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Average Performance And Efficiency

GeForce GTX 880M, 870M, And 860M: Mobile GPUs, Tested
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The GK106-equipped GeForce GTX 770M appears out of place compared to GK104-based 880M, 780M, and 860M models. That's one reason we need to stay cautious about references to the GeForce GTX 860M, which is available as two different GPUs. Even though Nvidia appears to be running its efficient GM107 processor at close-to-desktop frequencies, there's just no way to know where it falls in the following chart until benchmark data is available.

Anyone who spends a lot of time gaming should be happy to know that performance increases proportionally with power. All three of Nvidia's new modules improve frame rates enough to bolster efficiency compared to the modules they replace, and that's what we want to see.

Display all 35 comments.
  • 0 Hide
    CaptainTom , April 23, 2014 12:15 AM
    Eh these generations are all the same cards. Show us a 980M with full maxwell. Then we'll talk...
  • 0 Hide
    dscudella , April 23, 2014 1:05 AM
    Looks like maybe two more generations before we see single gpu 4K mobile gaming.
  • 2 Hide
    Puiucs , April 23, 2014 1:21 AM
    we need them to finish working on 20nm fast. TSMC just can't do it anymore. global foundries has 14nm only on paper too....
  • 2 Hide
    guvnaguy , April 23, 2014 4:09 AM
    I'm actually fairly impressed. Their website says a max of 6 hours battery on "UMA" mode. Would you be able to test this, Tom?

    Previously I wouldn't consider getting a gaming laptop due to their short battery life, even when not gaming. But if a laptop with this kind of hardware can manage 5 - 6 hours, I'd consider it...
  • 3 Hide
    ubercake , April 23, 2014 4:30 AM
    Page one gives the impression you might include desktop cards so we could get a frame of reference with regard to desktop v laptop GPU performance. Then I looked immediately at the BF4 page and found no desktop GPUs in the performance charts?
  • -1 Hide
    Ninjawithagun , April 23, 2014 4:54 AM
    Highly disappointed overall by the 800M series performance. I can feel assured that my GTX780Ms in my Alienware 18 will serve me well for at least another year. So, whatever happened to multi-core GPUs?? The concept works well for desktop CPUs, yet we have not seen it in desktop or mobile GPUs as of yet? ATI's Hawaii GPU comes close in certain aspects regarding behavior like a multi-core GPU by handing off processes to other chips within the die. One step closer to a next-gen GPU, yet still so far...
  • 1 Hide
    jrharbort , April 23, 2014 6:24 AM
    A shame this didn't include the Maxwell-based 860M. It performs much more in line with what we'd expect from a true next-gen mobile chip (I'm currently using said chip, and still exercising its capabilities). I can say it's roughly 30% faster than the previous gen 765M, and benchmarks by others have shown it to be twice as fast as the GTX 660M while staying at a max of 50W TDP. I've yet to do any real benchmarking myself, so if anyone cares to see any, leave me some suggestions of what to use (preferably free software).
  • 1 Hide
    hannibal , April 23, 2014 7:13 AM
    Is there any way of knowing if you get kepler 860 or maxwell 860 when you buy a laptop?
    I hate these kind of naming tricks... Even 860a and 860b or anything that gives out what you will get.
  • 0 Hide
    jrharbort , April 23, 2014 7:24 AM
    Quote:
    Is there any way of knowing if you get kepler 860 or maxwell 860 when you buy a laptop?
    I hate these kind of naming tricks... Even 860a and 860b or anything that gives out what you will get.
    It is difficult to know unless you get more specific information from the manufacturer before purchase (or find benchmarks of the computer model you're looking at beforehand). The MSi GE60 Apache Pro was the first notebook to feature the Maxwell-based 860M.
  • 6 Hide
    dstarr3 , April 23, 2014 7:38 AM
    Quote:
    So, whatever happened to multi-core GPUs?? The concept works well for desktop CPUs, yet we have not seen it in desktop or mobile GPUs as of yet?


    GPUs have been multi-core for ages now. Well beyond desktop cores, even. The GTX880M in particular is a 1,536-core GPU. Similar numbers have been around for a long time.
    http://www.geforce.com/hardware/notebook-gpus/geforce-gtx-880m/specifications
  • 0 Hide
    Steveymoo , April 23, 2014 9:02 AM
    Scumbag Nvidia. Want a new GPU? Here's exactly the same piece of silicon with a slightly faster clock rate and increased power usage, and higher price. Laziest business model ever.
  • 2 Hide
    Crashman , April 23, 2014 9:10 AM
    Quote:
    I'm actually fairly impressed. Their website says a max of 6 hours battery on "UMA" mode. Would you be able to test this, Tom?

    Previously I wouldn't consider getting a gaming laptop due to their short battery life, even when not gaming. But if a laptop with this kind of hardware can manage 5 - 6 hours, I'd consider it...
    We have a couple complete notebooks set aside for that type of review :) 

    Quote:
    Highly disappointed overall by the 800M series performance. I can feel assured that my GTX780Ms in my Alienware 18 will serve me well for at least another year. So, whatever happened to multi-core GPUs?? The concept works well for desktop CPUs, yet we have not seen it in desktop or mobile GPUs as of yet? ATI's Hawaii GPU comes close in certain aspects regarding behavior like a multi-core GPU by handing off processes to other chips within the die. One step closer to a next-gen GPU, yet still so far...
    GPU's have been multi-core for several generations. And dual-GPU mobile solutions have come and gone several times as AMD basically applied a dual-GPU name to a pair of notebook modules (in CrossFire).

  • 1 Hide
    John Wittenberg , April 23, 2014 9:30 AM
    "Is there any way of knowing if you get kepler 860 or maxwell 860 when you buy a laptop?
    I hate these kind of naming tricks... Even 860a and 860b or anything that gives out what you will get."

    Yes, the 860M Maxwell is a 2GB card that is soldered directly onto the motherboard with only 640 cuda cores w/ 50W TDP. The Kelper 860M is 4GB and is MXM (replaceable) with 1152 cuda cores w/ 75W TDP.
  • 0 Hide
    John Wittenberg , April 23, 2014 9:32 AM
    As an addendum, I was unaware that the Kepler 860M even came in 2GB - but according to Tom's it is?
  • 0 Hide
    Menigmand , April 23, 2014 9:51 AM
    I would love to see a comparison benchmark between mobile maxwell (860m) and desktop maxwell (750 Ti)
  • -2 Hide
    h2323 , April 23, 2014 10:04 AM
    Toms never gets anything right, should have added a radeon or two to the bench's, updated in this test.
  • 2 Hide
    Crashman , April 23, 2014 10:11 AM
    Quote:
    Toms never gets anything right, should have added a radeon or two to the bench's
    Already done:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-780m-770m-765m,3732.html

  • 0 Hide
    cynic77 , April 23, 2014 10:18 AM
    Quote:
    As an addendum, I was unaware that the Kepler 860M even came in 2GB - but according to Tom's it is?


    I was going to comment earlier and ask Thomas about this. Did Origin PC come up with custom 800M-series modules for this article?... or was half the VRAM somehow disabled? If not, I'm confused. The EON17-S as available on their web site comes with the "standard" double-memory configurations - 4 GB for the 860M, 6 GB for the 870M, and a whopping 8 GB for the 880M. I didn't see this mentioned in the article at all. On other forums, users have indicated this "double-VRAM" is a waste. It would have been nice if this article had put the "double-VRAM" to the test, especially at the QHD resolution.
  • 2 Hide
    Crashman , April 23, 2014 10:55 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    As an addendum, I was unaware that the Kepler 860M even came in 2GB - but according to Tom's it is?


    I was going to comment earlier and ask Thomas about this. Did Origin PC come up with custom 800M-series modules for this article?... or was half the VRAM somehow disabled? If not, I'm confused. The EON17-S as available on their web site comes with the "standard" double-memory configurations - 4 GB for the 860M, 6 GB for the 870M, and a whopping 8 GB for the 880M. I didn't see this mentioned in the article at all. On other forums, users have indicated this "double-VRAM" is a waste. It would have been nice if this article had put the "double-VRAM" to the test, especially at the QHD resolution.
    I checked the pictures in the article's image gallery :)  GPU-Z shows that the memory amount in the tables was wrong, so I corrected the tables. Thanks! I wish someone would have caught this earlier, but I'm glad I at least got to correct it the same day.
  • -1 Hide
    mikeangs2004 , April 23, 2014 12:29 PM
    I wouldn't buy a laptop like this from rjtech nor SSD until M.2 10G comes out
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