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Kingston Shows External USB 3.0 HyperX SSD

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 27 comments

We get a peek at another high-performance external SSD coming this summer.

Kingston demonstrated at a private event in Taiwan an early working model of its upcoming external SSD solution that runs on the USB 3.0 interface.

As part of its high-performance line, the external SSD will bear the HyperX brand as well as the blue-colored theme. The official target speed is 195 MB/s sequential read and 160 MB/s sequential write, but we got to see a real working model in action.

The drive comes with an external cable that's able to auto-detect and switch between USB 2.0 and 3.0. The drive itself will also indicate which interface it is running on, with a green light indicating USB 2.0 and a blue light signaling USB 3.0

The drives will come in 64, 128 and 256GB capacities. Kingston isn't ready to talk about price or which controller and NAND chips that it is using for this product yet, but we'll find out soon before the planned August 2010 launch date.

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  • 11 Hide
    figgus , June 3, 2010 3:43 PM
    I'm not sure I see the point, to be honest. SSDs are great for boot drives and often used programs, but to use them for "storage" beyond that just isn't cost effective.

    Are you really going to store movies and music on an SSD? Even if you did, would you need that kind of speed?

    What use is a smaller, faster external drive?
Other Comments
  • 2 Hide
    requiemsallure , June 3, 2010 3:00 PM
    i would love one of these, i was waiting for something like this, its why i bought my P7P55D-E
  • 6 Hide
    ikoliss , June 3, 2010 3:05 PM
    wooo, Finally!!
  • 0 Hide
    itadakimasu , June 3, 2010 3:42 PM
    Are the high prices due to manufacturing, or R&D ? I'd guess the price would be slightly more than comparable internal drives that are out now.
  • 11 Hide
    figgus , June 3, 2010 3:43 PM
    I'm not sure I see the point, to be honest. SSDs are great for boot drives and often used programs, but to use them for "storage" beyond that just isn't cost effective.

    Are you really going to store movies and music on an SSD? Even if you did, would you need that kind of speed?

    What use is a smaller, faster external drive?
  • 0 Hide
    segio526 , June 3, 2010 4:02 PM
    The only value I can see in this is when noise is a factor or for use at extremely high altitudes. Although, what would a mountain climber need an external SSD for? Their laptop and cameras would be already using SSDs.

    Off topic, what coolers are they using in that case?!?!
  • 2 Hide
    djdarko321 , June 3, 2010 4:29 PM
    thatd be gr8 for audio samples and the go. less latencies between ur DAW or VDJ workstation and audio files when going mobile. but any audio or video person knows that having your samples on another drive (especially faster as another SSD) greatly helps
  • 1 Hide
    oxxfatelostxxo , June 3, 2010 4:29 PM
    Quote:
    Are you really going to store movies and music on an SSD? Even if you did, would you need that kind of speed?


    I would think the benefiet would be more for installing intensive programs CADD, photoshop ect on something like a labtop that can only contain 1 drive, So lets say your main is a SSD already but your size requirements arnt large, but u run alot of intensive programs..
  • 2 Hide
    Computer_Lots , June 3, 2010 5:50 PM
    Anybody else think it's weird that they're using a giant RAM cooler and a cheap old stock cooler for the CPU?
  • 3 Hide
    the last resort , June 3, 2010 6:27 PM
    ^^ look at the GPU cooler.
  • 3 Hide
    ThisIsMe , June 3, 2010 6:40 PM
    Computer_LotsAnybody else think it's weird that they're using a giant RAM cooler and a cheap old stock cooler for the CPU?

    It's Kingston

    You know, the "memory" company.
  • 0 Hide
    rollerdisco , June 3, 2010 7:14 PM
    figgusI'm not sure I see the point, to be honest. SSDs are great for boot drives and often used programs, but to use them for "storage" beyond that just isn't cost effective.Are you really going to store movies and music on an SSD? Even if you did, would you need that kind of speed?What use is a smaller, faster external drive?

    I like this, because you could take your drive with you, and then the computer will not boot up. great computer security!!
  • 0 Hide
    clist , June 3, 2010 7:46 PM
    figgusI'm not sure I see the point, to be honest. SSDs are great for boot drives and often used programs, but to use them for "storage" beyond that just isn't cost effective.Are you really going to store movies and music on an SSD? Even if you did, would you need that kind of speed?What use is a smaller, faster external drive?


    Two words: Virtual Machines

    My VMs run as fast on my laptop with an SSD than they do on my desktop with a regular HD - even though the CPU on the desktop blows the laptop away. Additionally, if you're a developer-on-the-go, being able to easily move your whole workspace, email, development tools, documents, etc around from machine to machine (as long as the machine has VMWare installed) kicks ass.

    Now if only someone would just put USB3 ports on a laptop that has a decent display and doesn't look/feel like a PoS I'd be able to upgrade my laptop, get one of these drives, and stop copying my VHD snapshot-files back and forth... Thought Dell was going to put USB3 on this year's Covet, but apparently that's not the case...

    Cheers,
    CList
  • -5 Hide
    WarraWarra , June 3, 2010 9:33 PM
    Very nice, why the horrible "blue" 4k performance, can do that with a usb2 sata and old hard drive.
    Surely this is not a micro sd card so 4k should be minm 80MB/s at least.

    512k ?
    My XP64 sp2 can go max 64k and have to have 64k minm for OCZ ssd to get it up to rated speed.

    Don't tell me to downgrade to Vista or Win7 as the performance knock is not worth the partial speed gained using larger 256k / 512k on I7c-930.
  • 0 Hide
    eddieroolz , June 4, 2010 12:00 AM
    External SSD? I don't think that's a good choice - even if they do come down in price.
  • 0 Hide
    Gin Fushicho , June 4, 2010 12:15 AM
    I think I'd prefer a E-HDD that replaces me current e-SATA one.
  • 3 Hide
    Fokissed , June 4, 2010 1:16 AM
    WarraWarraVery nice, why the horrible "blue" 4k performance, can do that with a usb2 sata and old hard drive.Surely this is not a micro sd card so 4k should be minm 80MB/s at least. 512k ? My XP64 sp2 can go max 64k and have to have 64k minm for OCZ ssd to get it up to rated speed.Don't tell me to downgrade to Vista or Win7 as the performance knock is not worth the partial speed gained using larger 256k / 512k on I7c-930.

    Can anyone comprehend this?
  • 0 Hide
    jarnail24 , June 4, 2010 1:52 AM
    fokissedCan anyone comprehend this?

    Seriously what did he say? +1
  • 0 Hide
    liquidsnake718 , June 4, 2010 3:02 AM
    And now the SSD era for the average consumer begins.... long live(truly) USB3.0 and faster data transfer/read/write rates!
  • 0 Hide
    dEAne , June 4, 2010 8:48 AM
    Hope the price will be a little lower.
  • 0 Hide
    Hiniberus , June 4, 2010 9:03 AM
    I think HDD's will last many years to come with SSD's being the slightly more expensive alternative (Mind you, I said slightly because I'm talking about future prospects). Least they manage to bring down the prices of SSD's to something decent when comparing them to HDD's. Sure SSD's do have greater performance aspects but for them to really pick up, they'd need to beat current HDD prices because let's face it, the average Joe is just going to go for something that's cheap, an even bigger thing is that 3/4's of computer users just buy off the shelf ready made computer that's cheap. SSD's don't come cheap so for now HDD's will stay strong for a while.

    Either way, I'm not going to get my hopes up that the price would be something I'd pay for when I'd probably manage x2 the storage at the same price if not less.
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