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LG G Pad II 10.1 Shipping This Fall With Snapdragon 800, 1920x1200 Display

LG unveiled the LG G Pad II 10.1, its highest-end tablet yet, which should come at an affordable price point this fall. The tablet will come in both Wi-Fi only and LTE, and it will be available in North America, Europe and Asia.

Although it's LG's highest-end tablet yet, the device looks to be rather a "high-value" tablet than a high-end one. It comes with a Snapdragon 800 processor, WUXGA (1920 x 1200) 10.1" display (as its name implies) and 16 GB of storage, which is a little on the low side these days, especially for a tablet.

However, it also has microSD card support, so that should help with the low internal storage, at least for media. If LG ever upgrades the tablet from its current Android 5.1.1 to "Android M," then that extra microSD card storage could be used to install more apps as well.

The cameras don't seem like anything special, with a 5MP shooter on the back and a 2MP on the front, which should be good for the occasional picture you're going to take with your 10.1" tablet, but likely no more than that.

The battery seems to be of a decent size at 7,400 mAh, which is slightly bigger than the 6,700 mAh battery inside the Nexus 9 for instance, but smaller than the 9,000 mAh one inside the older Nexus 10. LG said only that it's going to "keep you entertained for hours on end," without promising a more specific battery life number.

The tablet will weigh 489g, which makes it slightly heavier than the smaller Nexus 9 at 425g and about 100g heavier than the Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet.

In terms of connectivity, the LG G Pad II 10.1 supports Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n/ac, USB 2.0, A-GPS and LTE Cat. 4 (but at a higher price point).

LG talked about some software features that the tablet has as well, such as the Reader Mode, which reduces blue light that can cause eye fatigue and blurred vision after long hours of reading. It also has a "Dual Window" feature, which allows users to play with two apps at the same time.

QuickMemo+, another feature, gives users the ability to create and share memos from any screen without having to use a separate app. The tablet also comes pre-loaded with Microsoft Office for Android Tablet and 100 GB of free OneDrive storage for two years.

All the details about the LG G Pad II 10.1 will be revealed at IFA next week. The tablet is expected to launch in North America, Europe and Asia, where both the Wi-Fi and LTE models will be available. LG hinted at keeping the same $250 price tag that the original LG G Pad 10.1 had.

"The LG G Pad II 10.1 was developed in response to consumers' feedback and optimized for multimedia consumption." said Chris Yie, vice president and head of marketing communications for LG Mobile Communications Company. "Customers asked for a large display, bigger battery and faster performance all without raising the price. The G Pad II delivers on all counts."

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  • chicofehr
    16:10? I thought that was history.
    Reply
  • g-unit1111
    That's a very nicely designed tablet but 16GB storage is rather weak. Devices like that should have at minimum 32GB. Asus makes a tablet with 64GB onboard and 128GB micro SXHD expansion and sells it for less than $300.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    16514614 said:
    16:10? I thought that was history.
    On desktops and phones, it is uncommon. On tablets, the majority are 16:10 with either 1280x800, 1920x1200 or 2560x1600 displays to make up for the space usually hogged by the on-screen system keys and make it a more convenient reading format.
    Reply
  • Kennyy Evony
    Asus tablets are also the worst. Newegg is still trying to sell all the nexus 7 tablets at 139 bucks that Asus made for them and they get bricked a lot as well as connector issues and other problems. Others made by Asus are just the same nothing but door stoppers. Asus in general is a good company but mix them and the tablet it becomes worse tablet than those made by 3rd party Chinese.
    Reply
  • targetdrone
    That's a very nicely designed tablet but 16GB storage is rather weak. Devices like that should have at minimum 32GB. Asus makes a tablet with 64GB onboard and 128GB micro SXHD expansion and sells it for less than $300.

    If they put more onboard memory they would "have" to charge $350/$450 for 32GB/64GB. Going with 16GB is a cost saving measure and the SD slot lets us add 64GB for about $20 - $30 but I hope they went with SDXC so we can go with 128GB.

    The only thing I don't get is, why USB 2?
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    16515616 said:
    Asus tablets are also the worst. Newegg is still trying to sell all the nexus 7 tablets at 139 bucks that Asus made for them and they get bricked a lot as well as connector issues and other problems.
    I haven't had any issues with bricking on my N7 but the connectors are indeed junk and most Asus tablets that I have seen also have issues with backlight flicker, which can be very annoying.

    16515744 said:
    The only thing I don't get is, why USB 2?
    How many people will actually mind? For a budget-oriented device, I would much prefer not being forced to buy expensive Type-C cables. Since they are using the Snapdragon 800 in there, it likely lacks the necessary hardware to handle Type-C connectors anyway, which would force USB3 support in the form of the wide Type-B connector practically nobody ever used.
    Reply
  • pierrerock
    16514614 said:
    16:10? I thought that was history.
    On desktops and phones, it is uncommon. On tablets, the majority are 16:10 with either 1280x800, 1920x1200 or 2560x1600 displays to make up for the space usually hogged by the on-screen system keys and make it a more convenient reading format.

    In fact 16:10 is what is the closest to the Golden Ratio, The vision ratio we are given by our eyes. So this ratio should become the next standard not history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16:10
    Reply
  • g-unit1111
    If they put more onboard memory they would "have" to charge $350/$450 for 32GB/64GB. Going with 16GB is a cost saving measure and the SD slot lets us add 64GB for about $20 - $30 but I hope they went with SDXC so we can go with 128GB.

    Not necessarily. Screen size, aspect ratio and resolution determine the price of a tablet more than storage capacity. Most of the time tablet manufacturers tack on the extra storage to entice buyers to purchase the model with the higher end screens. Take a closer look at the specs of the higher end models vs. the lower end models next time you browse Newegg or Best Buy.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    16628235 said:
    Screen size, aspect ratio and resolution determine the price of a tablet more than storage capacity.
    Production volume has a much bigger impact on price than size or aspect ratio, with the high-volume panels ending up much cheaper than anything else.

    You see that on desktops with 1080p displays all the way under $100, lower resolutions often being more expensive and higher resolutions being scarcely available below $300. Similarly, UHD display prices are dropping very quickly and are undercutting many 1440p/1600p displays of similar size and comparable quality. For tablets, you see 7" and 8" devices with 800p displays overlapping from $100 to $300 with a few 1200p devices in either screen size around the $200 price point every now and then. There is no clear correlation between display size, resolution and price when using off-the-shelf panels.

    The main reason manufacturers charge huge premiums on their premium phones and tablets is: because they (still) can. Once mid-range tablet manufacturers get serious, high-end tablet manufacturers will have a much harder time charging $200 extra for $50 worth of improved parts on top of the $100-200 base model premium. Example of tablet that might make people think twice about $500+ high-end tablets: ZenPad S8, $200 for 32GB storage, 2GB RAM, 2048x1536 8" display, $300 for 64GB of storage, 4GB RAM, a slightly faster SoC and Type-C connector.
    Reply