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Google ''Not Ready'' to Release Honeycomb Code

By - Source: BusinessWeek | B 27 comments

Google has said it’s not ready to release the source code for its tablet-optimized version of Android, Honeycomb.

Google's Android OS is open by nature. The company puts the source code out there and allows third parties to use it in whatever devices tickle their fancy. However, despite the openness of Android, Google is holding off on sharing the source code for the latest iteration of Android, Android 3.0, because it feels Honeycomb is not yet ready to be altered and customized for different devices.

According to BusinessWeek, the delay in distribution is ‘for the forseeable future,’ and Android Chief Andy Rubin refused to give a time frame of when we can expect the source code to be made public. Rubin says the Android team is working hard to make Honeycomb work on devices other than tablets and explained that this was something that was sacrificed in the rush to get Honeycomb ready on time.

"To make our schedule to ship the tablet, we made some design tradeoffs," says Andy Rubin, "We didn't want to think about what it would take for the same software to run on phones. It would have required a lot of additional resources and extended our schedule beyond what we thought was reasonable. So we took a shortcut."

Rubin goes on to say that releasing the code now would mean developers would put it on phones and the end result would be a really bad user experience.” “We have no idea if it will even work on phones," BusinessWeek cites Rubin as saying.

Fingers crossed they release it soon. Google often makes the source code available to device manufacturers a little bit earlier, so HTC, Motorola, and a few others already have access to it, but we can't wait to see what wild world of Android developers will do with it. Fingers crossed Google releases it soon so smaller companies and developers can really take a crack at it.

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  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , March 26, 2011 6:16 PM
    sabot00 FFS really!
  • -1 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , March 26, 2011 6:16 PM
    sabot00But can it play Crysis?

    uber fail.

    Anyway, I bet that they're waiting until Honeycomb reaches the mobile market, which according to wikipedia, will be this summer. That is, Q3 2011.
  • 3 Hide
    Anonymous , March 26, 2011 6:28 PM
    @sabot00

    :facepalm:
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , March 26, 2011 8:17 PM
    They're just trying to get Honeycomb worked back into Android instead of releasing a separate tablet specific OS which would cause more confusion.

    Not a big deal despite what some would like us to believe.
  • 2 Hide
    RodolfoKSP , March 26, 2011 10:09 PM
    “We have no idea if it will even work on phones," yes you have, on the HTC HD2
  • -1 Hide
    jhansonxi , March 26, 2011 10:15 PM
    sabot00But can it play Crysis?

    If it supports Wine then it can (if the hardware is fast enough).
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , March 26, 2011 10:33 PM
    Android isn't as free(libre) and open as Linux was meant to be, but OTOH, it's a helluva lot more free and open than Windows or OSX ever will be. So, credit where credit is due, Google is a much better company than MS or Apple.
  • 0 Hide
    scrumworks , March 27, 2011 6:37 AM
    This is open source by Google.
  • 0 Hide
    nebun , March 27, 2011 7:13 AM
    google is becoming greedy :(  so sad
  • 0 Hide
    scuba dave , March 27, 2011 7:31 AM
    nacho_libreAndroid isn't as free(libre) and open as Linux was meant to be, but OTOH, it's a helluva lot more free and open than Windows or OSX ever will be. So, credit where credit is due, Google is a much better company than MS or Apple.


    What world do you live in where the defining characteristic of a "much better company" is based on whether something is "free and open", or, at least in Google's case "free and pseudo-open"?

    Such a ridiculous statement. The only thing they can possibly be given, in regards to "credit", is that they made a product that some people will like, and that they managed to whip up a media-frenzy, and that even more people will swallow the hogwash that is Google's claim that Android, and Honeycomb, are "Open Source".

    That is all.
  • 1 Hide
    Vladislaus , March 27, 2011 11:46 AM
    scuba daveThe only thing they can possibly be given, in regards to "credit", is that they made a product that some people will like, and that they managed to whip up a media-frenzy, and that even more people will swallow the hogwash that is Google's claim that Android, and Honeycomb, are "Open Source". That is all.

    So Android is not open source?
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , March 27, 2011 1:32 PM
    scuba_dave: the importance of companies like Google that support open source is:

    1. GPL/LGPL/Apache/Public Domain licenses: If some evil dick-headed company like Oracle buys google, the community has a right to fork the current source code and create their own version, free of the stupidity being imposed by the owner du jour. This happened to Open Office after Oracle bought Sun, now we have a fork called LibreOffice.

    2. The ability to compile your own sources: Google gets a bad rap for privacy, and admittedly, they do collect an awful lot of your personal information, but they always give you the ability to opt-out or not use their service. MS collects as much or more information, and their "proprietary-or-GTFO" business model only serves to cultivate such shady backdoor dealings as NSAKEY, which you cannot opt out of. Atleast if I distrust the Android binaries, I can review them and compile my own.


    Hopefully, Ubuntu for ARM will eventually contain the necessary telephony stack to be a smartphone OS that's more in the spirit of FOSS that Android. In the mean time, Android is a far better choice than iOS or WP7, for those who aren't complete tech-illiterate lemmings.
  • 2 Hide
    boltimuss , March 27, 2011 7:04 PM
    "...The only thing they can possibly be given, in regards to "credit", is that they made a product that some people will like, and that they managed to whip up a media-frenzy ..."

    Isn't that what Apple has done?
  • 1 Hide
    cookoy , March 27, 2011 10:36 PM
    just wondering, do HTC, Motorola, Samsung etc who use the Google source codes, also make their modified source codes available to the public?
  • 0 Hide
    herpity , March 27, 2011 10:52 PM
    ^ No idea why you would want them...
  • 0 Hide
    seboj , March 28, 2011 2:10 AM
    @cyanogen "I think Google is doing the right thing by not releasing 3.0 source, because it's probably a pile of nasty hacks."

    Cyanogen (of CyanogenMod fame) sums it up pretty well.
  • 0 Hide
    rebturtle , March 28, 2011 5:25 AM
    That's a lot of crossed fingers
  • -1 Hide
    sudeshc , March 28, 2011 5:30 AM
    GOOGLE is holding it up just to earn................
    or may be its developers are so dumb that they dont know what they developed.
  • 0 Hide
    sudeshc , March 28, 2011 5:31 AM
    ohh no is Google going the same path Apple choose years back....
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