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Microsoft Starting to Plan for Office 15

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 18 comments
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It's the thing to do these days in order to stay ahead.

Microsoft has already started planning for Office 15, which will be the version after Office 2010 (the fourteenth iteration of Office).

Such forward and advanced planning isn't uncommon. In fact, Microsoft is already at work on Windows 8, which it hopes to ship in 2012.

Ars Technica spotted a post on the Microsoft Access Team Blog titled, "Access 15 and SQL Server" with the following message: "Hello everyone! As Office 2010 nears shipping, we are starting to plan Office 15. One area that we are considering improving is our SQL Server support. Based on what I've heard from the community, that would be most welcome. Note that we are very early in planning, and considering many possible areas of investment, I unfortunately can't commit to any actual improvements at this time."

The final shipping name of the product likely won't be Office 15, as the previous versions 2003, 2007 and the upcoming 2010, are named after their release years. Of course, with no committed release frame yet, we'll be referring to it as Office 15 for some time to come.

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  • 5 Hide
    XD_dued , December 9, 2009 7:41 PM
    I enjoy Microsoft's new clever naming scheme of products...what's next...zune 3? :D 
  • 4 Hide
    darkknight22 , December 9, 2009 7:49 PM
    People are already struggling and delaying upgrading to office 2007, what could office 2010 have that I possibly need?
  • 3 Hide
    abhik , December 9, 2009 8:26 PM
    did you know that office 2007 was infact version twelve of the windows versions? Microsoft skipped version 13 and jumped to version 14 because they think 13 is an unlucky number. look it up if you dont believe me.
  • -1 Hide
    omnimodis78 , December 9, 2009 9:04 PM
    darkknight22People are already struggling and delaying upgrading to office 2007, what could office 2010 have that I possibly need?

    64 bit sound good to you? Much improved user interface? Try the beta and see if you like it, if not then you won't have to wonder, you'll know for sure! Cheers.
  • 4 Hide
    wesleywatson , December 9, 2009 9:25 PM
    64 bit? Christ, who needs 3GB of memory reserved for a word document they're typing up?
  • 0 Hide
    _SirO_ , December 9, 2009 9:47 PM
    You can complain about whatever you want, but the fact is that MS keeps pushing the envelope and does not stagnate.

    I wish I knew how to properly work with all their office apps, I just began working with OneNote, and I love it.
  • 2 Hide
    IzzyCraft , December 9, 2009 10:30 PM
    XD_duedI enjoy Microsoft's new clever naming scheme of products...what's next...zune 3?

    ?
    Microsoft has already started planning for Office 15, which will be the version after Office 2010 (the fourteenth iteration of Office).
    If you look into the install files windows 2010 is listed under office 14 in some cases this numbering is not an official name just pointing out that it's the 15th version to pop out so just

    wesleywatson64 bit? Christ, who needs 3GB of memory reserved for a word document they're typing up?

    Excell and access is more where 64bit is wanted. :D 
  • 0 Hide
    jacobdrj , December 9, 2009 10:41 PM
    2010 has OneNote x64. I need this for my tablet to properly function when I upgrade my memory to 8gb ram and Windows 7 x64.
  • 0 Hide
    darkknight22 , December 9, 2009 11:10 PM
    omnimodis7864 bit sound good to you? Much improved user interface? Try the beta and see if you like it, if not then you won't have to wonder, you'll know for sure! Cheers.


    Yes it's good and all, but more most users completley unnescessary, especially when the large corporations they are targeting AREN'T running 64 bit systems.....

    I would think they'd be better off improving multi-thread efficiency first
  • 0 Hide
    wildwell , December 10, 2009 12:00 AM
    abhikdid you know that office 2007 was infact version twelve of the windows versions? Microsoft skipped version 13 and jumped to version 14 because they think 13 is an unlucky number. look it up if you dont believe me.

    So maybe this should be "Office 14.1."
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , December 10, 2009 1:56 AM
    Like, what has Office 2000 missing that latest office packs have that's absolutely necessary?
    Nearly nothing. For the average person, if Office 2000 would only have worked on Win7, we'd have more than enough with that!

    Why does everything HAVE to become more and more stuffed, more and more graphical and visual?
    To the point where it stresses ordinary processors so much it's barely able to run on an ordinary computer, and for what? To write a sheet of paper?
    Come on!
    I really could do without all the extra's. Many of the things incorporated are only there so that you can buy the newest Office, without ever using something in there that isn't already there in earlier office packs!

    I'm slowly starting to get tired of MS, forcing users to purchase a new pack every year!

    I wish some sort of competitor would rise up, create a great working, light kernel, that is fast, energy efficient, and a graphical desktop that really is focused on performance and battery life, instead of all this visual battery eating crap!

    So far Xubuntu would be great, I wished only that there would be more software packs and games converted to this platform!
  • 1 Hide
    Spike53 , December 10, 2009 2:09 AM
    darkknight22Yes it's good and all, but more most users completley unnescessary, especially when the large corporations they are targeting AREN'T running 64 bit systems.....I would think they'd be better off improving multi-thread efficiency first


    I guess all 64-bit OS's are "completely unnecessary especially when the large corporations they are targeting AREN'T running 64 bit systems" too. What gets installed on my system or yours or anyone's for that matter, doesn't have to be controlled by what large corporation's PC's are running. Your stance is naive.
    I'd welcome 64 bit. Doesn't mean I need more RAM for docs and whatnot but if my OS is 64, why not get 64 programs to compliment it.
  • 0 Hide
    cablechewer , December 10, 2009 3:12 AM
    Actually it isn't anywhere near the 15th iteration of Office. In Windows 3.1 people were using Word 2.0c before Word 95 shipped. I think it was Excel that had the highest version number. With the release of Office 95 the version numbers were brought into sync with each other. Word went from 2 to 7 if I remember correctly. 13 was also skipped.

    The iterations since I entered the work force have been Word 2.0, 95, 97, 98 (I think it was Mac only), 2000, XP, 2007 and now 2010. So not counting minor updates that makes Office 15 the 9th iteration of Word, Access and probably PowerPoint for Windows. It is incredible how short human memories and a version number can give a product history and depth :) .

    So the real question - If MS is still pumping out versions of office will the 15th iteration (when it gets here in the 2022-2028 time frame) really include the Kitchen sink? Will I need 1 TB of RAM to run it? :D 
  • 0 Hide
    djab , December 10, 2009 3:40 PM
    wow! Naming scheme does not really mean anything for professional users ;-)

    We've just switched from Office 97 to Office 2000 at work...
    And I guess it is the same for many companies.
    Oh and we are also using it on XP and IE is still IE6.
    Fortunately we are allowed to use Firefox instead ... the 1.7 version.
    :-(
    Anyway, knowing that MS is working on Office 2015 is not surprising.
    It would be surprising if they only start to work on it in 2014.
  • 0 Hide
    igot1forya , December 10, 2009 5:21 PM
    MS and other companies should just draw the line and write 64bit only for all OS/Apps... then and only then can I get descent 64bit graphics driver!
  • 0 Hide
    dedhorse , December 10, 2009 8:44 PM
    ProDigit80Why does everything HAVE to become more and more stuffed, more and more graphical and visual?To the point where it stresses ordinary processors so much it's barely able to run on an ordinary computer, and for what? To write a sheet of paper?Come on!I really could do without all the extra's... I'm slowly starting to get tired of MS, forcing users to purchase a new pack every year!


    Who's forcing you to buy anything? You don't want all those extras to write a sheet of paper? Use Wordpad or Works. They come bundled with nearly every windows distribution. Or use OpenOffice, or any other free word processor out there. Seriously, what are you complaining about? Does someone have a gun to your head saying you have to use the latest version of Office at all times? What a lame rant.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , December 10, 2009 8:57 PM
    There are tons of reasons to use a 64bit Office Application not just Excel and Access :) , how about outlook with a 64bit MAPI client for those exchange power users with large mailboxes and in some cases even larger PST files! How about 3rd party applications that work with office MAPI or Macro related! IE... backup solutions that would benefit from a 64bit MAPI client for mailbox level backups. Why restore an entire exchange database when I can restore a single piece of mail faster than a 32bit MAPI. It’s not all about how much memory it can access it’s also about performance. Think about it from an administration point of view an administrator that is not old and set in his ways with suspenders and a belt yelling get off my network! imho lol
  • 0 Hide
    omnimodis78 , December 10, 2009 10:02 PM
    wesleywatson64 bit? Christ, who needs 3GB of memory reserved for a word document they're typing up?

    Clearly you don't understand the real benefits of 64 bit programs. If you're using a 64 bit OS then it makes more sense to use 64 bit programs - not to mention that for anyone who multitasks within the Office suite will get real world benefits from running a 64 bit version. And as someone pointed it out already, there's more to Office than just Word.