Russian Company MCST Builds 'Elbrus-4C' CPU That Emulates x86 Programs

The Russian company MCST (Moscow Center for SPARC Technologies) released its quad-core Elbrus-4C CPU that will target high-performance PCs and servers.

Despite the company's own name, the chip is actually built on the proprietary "Elbrus" instruction set architecture and not on SPARC. The CPU cores are clocked only at 800 MHz each, and the chip is manufactured on a rather old 65 nm process. The chip has a TDP of 45 W, which isn't too bad considering its target market.

However, the performance may be lacking. Going by the MCST's own benchmarks (shown above and below), the CPU is only compared with older Atom chips that used to target netbooks or (also old) "Pentium-M" notebook processors. Even if the Elbrus-4C wins by a large margin in the floating point score, it does so against obsolete processors. When it is compared against the others for integer performance, the difference is much smaller.

The Elbrus architecture is a highly parallel VLIW architecture that executes instructions in the order established and optimized by the compiler. This is unlike other architectures, where the processors decide which instructions go first, which ones have to wait, and so on. This should help the Russian company build simpler (and cheaper) CPUs than the competition, at least in theory.

The architecture also allows for an easier emulation of x86 programs. The Russian government and Russian companies may want to reduce their dependence on Intel and AMD x86 CPUs, but in practice they will still have to depend on x86 programs, at least for a while longer, as few would probably want to target MCST's proprietary CPUs right now.

MCST is also selling a full computer (called Elbrus ARM-401) that comes with an Elbrus-4C-compatible Linux distro, although it also said that it's compatible with (the now obsolete and unpatched) Windows XP OS, as well as other x86 operating systems.

Pricing is unknown for the Elbrus-4C CPU, but considering it's barely faster than an old Atom CPU and is built on a 65 nm process, it's probably not going to cost too much.

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  • Anonymous
    Reminds me of the Loongson, it too emulated some x86 instructions. And was built on the 65 nm process. Maybe it came as part of a technological exchange between China and Russia.

    Couldn't Russia just buy an ARM licence, the fab the chips themselves, to ensure no backdoors or other nasty stuff? If that's the goal. And then emulate x86 via a virtual machine? Sounds a lot simpler than reinventing the wheel only to end up with a low performance chip. And TDP doesn't mean much. It's actually pretty high for a 800 Mhz chip @ 65 nm.
  • childofthekorn
    Just the start of the technological independence we're going to be seeing. Sanctions away and the customers will be led astray. Still curious if the sanctions and ban of US tech companies providing russia with goods and services hindered resellers, if they keep stocks on hand of course.
  • Larry Litmanen
    Quote:
    Just the start of the technological independence we're going to be seeing. Sanctions away and the customers will be led astray. Still curious if the sanctions and ban of US tech companies providing russia with goods and services hindered resellers, if they keep stocks on hand of course.


    Those sanctions are as effective as Iraq sanctions. All it means is Russian economy will be shifting to tech that uses Chinese or Korean tech.