very obviously has "real world meaning".
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    What will this do for my online poker game, and Fantasy Football league stats?
    Reply
  • Dingledooda
    gernstsmit said:
    Say 153.6 GB/s and suddenly everyone can comprehend the speed. Idiots.

    Its not 153.6GB/s it's 150GB/s.

    If you want to use IT Gigabytes (which is 8,589,934,592 bits now called a Gibibyte) then it would only be 139.7GiB/s as you are not converting from an IT terabit (which is 1,099,511,627,776 bits now called a tebibit) but an actual terabit which is 1,200,00,00,00 bits.
    Reply