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Apple Tablet Aiming to "Redefine Print"

We know quite a bit about Apple's tablet – that is, quite a bit seeing as how the company hasn't even said they're going to release one. We know how much it's going to cost (between $800 and $1,000) and we know when it's going to hit the market (very early 2010, possibly February but with shipments arriving at Apple in December '09). We also know who's providing the displays (Wintek), and we know who's got the contract for batteries (apparently DynaPack is supplying 300,000 long lasting battery packs a month for the device). Add to that a processor from Apple's own P.A. Semi and HSPDA and you get a pretty rounded out picture of what Apple is going to come up with.

However, what we don't know, is who Apple is going to target with the device. Is it really going to be one giant iPod Touch or is it going to be more of a netbook? Then again, could it be Apple's answer to the Kindle? Well, if this week's rumors are to be believed then Apple's tablet is going to redefine print.

According to Gizmodo's Brian Lam, Apple is currently in talks with several media companies rooted in print. According to Lam, these negotiations revolve around, "content for a 'new device.' And they're not just going for e-books and mags. They're aiming to redefine print."

Giz goes on to cite sources from the New York Times who say the company is in talks with Apple, and says the company is also talking to McGraw Hill and Oberlin Press who are working with Apple to move textbooks to iTunes.

Sounds a lot like the Kindle DX to us, what with newspapers and textbook publishers jumping on board. Check out the full story here.

  • at that price point and for its rumored purpose i foresee extremely limited adoption.
    Reply
  • hellwig
    @njkid: you lack vision. This is apple here. They could slap their logo on a brick, charge $500, and sell millions to idiots who buy anything labeled as Apple, regardless of what it does or how well it does it. Then they find out the brick's battery can't be replaced, and complain on the forums. Apple deletes the forum entries with the complaints, and the people who complained forget there was ever a problem, and line up to buy to new iBrick 2.0, which is the same as the first iBrick, but only costs $400 this time.
    Reply
  • hellwig@njkid: you lack vision. This is apple here. They could slap their logo on a brick, charge $500, and sell millions to idiots who buy anything labeled as Apple, regardless of what it does or how well it does it. Then they find out the brick's battery can't be replaced, and complain on the forums. Apple deletes the forum entries with the complaints, and the people who complained forget there was ever a problem, and line up to buy to new iBrick 2.0, which is the same as the first iBrick, but only costs $400 this time.
    i understand where you are coming from but my comment was meant for limited adoption with people with a brain and not by mindless drones.
    Reply
  • ravewulf
    Why does it always sound like they are "redefining" everything when what they end up with isn't actually that special
    Reply
  • tapnick
    I think that's a little skewed. Eveything has it's problems, but some companies have a different idea of innovation. I doubt they are just throwing around the idea of a kindle like device but rather a tablet like device with an integrated ereader. I think you need to stop coining consumers as idiots.
    Reply
  • erikstarcher
    $800-1000? Nothing more than a Kindle DX with an Apple tax?
    Reply
  • seboj
    hellwig@njkid: you lack vision. This is apple here. They could slap their logo on a brick, charge $500, and sell millions to idiots who buy anything labeled as Apple, regardless of what it does or how well it does it. Then they find out the brick's battery can't be replaced, and complain on the forums. Apple deletes the forum entries with the complaints, and the people who complained forget there was ever a problem, and line up to buy to new iBrick 2.0, which is the same as the first iBrick, but only costs $400 this time.
    Hellwig's comment is so awesome it deserves to be repeated.
    Reply
  • beehew
    NegativeX4 years too late Apple.With the Samsung Q1, Motion LS800 and subsequent clones, there's not much left except a few scrap pieces for Apple too mop up. Should of re-released the Newton years ago aye?The only thing Apple with be redefining, is your pocket book and their subsequent Apple tax.No, Apple fanatics will find a way to explain how all of these precursors actually copied Apple's product. Just wait...
    Reply
  • mr_tuel
    Here:s how I foresee the Apple tablet:

    Looks sorta like s large iPod touch, centered heavily on entertainment (don't forget games!). It will be the perfect size for ebooks, and even a good size for etextbooks (esp with color scree). The Kindle etexbook experiment has flopped for many reasons, but I bet if you put etextbooks on a large ipod-esque tablet computer you'll have a winner. All that stuff into something as thick as one of the early-generation iPod classics (10GB?) weighing a half pound or so.
    Reply
  • matt87_50
    heh, didn't anyone tell you? "mindless drones" are like 95% of the market!
    Reply