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Three New 'Super Stock' Maingear PCs Utilize Intel's X99 Chipset

PC builder Maingear has claimed the "world's first" by launching a special lineup of small form factor gaming desktops that utilize the Intel X99 chipset. These include "Super Stock" editions of the Potenza, the Drift and the Torq, which are based on the ASRock X99E-ITX/ac motherboard and support processors up to the eight-core i7-5960X Intel chip.

Shopping for a console-sized desktop? Look no further than the Drift. With a $2,399 starting price, this compact desktop's base specifications include an Intel Core i7-5820K six-core processor (3.3 GHz/3.6 GHz), an Nvidia GeForce GTX 970 GPU with 4 GB of GDDR5 VRAM, and 8 GB of Corsair Vengeance DDR4-2666 RAM. Also thrown into the mix is a 500 GB Seagate Barracuda hard drive, a 250 GB Samsung 850 EVO SSD and Maingear's EPIC 120 CPU "Supercooler."

Although the Drift isn't a Steam Machine by name, the desktop is Steam-ready. Customers who want a bit more beef on the configuration plate can opt for Intel's eight-core i7-5960X processor (3.0 GHz/3.5 GHz) for $854. Customers can also choose to max out the memory at 16 GB and choose from a variety of GPU cards from Nvidia and AMD. The most expensive GPU on the list is the Nvidia GeForce Titan X with 12 GB of GDDR5 VRAM, costing a hefty $902 on top of the base price.

Next we have Maingear's Torq, which is a bit "boxier" than the other two but looks sexy in any environment. The base specifications include an Intel Core i7-5820K six-core processor (3.3 GHz/3.6 GHz), an AMD Radeon R9 290 with 4 GB of DDR4-2666 VRAM, and 8 GB of Corsair Vengeance DDR4-2666 RAM. This model has a single Seagate Barracuda 7200 RPM hard drive with 1 TB of storage, Swiftech's Apogee Drive II CPU block/pump combo and a starting price of $2,999.

As for customization, the Torq can be upgraded with the Intel Core i7-5960X eight-core processor (3.3 GHz/3.6 Ghz), 16 GB of Corsair Vengeance DDR4-2666 dual-channel memory, and the Nvidia GeForce Titan X with 12 GB of GDDR5 VRAM. The menu also shows an 860-watt Corsair Professional Digital Series 80+ power supply, additional storage options for bay 2 and bay 3, and a choice of Windows 8.1 64-bit, Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit or Windows 7 Professional 64-bit operating system.

Finally, we have the Potenza, which has a starting price of $1,899. This gaming desktop's base list of hardware includes an Intel Core i7-5820K six-core processor (3.3 GHz/3.6 GHz), an Nvidia GeForce GTX 960 graphics card with 2 GB of GDDR5 VRAM, and 8 GB of Corsair Vengeance DDR4-2666 memory. There's also 1 TB of storage provided by a Seagate Barracuda 7200 RPM hard drive and Maingear's EPIC 120 Supercooler that keeps the processor chilled.

The Potenza can be upgraded to the Intel Core i7-5960X eight-core processor (3.0 GHz/3.5 GHz). Additional choices include 16 GB of RAM, a handful of graphics options such as Nvidia's GeForce Titan X GPU card with 12 GB of GDDR5 VRAM, and a 600-watt Silverstone sx600g 80+ gold certified power supply. Customers can opt to have storage solutions in all three bays, a 6x Blu-ray burner, dual-band wireless by Amped Wireless and more.

"Our selection of compact gaming beasts with the X99 and extreme edition processors are roadsters with the power and performance of V8 engines," stated Wallace Santos, CEO and Founder of Maingear.

All in all, there's plenty of meat backing these three small form factor gaming PCs even before customization. Naturally, we like to build our own gaming rigs, but customers looking to take the shortcut have plenty here to choose from with this small form factor lineup. To configure and purchase one of these Super Stock edition gaming desktops, head here.

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  • Larry Litmanen
    I tried using PC as a console, it's not the same. Games are not optimized for the controller as smoothly as they are on the console. Also i am having constant issues with XboxOne controller and PC. Tried playing Lego Batman 3 and they game does not know how to recognize if i want to play alone or in 2 player mode. And you have to start a new game if you want to play in a different mode.

    PC is not as optimized for the controller as a console is ( this is where you say duhhhhhhh)
    Reply
  • stoned_ritual
    I tried using PC as a console, it's not the same. Games are not optimized for the controller as smoothly as they are on the console. Also i am having constant issues with XboxOne controller and PC. Tried playing Lego Batman 3 and they game does not know how to recognize if i want to play alone or in 2 player mode. And you have to start a new game if you want to play in a different mode.

    PC is not as optimized for the controller as a console is ( this is where you say duhhhhhhh)

    Windows loves the xbox 360 controller. Use one of those. The XBONE controller literally JUST got drivers for windows. I play almost exclusively on my 2 xbox controllers, unless i'm playing a twitch shooter. I can't really read this comment without going "WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT"

    Reply
  • stoned_ritual
    On point with the article, I like all the silver stone cases that maingear carves their logo into, but an asrock x99 itx board sounds like trouble to me. I have no brand loyalty, but I've not had a single good experience with anything asrock.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    Looks nice for a pre built. Pretty cool that you can actually have a octo core 5960X in mini itx now.

    While those systems are nice, a homebuilt system with same specs is cheaper.
    Reply
  • Steakhaus
    "Intel Core i7-5820K six-core processor (3.3 GHz/3.6 GHz), an Nvidia GeForce GTX 960 graphics card with 2 GB of GDDR5 VRAM"

    Wouldn't a 960 with 2 GB be an extreme bottleneck for a six core i7 processor?
    Reply
  • fonzy
    Just curious but the picture of the blue case in the middle isn't that a Corsair 250D?
    Reply
  • atheus
    15653234 said:
    "Intel Core i7-5820K six-core processor (3.3 GHz/3.6 GHz), an Nvidia GeForce GTX 960 graphics card with 2 GB of GDDR5 VRAM"

    Wouldn't a 960 with 2 GB be an extreme bottleneck for a six core i7 processor?
    As far as I can tell, none of these builds make any sense, but yes, especially so with that Potenza. Any builder who suggests a $1900 gaming computer that's running the OS on a 1TB HDD, 8 GB of ram, and a GTX 960 should have their builder's license revoked imho. Put that $1900 into a Z97 system and you'll basically double every benchmark of that ill-conceived Potenza. Seems Toms has news about this absurd ASRock motherboard every few days recently. I get that it's interesting in a "shoe phone" sort of way, but I can only hope this is the last story about this silly side-show.
    Reply
  • wiyosaya
    On point with the article, I like all the silver stone cases that maingear carves their logo into, but an asrock x99 itx board sounds like trouble to me. I have no brand loyalty, but I've not had a single good experience with anything asrock.
    I can't say anything about this asrock board, but I have had great luck with several asrock mbs that I currently run, one of which is an x79.
    Reply