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AMD Says 5nm Ryzen 7000 to Launch This Quarter, High-End RDNA 3 GPUs This Year

Zen 4

(Image credit: AMD)

During the company's second-quarter 2022 earnings call, AMD CEO Lisa Su announced that the company's 5nm Ryzen 7000 processors, the first Zen 4 models to come to market, will arrive later this quarter. Su also announced that the company would launch its high-end RDNA 3 Navi 3X GPUs later this year and confirmed that its 5nm EPYC Genoa server chips are on track to ramp up this year.

AMD's results stand in stark contrast to Intel's recent earnings report. Intel reported that it had lost $500 million in the quarter — its first quarterly loss in decades — and announced that it had delayed the volume ramp for the Xeon Sapphire Rapids processors into next year, yet another devastating miss. Intel also announced that it is winding down its products based on Optane technology.

In contrast, AMD seems to be firing on all cylinders as it prepares to launch its Ryzen 7000 CPUs, RDNA 3 GPUs, and EPYC Genoa data center processors on schedule.

"Looking ahead, we're on track to launch our all-new 5nm Ryzen 7000 desktop processors and AM5 platforms later this quarter with leadership performance in gaming and content creation," Su said.

This means we could see AMD launch its Ryzen 7000 chips slightly ahead of its original prediction of a launch in the Fall. For the US, Fall begins on September 22 and ends on December 22, and an increasing number of reports indicate that Ryzen 7000 will purportedly launch on September 15. The chips certainly appear poised to compete with Intel's Raptor Lake, as evidenced by a Ryzen 7000 demo today

AMD's near-term sales outlook for its gaming GPUs is a bit cloudy, an understandable condition given the devastation in the crypto market and the resulting supply glut. But Su sees a silver lining, "While we expect the gaming graphics market to be down in the third quarter, we remain focused on executing our GPU roadmap, including launching our high-end RDNA 3 GPU later this year." This indicates the company is on-track with its GPU roadmap and will deliver Navi 3X on time.  

AMD's disclosures come during yet another incredible quarterly earnings report, with the company earning $6.6 billion, up 70% year-over-year, among many notable other accomplishments in the quarter. 

Paul Alcorn
Paul Alcorn

Paul Alcorn is the Deputy Managing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He writes news and reviews on CPUs, storage and enterprise hardware.

  • -Fran-
    I hope Pat has a very big rearview mirror, so all of AMD can appear right behing his tail, lol.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • ezst036
    Lisa Su is doing a great job over there!
    Reply
  • JamesJones44
    AMD's fiscal 3rd quarter started June 25th and runs through September 24th. It could technically launch this quarter and in fall if they launch on the 22nd, 23rd or 24th of September.

    My guess is the soft "launch" on the 15th with limited quantities, while general availability lands in fall. Which is a practice I hate, but companies do it with increasing frequency these days.
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    The heat spreader on that thing! No RGB for me, but raw formed metal ...

    Intel's marketers need to know they are behind too.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    Co BIY said:
    The heat spreader on that thing! No RGB for me, but raw formed metal ...

    Intel's marketers need to know they are behind too.
    Looks like a terrible design from a practical standpoint. How do you keep thermal past from squishing into the cutouts? Certainly can't use liquid metal on that.
    Reply
  • thisisaname
    <slow hand clap>

    Now gives us a date for release not some vague words.
    JamesJones44 said:
    AMD's fiscal 3rd quarter started June 25th and runs through September 24th. It could technically launch this quarter and in fall if they launch on the 22nd, 23rd or 24th of September.

    My guess is the soft "launch" on the 15th with limited quantities, while general availability lands in fall. Which is a practice I hate, but companies do it with increasing frequency these days.

    If it only at most 6 weeks away they should give a date.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    Great to see AMD keep up the heat on Intel and Nvidia. But I would prefer to see actual products and not announced now, and only see it in retail 2 or more months later. Like Rembrandt and products in the past including the infamous RDNA2 release, the products actually only turned up in reasonable volume many months later.
    Reply
  • alceryes
    spongiemaster said:
    How do you keep thermal past from squishing into the cutouts?
    Carefully.
    It is a poor design from a TIM standpoint.
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    spongiemaster said:
    Looks like a terrible design from a practical standpoint. How do you keep thermal past from squishing into the cutouts? Certainly can't use liquid metal on that.
    You can cover them with an easy to remove tape and then apply whatever you want in big quantities, or just get better at applying thermal paste/grease/metal, lol.

    I've been doing it for over 15 years and I don't have issues with overflow, to be honest. And the little that does, it always concentrates right at the top without dripping or going outside the IHS, so I think you're being overdramatic.

    I know many YT'ers say "squeeze as much as you want", but the people that cares about how to apply the paste (and doesn't have a bazillion liters/gallons of it) actually are careful with the application. There's a good article here in Toms from a few years back on paste that I like, because it applies reason and "common sense" to it.

    I'll try to find it and put it here.

    All of that being said though, I do agree it'll apply just an extra level of complexity for builders. Is it relevant enough? I don't believe so.

    EDIT: The articles!
    https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/thermal-paste-heat-sink-heat-spreader,3600.htmlhttps://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/thermal-paste-performance-benchmark,3616.html
    Regards.
    Reply
  • alceryes
    (Sidebar regard TIM)
    I always shake my head when I see videos of people pulling the CPU/GPU heatsink off after applying TIM to 'see how it spread' and then just putting it back on. NEVER do this! Once you paste (very thin layer buttered toast method) and apply the heatsink you're done.
    Reply