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FSR 2.0 Is Coming To Xbox Series X/S and Xbox One, Already In Testing

Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S
(Image credit: Xbox)

In a new Tweet by the GPUOpen team and Xbox's Jason Ronald, AMD's Fidelity FX Super Resolution 2 is dropping its PC exclusivity and is making its way to Xbox consoles soon. Xbox development teams have already received the upscaler and are actively testing it right now for future deployment in games. Xbox consoles receiving FSR 2.0 support include the Xbox Series X and S, as well as the previous-gen Xbox One console.

Besides the Steam Deck, FSR 2.0 integration with Xbox marks the first time AMD's new temporal upscaling will be used outside of the PC ecosystem. Time will tell how prominent FSR will become in Xbox games, but there is huge potential for version 2.0 of the tech to be a big hit on Microsoft's gaming console.

Resolution upscalers are incredibly common to see on consoles such as the Xbox. Due to the incredibly long lifespan some of these consoles have, upscaling is almost a necessity for ensuring the console's GPU does not become obsolete within a few years. Almost all Xbox (and PlayStation) games have some form of upscaling whether that be a competing temporal solution (that isn't FSR) or checkerboarding in order to hit a target frame rate of 30, 60 or even 120 fps on current-gen consoles at higher resolutions.

We can't say how much better FSR 2.0 will look on consoles, but presumably its temporal algorithm to be at least on par with competing for temporal solutions already on the latest Xbox games, and almost certainly better than checkerboarding with its more simplistic upscaling algorithm.

But, the biggest hurdle will be in developer integration of FSR 2.0 which could be quite probablematic for many titles. FSR 2.0 more advanced temporal solution requires additional data, that might not already be included in the game engine, including depth buffers, motion vectors, and color buffers. This additional data can take much longer to implement than FSR 2.0 itself, which will extend the development time of FSR 2.0 implementation. 

The only exception to this will be games that already include a temporal upscaling solution, meaning these additional data points will already be available in the game engine. All the developers need to do is add the FSR 2.0 source code to the engine.

Perhaps the most surprising announcement from the tweets is FSR 2.0 integration with Xbox One and its much older hardware compared to the Series X and S. On the PC side of things, FSR 2.0 already has a quite rigorous minimum GPU requirement at 4K with an RX 5700 and RTX 2070, and a GTX 1080 and RX 6500 XT for 1440P, making us wonder if the Xbox One's GPU can handle such a compute-heavy upscaler.

It will be interesting to see how performance shapes up with FSR 2.0, but if Microsoft has greenlit support for the Xbox One, it must believe this older console can handle FSR 2.0's heavy computing requirements without a problem. We fully expect Series X and S to benefit greatly from FSR 2.0 though, with GPUs powered on the same RDNA2 architecture as the RX 6000 series desktop GPUs from AMD.

Aaron Klotz
Aaron Klotz

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • sycoreaper
    I think it will be successful, older Xbox's will be able to play newer games without looking like poo and newer Xbox's can be pushed harder.

    I think the extra computing cost though minimal, will have Xbox outperform the PS5 for FSR titles. I don't say that as a fanboy, it's just a fact that while the hardware is nearly identical, the Series-X has a bit extra horsepower as overhead for FSR.
    Reply
  • Sleepy_Hollowed
    Now this is impressive, and if it gets optimizations for resource-limited systems such as the Xbox One, that will make it better all around.

    If this is pulled off properly, that's an edge for the Xbox in graphics at least.
    Reply
  • saunupe1911
    I bet the next Forza will use this to achieve beautiful 4k 120hz
    Reply
  • theboeingman
    sycoreaper said:
    I think it will be successful, older Xbox's will be able to play newer games without looking like poo and newer Xbox's can be pushed harder.

    I think the extra computing cost though minimal, will have Xbox outperform the PS5 for FSR titles. I don't say that as a fanboy, it's just a fact that while the hardware is nearly identical, the Series-X has a bit extra horsepower as overhead for FSR.
    I have both X and PS5, and agree wholeheartedly!
    Reply
  • Damn_Smooth
    Forspoken PS5 was confirmed by the developers to use FSR 2.0 long ago. Xbox isn't first at anything. Nice advertisement though.
    Reply
  • danhido
    Damn_Smooth said:
    Forspoken PS5 was confirmed by the developers to use FSR 2.0 long ago. Xbox isn't first at anything. Nice advertisement though.

    Full disclaimer, I have a Series X and a PS5. I throughly enjoy both systems, Sony IME is very slow to roll out features.

    Having started with a PS5 (as my first current gen system)and going through the slog of re-downloading every PS4 game that had an upgraded PS5 version and going through the inconsistent (sometimes non-existent) transfer of save files; smart delivery was a breath of fresh air, a patch on the game that had been transferred over from my old Xbox and I was ready to play the next-gen upgraded version of the game (save files were seamless).

    Regarding your statement "Xbox isn't first at anything"; facts would dictate otherwise:

    Xbox One X (2017):
    Object based audio (PS5 2020)
    ALLM (PS5 2022)
    VRR (PS5 2022)
    120Hz (PS5 2020)
    Dolby Vision HDR (not planned/never)Xbox Series X/S (2020):
    Ability to add additional storage for next-gen games (PS5 2021)
    Smart delivery of next-gen games (never?)
    Reply
  • Damn_Smooth
    danhido said:
    Full disclaimer, I have a Series X and a PS5. I throughly enjoy both systems, Sony IME is very slow to roll out features.

    Having started with a PS5 (as my first current gen system)and going through the slog of re-downloading every PS4 game that had an upgraded PS5 version and going through the inconsistent (sometimes non-existent) transfer of save files; smart delivery was a breath of fresh air, a patch on the game that had been transferred over from my old Xbox and I was ready to play the next-gen upgraded version of the game (save files were seamless).

    Regarding your statement "Xbox isn't first at anything"; facts would dictate otherwise:

    Xbox One X (2017):
    Object based audio (PS5 2020)
    ALLM (PS5 2022)
    VRR (PS5 2022)
    120Hz (PS5 2020)
    Dolby Vision HDR (not planned/never)Xbox Series X/S (2020):
    Ability to add additional storage for next-gen games (PS5 2021)
    Smart delivery of next-gen games (never?)
    It was in regards to this article only that "Xbox isn't first at anything", not that Xbox has never been first at anything. Not sure how you took that literally.
    Reply
  • sycoreaper
    Damn_Smooth said:
    It was in regards to this article only that "Xbox isn't first at anything", not that Xbox has never been first at anything. Not sure how you took that literally.


    Easy dudeski, this is a place for discussion. Its not the reddit cesspool.
    Reply