Skip to main content

Anonymous Releases Its Own Linux-based Operating System

We "expect" Anonymous to launch coordinated DDoS attacks on sites that fall within their wrath. We "expect" Anonymous to be vocal about beliefs on political corruption and the rights of everyday people. But what we didn't expect to see was an actual operating system from the hactivist group, yet it seemingly makes perfect sense given their view of governments and corporations worldwide.

Called Anonymous-OS Live, the 32-bit platform is built on top of the open-source Linux-based Ubuntu 11.10 operating system. It uses the Mate desktop and comes packed with pre-installed software including the Tor browser, Hash Identifier, XChat IRC, SQL Poison, Find Host IP, ParolaPass Password Generator, Anonymous HOIC and more.

According to the Anonymous-OS website, the platform was created for "educational purposes" while also designed for checking the security of web pages. Users can boot with the new OS by creating a LiveUSB using Unetbootin which is located here. But given that the OS wasn't developed by any Genuine Source, curious downloaders should use the software with extreme caution, as it could be back-doored by any law enforcement company or hacker.

"Please don’t use any tool to destroy any web page," Anonymous states. "If you attack to any web page, [you] might end up in jail because it's a crime in most countries. The user has total responsibility for any illegal act."

Anonymous-OS Live v0.1 is free and available immediately for download by heading here (1.4 GB). Downloads have already surpassed 4,600 and the group says it is currently trying to respond to all feedback emails as quickly as possible. They also claim that the OS is 100-percent safe to use... just like any other Linux distribution.

  • officeguy
    "Please don’t use any tool to destroy any web page," Anonymous states. "If you attack to any web page, might end up in jail because it's a crime in most countries. The user has total responsibility for any illegal act."
    Hmmmm, interesting. So, they do know it is a crime if they attack web sites and that is what they do. I have been saying all along they these people ARE criminals and I always get thumbs down. They you Anonymous for aditting that you are criminals.
    Reply
  • stridervm
    In perspective.... It is a good starting point for people who are very Windows knowledgable but knows nothing about Linux.... Very interesting......
    Reply
  • I Have Try It,,,And Thats is Good OS,,,But, Many BUG on Tools,,,
    Reply
  • __-_-_-__
    meh, there's better linux distributions for... anon proposes... nevertheless, a great addition to anon tools.
    Reply
  • so what Every person is a criminal by some viewpoint, They are criminals cause they stand up for the people. YOU are a criminal cause i am 100% sure somewhere in your lifetime you copied an song. You are a criminal for jaywalking.. there are many things that call other criminals but are just ridiculous if you look at what ACTUALLY IS HAPPENING.

    Reply
  • alidan
    officeguyHmmmm, interesting. So, they do know it is a crime if they attack web sites and that is what they do. I have been saying all along they these people ARE criminals and I always get thumbs down. They you Anonymous for aditting that you are criminals.
    in the middle east if a woman is raped and she reports it, she is likely to be cained and jailed, while the man may have a far lesser sentence if any at all, because she had sex outside of marriage.

    because you follow the law 100% to the letter and there cant possible be bad laws or reasons to ever break them (not obey is really a better term) you must support this.

    if you don't understand why you get downvoted with this exaggerated (yet real world and true) example i dont think there is anything more you can be told.

    Reply
  • LuckyDucky7
    @officeguy

    Thank you Anonymous for admitting that you are criminals.

    You're a criminal too, you know.
    Ever watched a DVD on Linux?
    Ever downloaded anything?
    Ever sung a few lines from a song in public?

    Two of those are crimes punishable by a 250,000 dollar fine and possible jail time; the last one is simply a civil matter which can net rights-holders upwards of that quarter-million depending on how many songs you sung and how the jury's feeling.

    I'm not trying to change or hide the fact that DDoS attacks are criminal; and they will continue to be for the forseeable (10-30 years) future while the current crop of technology-dumb politicians die off. After that, I expect things to change- just like I expect the DMCA to be repealed at that time (there will be something else after that though).

    But the thing is that there are only certain ways to protest against a company or five that are trying to take away your freedoms; that way is online. You can't assemble many people who don't have much money to go halfway around the world (or even just the US)- so you protest in the only way you can, which in this case is online.

    But that's just talking about DDoS, which forms the majority of Anonymous' operations beside the usual trolling, raids, and other Internet jokes.

    I have no moral problems about joining 100,000 other people in burying a site in ping or ACK requests; that protest is usually broken up quickly and doesn't do any irreparable harm to the company you protest against.

    But I DO have a problem with actually accessing a server-side computer and changing files; it's like taking down a business's poster from the inside of the shop by breaking and entering. If it's illegal to do in the physical world it should be illegal to do in digital and vice versa (something Anon fights to protect in their own strange ways).

    But that's not the typical news-making operation against anti-1st-amendment target X which should be allowed to take place.
    Reply
  • lucky015
    LuckyDucky7@officeguyYou're a criminal too, you know. Ever watched a DVD on Linux? Ever downloaded anything? Ever sung a few lines from a song in public? Two of those are crimes punishable by a 250,000 dollar fine and possible jail time; the last one is simply a civil matter which can net rights-holders upwards of that quarter-million depending on how many songs you sung and how the jury's feeling.I'm not trying to change or hide the fact that DDoS attacks are criminal; and they will continue to be for the forseeable (10-30 years) future while the current crop of technology-dumb politicians die off. After that, I expect things to change- just like I expect the DMCA to be repealed at that time (there will be something else after that though).But the thing is that there are only certain ways to protest against a company or five that are trying to take away your freedoms; that way is online. You can't assemble many people who don't have much money to go halfway around the world (or even just the US)- so you protest in the only way you can, which in this case is online.But that's just talking about DDoS, which forms the majority of Anonymous' operations beside the usual trolling, raids, and other Internet jokes.I have no moral problems about joining 100,000 other people in burying a site in ping or ACK requests; that protest is usually broken up quickly and doesn't do any irreparable harm to the company you protest against.But I DO have a problem with actually accessing a server-side computer and changing files; it's like taking down a business's poster from the inside of the shop by breaking and entering. If it's illegal to do in the physical world it should be illegal to do in digital and vice versa (something Anon fights to protect in their own strange ways).But that's not the typical news-making operation against anti-1st-amendment target X which should be allowed to take place.
    I agree with everything you say except that breaking into a website and changing it is like a poster in a store.

    I would consider it more like damaging a Billboard on the side of a footpath, Destruction of property, Yes, Breaking and Entering, No. The files are placed in an area intended to be accessed by the public, Security measures are superficial, Hacking user or company data stored on secure(Non Publicly displayed) servers would be closer to breaking and entering.
    Reply
  • GreaseMonkey_62
    Yeah it doesn't sound like a good idea to use an OS put out by known hackers, DDOS bot users. I wouldn't be surprised at all if there was some sort of hidden keylogger built in.
    Reply
  • memadmax
    Why do they HAVE TO WEAR the stupid masks?

    Use a scarf instead or put on war paint.... you guys look stupid........
    Reply