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Nintendo Looks Into Its Closet Of Game Systems Past

Now that Nintendo has shipped its NES Classic Edition and Famicon Classic Edition consoles, the company decided to look in the closet and break out one of the originals.

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The Famicon was Nintendo’s first home game console, which launched the company into millions of homes worldwide. If you are unfamiliar with the Famicon, you probably know it better as the NES. Both the NES and Famicon are functionally identical and played the same games, but each had unique game cartridges and different designs.

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Nintendo apparently has several of these consoles in storage, as well as the Disk System add-on that Nintendo only released for the Famicon in Japan.

The company opted to take out one of these consoles and a Disk System add-on to do an unboxing. This gives us a rare look at one of these original 30-year-old-systems new in the box.

Nintendo also had a Disk Writer in storage, which is another device that will be familiar to our readers in Japan. Nintendo used the Disk Write and re-writeable game cartridges to sell and rent games during the life of the NES.

Although video games have come a long way over the last three decades, the NES and Famicon hold a special place in the heart of numerous gamers that grew up with one of these consoles. The NES Classic Edition and Famicon Classic Edition consoles give gamers a chance to relive some of these games, but for some, these devices will never replace the originals.

  • CDdude55
    Probably trying to hint that NX is cartridge based.
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    I've said it before and I'll say it again...interest in retro gaming is increasing. All the crap that is released lately like broken games and games that are effectively online only with little single player are being skipped by many. Especially considering today so many idiot kids are online cheating, trolling, cussing, etc.

    Today's brats have just taken away from the joy of online gaming. Thankfully I still have my Sega Genesis, N64, and two retro PC gaming rigs to re-live the days when gaming was great.
    Reply
  • IInuyasha74
    18730966 said:
    I've said it before and I'll say it again...interest in retro gaming is increasing. All the crap that is released lately like broken games and games that are effectively online only with little single player are being skipped by many. Especially considering today so many idiot kids are online cheating, trolling, cussing, etc.

    Today's brats have just taken away from the joy of online gaming. Thankfully I still have my Sega Genesis, N64, and two retro PC gaming rigs to re-live the days when gaming was great.

    I don't know if that is true, but I kinda hope so. I used to play Halo online and I occasionally like to play co-op on games like Dynasty Warriors, but outside of that I exclusively play video games that I can play alone. Anything that is MMO or attempts to push you into interacting with other players I won't look twice at. My biggest hope for gaming industry is that it will focus less on multiplayer and begin to see the value in single-player games again. Unfortunately, I doubt that will happen though.
    Reply
  • memadmax
    Now give me a SNES classic edition and I will forgive you for the WiiU...

    ^.^
    Reply
  • synphul
    Retro does seem to be pretty popular, both in gaming and other things. Audio for instance, a lot of people look back at things like 8 track, cassette, cd etc and have a good laugh but vinyl records which predate all of those have steadily been becoming more popular. According to Fortune they're at a 28yr high for sales as of April this year. Self printing cameras like the polaroid were featured at CES 2016.

    I don't think it will turn people away from current game titles but despite the horrible (by today's standards) graphics the old games are nostalgic for many and offered a lot of fun game play.

    I've got to agree with 10tacle on some points. The newer games are being shoved out before they're completely polished, glitches, massive updates on day one, poor optimization. That's the sort of rookie mistakes I'd expect from indie games, not AAA titles. It's disheartening when gamers get all excited and look forward to something only to find out there's stuttering, frame drops all over the place, the game won't get above 20-30fps on the new 144mhz monitor they purchased even when using top tier hardware.

    I don't personally play a lot of games online in multiplayer, just a small handful of flash based games through social media. The cheating, trolling and general behavior between opponents from other teams/clans is ridiculous.

    They say shooter type games invoke violence? I've seen the most generic of games similar to farmville incite people to the point of threats and the type of language that would make a gangster flinch and road rage seem like a quiet drive through the country. Hate to see what it's like on a real time combat game with all the trash talk.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    I have made more by selling and collecting retro video games than by putting 50k$ in investments.

    I have games like Super Mario RPG, Super Metroid, Super Castlevania, Mega Man X, Contra Alian Wars, Brainlord, Lufia II, Secret of Mana, Soulblazer, Final Fantasy III... to name a few

    All complete and in incredible condition. My collection worth easily 5000$ and is easily to recoup on. I bought when the frenzy was starting in 2010-2011 and I made 3X my initial investment in value.
    Reply
  • TripleHeinz
    FamicoM ;)
    But if we consider the context then I think it sounds valid as Famicon(sole).
    Good article.
    Reply
  • IInuyasha74
    18732344 said:
    FamicoM ;)
    But if we consider the context then I think it sounds valid as Famicon(sole).
    Good article.

    Famicom is actually the current spelling. It is short for Family Computer (or ファミリーコンピュータ in Japanese Katakana). I know it seems strange, as we think of them today as consoles, but Nintendo originally viewed it as basically a specialized gaming Computer, sort of like Amiga's Commador 64. That's part of why it has the disk system shown above. Nintendo also sold a Famicom Modem as well, which allowed you to connect to early Internet services. Those features never made it into the North American NES, otherwise we might have viewed it more as a computer too.

    Anyway, glad you liked the article.
    Reply
  • Alexalexalexalex
    I like these console. To be honest I also like old vinyls and retro things.
    Reply
  • ottawanker
    The Famicom wasn't their first console, they had the Color TV Game series first, and possibly others.
    Reply