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Microsoft Fends Off 3.47 Tbps DDOS Attack on Azure Servers

A hacker with a hood up looking at a computer screen.
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Microsoft just countered a record-breaking 3.47 Tbps DDoS attack on its Azure servers in Asia according to a blog post (opens in new tab) by the company. That, it says, is the largest mitigated attack in history.

According to Azure Networking product manager Alethea Toh, the attack occurred sometime in November, targeting an Azure customer in Asia. He believes this was the largest attack to ever be reported in history.

The attack originated from roughly 10,000 sources across the world, using a combination of multiple attack methods for UDP reflection on port 80 including, SSDP, CLDAP, DNS, and NTP. The attack lasted around 15 minutes.

But this isn't the only large attack Microsoft has had to deal with over the past few months. In December Microsoft also had to deal with another attack that was nearly as large at 3.25 Tbps, but lasted far longer.

According to Microsoft, these attacks, are part of an unprecedented amount of attacks seen over the course of the second half of 2021 around the world. In India alone, Microsoft saw a 30-fold increase in DDoS attacks in October. But that is just one part of the story

During the 2021 year, Microsoft has mitigated 40% more attacks in the second half of the year compared to the first half. On August 10th alone, Microsoft saw a whopping 4,296 attacks.

A big reason DDoS attacks have escalated so much during the end of 2021 is related to DDoS "for hire" services, which Microsoft notes, are incredibly cheap these days to acquire. Giving hackers more incentive to push more attacks.

Despite this, Microsoft has been able to thwart every single attack aimed at it thus far. Let's hope the company's team of highly skilled engineers can continue to do so for the foreseeable future.

Aaron Klotz
Aaron Klotz

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • jkflipflop98
    Whenever a story like this comes out, I always imagine some hardcore coder nerd down in the bowels of microsoft crack his knuckles and smirk before putting on a master class.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    I can't imagine there is a purpose behind this other than to divert attention away from somewhere else. (Hide traffic in the attack)
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    digitalgriffin said:
    I can't imagine there is a purpose behind this other than to divert attention away from somewhere else. (Hide traffic in the attack)
    Reply
  • Endymio
    A big reason DDoS attacks have escalated so much during the end of 2021 is related to DDoS "for hire" services, which Microsoft notes, are incredibly cheap these days to acquire. Giving hackers more incentive to push more attacks.
    An editor to Aisle 3, please -- stat.
    Reply