AMD, BlueStacks Team Up for Android Apps on x86

Thursday AMD said that it has teamed up with BlueStacks to help bring Android applications to Windows-based devices. The chip maker will lend a hand in optimizing the BlueStacks App Player for Windows so that the more than 200,000 apps currently available in the Android Market will perform at their peak when running on APUs powered with AMD VISION technology.

"BlueStacks is a visionary software company that is, seamlessly, making the emerging Android mobile apps market part of the broader computing ecosystem and enhancing such experiences on our award-winning APU platforms," said Manju Hegde, corporate vice president, AMD Fusion Experience Program. "AMD is committed to support such game changing innovators through investment and other activity as we work together to usher in new experiences that allow consumers to enjoy the full capabilities of the brilliant graphics and computing performance enabled by AMD."

As reported last week, BlueStacks launched an alpha version of its App Player that allows Windows 7-based PCs and tablets to run Android apps within the Windows environment without having to install the Android SDK or modify the original software. The App Player also allows PCs and tablets to install apps synced from an Android device thanks to the company's Android-based Cloud Connect technology.

The current alpha version of BlueStacks' App Player comes packed with free Android apps including Words Free, Aporkalypse, Talking Tom 2 Free, Bubble Buster and seven others. Users can also download an additional 31 free apps from the BlueStacks website, but given that the software is still in alpha, users will discover some problems running the apps. For example, Talking Tom doesn't actually talk, but spurts out a garbled electronic mess instead.

Support for premium apps like Angry Birds and Fruit Ninja is still in the works, BlueStacks said.

Create a new thread in the US News comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
17 comments
Comment from the forums
    Your comment
    Top Comments
  • amk-aka-Phantom
    For hell's sake... why would anyone need those "apps" on a full desktop OS?! That's exactly what I hate about Windows 8 - for some reason, everyone tends to think you need a ton of crApps to get any work done, while in fact all you need is an Internet browser.
    11
  • Other Comments
  • amk-aka-Phantom
    For hell's sake... why would anyone need those "apps" on a full desktop OS?! That's exactly what I hate about Windows 8 - for some reason, everyone tends to think you need a ton of crApps to get any work done, while in fact all you need is an Internet browser.
    11
  • ravewulf
    amk-aka-phantomFor hell's sake... why would anyone need those "apps" on a full desktop OS?! That's exactly what I hate about Windows 8 - for some reason, everyone tends to think you need a ton of crApps to get any work done, while in fact all you need is an Internet browser.

    Using HTML based apps also largely solves platform compatibility. The only compatibility issue is what the various browsers support. No need for recompiling or emulating.
    2
  • falchard
    Anonymous said:
    For hell's sake... why would anyone need those "apps" on a full desktop OS?! That's exactly what I hate about Windows 8 - for some reason, everyone tends to think you need a ton of crApps to get any work done, while in fact all you need is an Internet browser.


    Because they might be using an Intel IGP. Not sure why AMD would want to bring this forward considering all their IGPs are capable of much more.
    1