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Ryzen 7000 Retailer Pricing Shows Big Hike Over Ryzen 5000

Zen 4 CPU
Zen 4 CPU (Image credit: AMD)

Preliminary pricing of AMD's new Ryzen 7000 Zen 4 Processors has appeared online, thanks to a heads-up by momomo_us on Twitter, (opens in new tab) with values that are much higher than AMD's Ryzen 5000 parts currently. The lowest-end Zen 4 CPU of the bunch -- the Ryzen 5 7600X, starts at $340, while the flagship Ryzen 9 7950X starts at a whopping $906.

The pricing comes from PC Canada, and hardware is more expensive outside the U.S. market. There's also a possibility that the listings are placeholders, so treat the pricing with a bit of salt. Compared to MSRP, these prices are reasonable, netting around a 10% to 12% price hike compared to Ryzen 5000 when it first launched. But, these prices are much more drastic now that Ryzen 5000 has been out for a few years and highly discounted in recent months.

These higher prices, combined with more expensive AM5 motherboards and even more expensive DDR5 memory, will make Ryzen 7000 a costly platform to acquire, more so than even Intel Alder Lake systems.

AMD Ryzen 7000 Pricing

Ryzen 7000 Pricing Converted from CAD to USD
CPUOriginal PriceConverted (USD) Price
Ryzen 5 7600X$435$340
Ryzen 7 7700X$631$494
Ryzen 9 7900X$798$625
Ryzen 9 7950X$1,158$906

Ryzen 7000 will likely arrive in less than a month (rumored September 15 launch) and will bring a whole host of improvements to the Ryzen platform, including the new AM5 socket, PCIe 5.0, and DDR5 support, plus unique performance enhancements.

Official performance improvements compared to Ryzen 5000 have gone up by 18% in general, with single-threaded performance going up by 15% and multi-threaded going up by 35%. These improvements come from the new Zen 4 architecture, bringing an 8 to 10% IPC bump to the cores and a giant clock speed jump to 5.5GHz.

Like with the previous two Ryzen generations, AMD is not increasing core counts for this generation, with Ryzen 7000's peak maintained at 16. Six, eight, twelve, and sixteen core models will be available at launch, according to earl rumors. We expect quad-core Ryzen 3 chips to complete the Ryzen 7000 lineup eventually.

Ryzen 7000 Preliminary Prices Versus Intel 12th Gen and Ryzen 5000 -- Newegg August 14
Ryzen 7000 PricingRyzen 5000 PricingIntel 12th Gen Alder Lake Pricing
Ryzen 5 7600X - $340Ryzen 5 5600X - $199Core i5 12600K - $279
Ryzen 7 7700X - $494Ryzen 7 5700X - $268Core i7 12700K - $399
Ryzen 9 7900X - $625Ryzen 9 5900X - $398Core i9 12900K - $589
Ryzen 9 7950X - $906Ryzen 9 5950X - $546Core i9 12900KS - $734

It will be interesting to see how Ryzen 7000 behaves in the market after launch. Not only does AMD have to compete with Intel, with both its Alder Lake and upcoming Raptor Lake parts, but AMD also has to compete with itself, with its previous generation Ryzen 5000 being so cheap right now. If history is anything to go by, AMD will probably discount Zen 3 processors continuously at a gradual pace, until the company stops producing them altogether.

An excellent example of this will be the Ryzen 7 5800X3D. Suppose current rumors are true that this chip will receive its first significant price cut before Ryzen 7000 launches. In that case, it'll be an entirely legitimate competitor against the upcoming Ryzen 5 7600X and Ryzen 7700X for gamers on a budget. In addition, we've seen the Ryzen 7 5800X3D outperform the Core i9-12900K with a manual overclock. So it will be no slouch against next-generation CPUs in terms of gaming performance.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • Drazen
    And at the same time we have worrying stories from Intel and AMD how PC market is collapsing being lowest in 30 years.
    I spent 2000+ just 2 years ago on Ryzen 3900 and should I now bin everything and spend 4000 on something a bit more faster?
    Reply
  • AnonymousTechTips
    Drazen said:
    And at the same time we have worrying stories from Intel and AMD how PC market is collapsing being lowest in 30 years.
    I spent 2000+ just 2 years ago on Ryzen 3900 and should I now bin everything and spend 4000 on something a bit more faster?
    No just wait a bit longer, i suspect with all competitors with products out , AMD will be forced to lower prices , plus as always any hardware that is new and just released is always costier. A bit of a wait i would imagine by November /December prices will be down.
    Reply
  • ottonis
    Seems like a great time to build a brand new Ryzen 5000 based system.
    A 12 core, 24 thread 5900x costs as little as 350 USD and is plenty of future proof for the next 5+ years. Pair this with plenty of cheap DDR4-RAM, and a B-series Mainboard, and you gonna get a very future proof system at half the price (and probably less power consumption) than a new DDR5-equipped Ryzen 7000 system.
    Reply
  • TCA_ChinChin
    If prices are any thing like what they are here when they are finally released I will be quite disappointed. An almost 50% increase in price, what a joke. I was optimistic about Zen 4 but if prices are anything like these leaks, then the price vs performance compared to current gen won't be worth it at all.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    The pricing comes from PC Canada, and hardware is more expensive outside the U.S. market. There's also a possibility that the listings are placeholders, so treat the pricing with a bit of salt. Compared to MSRP, these prices are reasonable, netting around a 10% to 12% price hike compared to Ryzen 5000 when it first launched. But, these prices are much more drastic now that Ryzen 5000 has been out for a few years and highly discounted in recent months.

    Considering this is the only online store offering Ryzen 7000 pre-orders, and AMD isn't even set to announce the CPUs for a couple weeks, this is most likely just placeholder pricing. They likely don't know the pricing, and obviously don't want to sell pre-orders at a price that ends up being lower than MSRP, so they pick the highest possible price they could potentially see the processors launching for.

    And no, these prices do not seem reasonable, unless AMD somehow manages to outperform Alder Lake by a wide enough margin that they even stay well ahead of Raptor Lake. Or if they were to increase core counts at each price level, making the 7600X an 8-core part, the 7700X a 12-core, and so on. Otherwise, even if they manage to outperform Intel at some lightly-threaded workloads, it seems unlikely for them to be competitive at heavily multi-threaded tasks with a 6 core, 12 thread 7600X positioned against an 8 core, 16 thread + 4 E-core i7.

    Again though, this is probably just the store's guess at what the highest possible prices might be, so that they can offer pre-orders before their competitors without potentially taking a loss on them.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    It's always easier to start too high, than too low.

    If their launch pricing is too high, they can simply use discounting and eventually re-price downward.

    If they start too low, they'll have availability problems and it'll be scalpers making the big profits.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Drazen said:
    I spent 2000+ just 2 years ago on Ryzen 3900 and should I now bin everything and spend 4000 on something a bit more faster?
    What are your needs or pain points? And why would you "bin everything", when PCs are upgradable? If you're seriously asking for advice, then you really need to provide more information.

    I'd suggest upgrading the parts likely to have the greatest impact. Maybe a simple BIOS + CPU upgrade to a 5950X would be wise, given recent discounts. You could probably get a few $ for the 3900X on ebay, or maybe just hang onto it as a spare.

    Maybe take advantage of recent drops in GPU prices, or just wait until new ones launch.

    Or, if you have deep pockets, then sure... go for a big upgrade to a 7950X. You could probably still keep your case & PSU, if they can handle the additional power. Also your SSD and GPU, depending on your needs.
    Reply
  • KyaraM
    cryoburner said:
    Considering this is the only online store offering Ryzen 7000 pre-orders, and AMD isn't even set to announce the CPUs for a couple weeks, this is most likely just placeholder pricing. They likely don't know the pricing, and obviously don't want to sell pre-orders at a price that ends up being lower than MSRP, so they pick the highest possible price they could potentially see the processors launching for.

    And no, these prices do not seem reasonable, unless AMD somehow manages to outperform Alder Lake by a wide enough margin that they even stay well ahead of Raptor Lake. Or if they were to increase core counts at each price level, making the 7600X an 8-core part, the 7700X a 12-core, and so on. Otherwise, even if they manage to outperform Intel at some lightly-threaded workloads, it seems unlikely for them to be competitive at heavily multi-threaded tasks with a 6 core, 12 thread 7600X positioned against an 8 core, 16 thread + 4 E-core i7.

    Again though, this is probably just the store's guess at what the highest possible prices might be, so that they can offer pre-orders before their competitors without potentially taking a loss on them.
    Mmmh, I kinda have my doubts they will outperform Raptor Lake, honestly. It might be a wash between both, which would be preferable from a competition standpoint anyways. It also depends on how Intel sets prices. Judgment is still out for me, honestly.
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    As I mentioned in another thread, I just hope this is an early adopter tax and a week or so after launch it goes down.

    AMD can't beat Intel with these prices, period. Unless they outperform Intel in every segment, this pricing makes zero sense.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • ottonis
    KyaraM said:
    Mmmh, I kinda have my doubts they will outperform Raptor Lake, honestly. It might be a wash between both, which would be preferable from a competition standpoint anyways. It also depends on how Intel sets prices. Judgment is still out for me, honestly.

    From a perspective of technological advancement, close competition is always preferable. However, from the perspective of pricing it's better to have one competitor behind the other one, because this is the scenario that reliably provides lower prices (for the less performing product) - at least in the short term. If RL and Zen4 perform similarly, then both could and will demand high prices because there is no other competition in the x86 world. However, if RL loses significantly to Zen4 (or vice versa) the inferior product must compensate with lower prices.
    Reply