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Chrome OS Notebooks Will Be Windows-proof

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 64 comments

Don't look at one of these if you're into Windows.

The Chrome OS Notebook appears to be a rather basic system that's almost the perfect definition of a netbook. Like the early netbooks, the Cr-48 runs a non-Windows operating system and its primary purpose is to run a browser.

While Chrome OS aims to make things quite a bit more user-friendly compared to the early day 7-inch netbooks, there is always going to be the case where a user will ask where the start button is to find solitaire.

So will Chrome OS notebooks also have the option to dual-boot another operating system like Windows? Google says no, as "certified" Chrome OS notebooks will only be able to run the single operating system

Part of that may be due to Chrome OS's use of protected flash memory, which is great for security, but isn't so great for custom installs and for spaciousness.

Another detail Engadget picked up is that Google will be providing live customer support for its initial line of Cr-48 notebooks, even though they aren't commercial items. Google doesn't expect there to be many support issues, however, as it feels that the OS is simple enough for most users.

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  • 54 Hide
    scook9 , December 9, 2010 1:09 PM
    amk09Yes, then a whole slew of "OMG Y IZ MY CHROME NETBOOK SO SLOW WIT WINDOWZ???"Erm, cuz its not designed for it.

    Actually they WONT be saying that, no caps lock key haha
  • 29 Hide
    TomsSound , December 9, 2010 12:53 PM
    It's only a matter of time before someone puts windows on there... just to say they did it first. Then.... whole slew of how-to sites.
  • 11 Hide
    Anonymous , December 9, 2010 1:35 PM
    Sadly, Not supporting a separate OS install seems too much like Apple for my taste. I love Google's products but I can't say I like this move. Even if it is not completely optimized for windows, once I buy a piece of hardware, I like the flexibility to do whatever I want with it (within reason).
Other Comments
  • 29 Hide
    TomsSound , December 9, 2010 12:53 PM
    It's only a matter of time before someone puts windows on there... just to say they did it first. Then.... whole slew of how-to sites.
  • 4 Hide
    amk09 , December 9, 2010 1:04 PM
    tomssoundIt's only a matter of time before someone puts windows on there... just to say they did it first. Then.... whole slew of how-to sites.


    Yes, then a whole slew of "OMG Y IZ MY CHROME NETBOOK SO SLOW WIT WINDOWZ???"

    Erm, cuz its not designed for it.
  • 54 Hide
    scook9 , December 9, 2010 1:09 PM
    amk09Yes, then a whole slew of "OMG Y IZ MY CHROME NETBOOK SO SLOW WIT WINDOWZ???"Erm, cuz its not designed for it.

    Actually they WONT be saying that, no caps lock key haha
  • 2 Hide
    utengineer , December 9, 2010 1:13 PM
    Excellent tool for field teams in a commerical environment. They can boot to browser in less than 20 sec and go. For those just browsing, email, and standard office docs.....this is a winner. Windows has so much overhead.
  • 1 Hide
    randomstar , December 9, 2010 1:18 PM
    Is it just me or does that look like to old Dell inspiron b 1400?
    still have one for basic browsing for use by guests at the house..
  • 10 Hide
    gogogadgetliver , December 9, 2010 1:28 PM
    "Google doesn't expect there to be many support issues, however, as it feels that the OS is simple enough for most users."

    Google doesn't get it on support. Nexus users complain about it. Google Docs and Google Apps users complain so much they eventually pack up and go to Microsoft BPOS (Office365).

    The fact that they are releasing a 1.0 operating system and expecting few support issues is laughable.
  • -1 Hide
    r3t4rd , December 9, 2010 1:34 PM
    scook9Actually they WONT be saying that, no caps lock key haha

    LULZ!!

    randomstarIs it just me or does that look like to old Dell inspiron b 1400?still have one for basic browsing for use by guests at the house..

    Beacuse that "IS" what you are looking at. The Dell 1400 is a Pentium II? III? The power on the Google Netbook cannot be more than that! BTW, I have two of those Dell 1400's and a Compaq Armada as dead paperweight.
  • 11 Hide
    Anonymous , December 9, 2010 1:35 PM
    Sadly, Not supporting a separate OS install seems too much like Apple for my taste. I love Google's products but I can't say I like this move. Even if it is not completely optimized for windows, once I buy a piece of hardware, I like the flexibility to do whatever I want with it (within reason).
  • 9 Hide
    cryogenic , December 9, 2010 1:39 PM
    Quote:
    Google doesn't expect there to be many support issues, however, as it feels that the OS is simple enough for most users


    That never quite works in practice, no matter how much Google want's it to work.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , December 9, 2010 2:13 PM
    @DB-Hey, this Cr48 isn't targeted at consumers. It's a giveaway for developers that are pledging to develop apps for it.
  • 2 Hide
    SneakySnake , December 9, 2010 2:25 PM
    I thought google was open? Even apple doesn't block out other OS'es
  • -1 Hide
    HalJordan , December 9, 2010 2:28 PM
    DB-Hey Even if it is not completely optimized for windows, once I buy a piece of hardware, I like the flexibility to do whatever I want with it (within reason).


    When you buy a toaster do you wonder if you can upgrade the heating mechanism? When you buy a new telephone do you wonder if you can mod it to play Crysis? Maybe we should just look at this little netbook as a tool; it does what it does, and to expect anymore is like wanting a hammer that can function as a screwdriver. Sure you could design a hammer with a screw driver on the end of the handle, but would anyone really want to use it?
  • -1 Hide
    amdwilliam1985 , December 9, 2010 2:43 PM
    Chrome OS is perfect for those HTPC that are mainly using hulu and netflix.
    I will definitely try the OS in my media pc when it's available.
  • 0 Hide
    coldmast , December 9, 2010 2:47 PM
    So is it installed on a solid state like an instant-on OS?
  • 3 Hide
    Anomalyx , December 9, 2010 3:07 PM
    SneakySnakeI thought google was open? Even apple doesn't block out other OS'es

    Openness doesn't include the requirement of using more expensive hardware so that less efficient OS's have enough processing power to run. They picked hardware that would run Chrome OS. Minimum/recommended requirements for it are probably waaaaaaaaay below the minimum requirements for Windows. The fact that they didn't include a 160GB hard drive when all they need is a tiny flash chip says nothing about openness... it's about cost-effectiveness. Equipping this with hardware necessary for Windows would make it little different than a standard netbook. The way it is now, it could probably be much cheaper.
  • 2 Hide
    razor512 , December 9, 2010 3:23 PM
    When you limit a system in functionality, basically selling a netbook but with less functionality than a netbook, then you will lose sales.

    Unless the chrome netbook is significantly cheaper than a netbook, (well below $299) no one with an IQ above 50 will buy it.

    cloud computing will never beat a full on OS in terms of reliability and functionality, and responsiveness for light tasks.

    For a $300 netbook with a 1.66GHz intel atom, it is easy to dualboot windows xp, ubuntu and even the mac os if you are ok with the lengthy install process.

    So far, the chrome netbook seems to offer far fewer features than even a smartphone.

    Their site talks about slow bootup times.

    my core 2 based laptop boots windows xp in about 17 seconds to a completely usable state where there is no additional loading. If I was to upgrade from the 5400RPM drive to a 7200RPM drive,it would load even faster.

    Chrome netbooks are so far useless. while web browsing and web apps can be good, people want more than that. would you buy a iphone if the only features it offered was a web browser and a phone feature and 100% nothing else (other than the option to use web apps?

  • -1 Hide
    pinkfloydminnesota , December 9, 2010 3:47 PM
    Yes. Which would be why Google is sending these so developers can make software to make it useful!

    Hello? Missing the point, anyone?
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , December 9, 2010 3:55 PM
    Lack of a Caps Lock key can be easily fixed!

    Just place a small, yet just heavy enough weight on the Shift Key and Voila! You've got your Caps Lock! :lol: 

    Or you could just use an adjustable clamp on the edge of the keyboard or laptop to hold the Shift key down. :p 
  • 1 Hide
    azcoyote , December 9, 2010 3:56 PM
    MAKE IT $200 AND YOU HAVE THE EDU-PC MARKET
    (caps locks for Google sake)
  • 2 Hide
    thebigt42 , December 9, 2010 4:00 PM
    utengineerExcellent tool for field teams in a commerical environment. They can boot to browser in less than 20 sec and go. For those just browsing, email, and standard office docs.....this is a winner. Windows has so much overhead.

    But does it run Citrix
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