Chris Roberts' Star Citizen Hangar Module Goes Live

Today marks the first step in a public showing of Chris Robert's record breaking and upcoming title, Star Citizen. The extremely successful crowdfunded title has yielded its first interactive fruit for those who have pledged enough to have a ship, some in-game credits, and access to the full game. At this time, that means you need to pledge for at least the Digital Scout Package available in the Robert's Space Industries (RSI) store for $30.

The Hangar Module, scheduled for release on August 29th 2013, will allow pledgers to finally jump into a very early pre-alpha version of the game engine to explore the ships that they have been so eagerly awaiting. With the exception of a couple of ships, pledgers will be able to jump into the hangar and see every ship that they have purchased through the RSI store. The Star Citizen team has promised that the ships currently missing from the hanger will be added in at a later date. The hangar will be used to store all of a player's collected ships and items in future versions of the game.

The current hardware requirements to try out the hanger are outlined as follows:

Windows 7 or 8 64-bit Dual Core CPU Intel: Core2 Duo 2.4 GHz AMD: Phenom X2 8 GB of RAM Nvidia Geforce 460GTX AMD Radeon HD5850 DirectX 11. Keep in mind that these are estimated system requirements and may change for the final release of the game.

The system requirements are currently a bit high, however, the Star Citizen team has stated that since this is a pre-alpha version of the game, there is still a lot of optimization left to be done. Additionally, there's no guarantee that if you meet the hardware requirements you will be able to run the game. There will be bugs, and there will be performance issues with the Hangar. The RSI team wishes for players to report these issues in a special forum on their website called the "Hangar Module: Bugs & Issues."

For more information on the Hangar Module release, please check out the official announcement and FAQ on the Robert's Space Industries website.

Edit: The Hanger Module has been released to the public! Click the link below to see if you qualify for access, and to download the Hangar Module yourself!

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  • nicodemus_mm
    GrandMaster: If you took the time to do ANY research your questions would be answered... except maybe the last one.
    Why crowdfunding? Why not? You don't have to buy in and, given what you've demonstrated, hopefully won't. Crowdfunding gives the developer control of the money without the demands that investors and publishers make that change the intended direction of development.
    Why not pitch it to developers? CIG is a developer. If you meant publishers: The last time Chris Roberts got involved with a large publisher they dissolved his company and killed the IP. Many of us supporting the game did so specifically to send a message to large publishers that "we're tired of their crap and we'll handle it from here." Same for War for the Overworld.
    As they say: "If you want something done right, do it yourself." In this case it may change the gaming industry to the advantage of the consumer.
    17
  • Other Comments
  • Grandmastersexsay
    Why crowd funding? Why not simply pitch the game to the plethora of game developers? Minecraft didn't need crowd funding and that was written by pretty much one person. It just feels like a pyramid scheme. Is this game going to try to get me to change energy providers?
    -18
  • nicodemus_mm
    GrandMaster: If you took the time to do ANY research your questions would be answered... except maybe the last one.
    Why crowdfunding? Why not? You don't have to buy in and, given what you've demonstrated, hopefully won't. Crowdfunding gives the developer control of the money without the demands that investors and publishers make that change the intended direction of development.
    Why not pitch it to developers? CIG is a developer. If you meant publishers: The last time Chris Roberts got involved with a large publisher they dissolved his company and killed the IP. Many of us supporting the game did so specifically to send a message to large publishers that "we're tired of their crap and we'll handle it from here." Same for War for the Overworld.
    As they say: "If you want something done right, do it yourself." In this case it may change the gaming industry to the advantage of the consumer.
    17
  • chronium
    Minecraft did do crowdfunding by selling the alpha version of the game at a discount. Notch was just lucky that the game blew up on it's own with needing to do his own advertising.
    4