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Bleeding Edge: Stable Release of Microsoft's New Browser Leaks

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It's no secret that Microsoft's rebuilding its Edge browser around the Chromium project at the heart of Google Chrome. But now it appear's the company's getting closer to finally releasing this new version of Edge. Hardware LUXX reported today that it found a stable version of the browser on Microsoft's servers via Google.

Microsoft announced its plans to rebuild Edge in December 2018. It then revealed (opens in new tab) that the browser would have "addons" in March and invited Windows Insider Program members to test the browser (opens in new tab) in April. People didn't have to install that version of Edge, though, and it didn't replace the old version if they did.

In May, the company said the Chromium-based version of Edge would feature an Internet Explorer mode (opens in new tab)to access legacy sites without actually having to use the ancient browser. Microsoft said that Edge would make its way to macOS for the first time, too, and revealed other features (opens in new tab) arriving with the new version of the browser.

A version of the new Edge for Arm devices leaked (opens in new tab) in June. That hardly came as a surprise--Microsoft's been trying to make Windows 10 (opens in new tab) on Arm happen for years--but it was good to know the company hadn't forgotten its non-x86-using customers. The browser was officially made available in beta (opens in new tab) on Windows 10 and macOS in August.

Now, a stable version of Edge can be found on Microsoft's servers with a quick Google search, and you can download it through this link (opens in new tab). Warning: unlike previous releases, this version of Edge will replace the one currently installed on a device and the only way to restore the old version is to reinstall Windows 10.

Would it be safer to wait for Microsoft to officially release this version of Edge instead of downloading it before the company formally launched it? Yes. But it's out there, and it's a Tuesday. Downloading a new Microsoft browser that accidentally leaked is probably the most exciting thing that could happen today.

Nathaniel Mott
Nathaniel Mott

Nathaniel Mott is a freelance news and features writer for Tom's Hardware US, covering breaking news, security, and the silliest aspects of the tech industry.